White House rolls with sustainable Easter egg packaging






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Posted by Jenni Spinner, Senior Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/29/2013 10:37:00 AM





 

Souvenir Easter egg from White House egg roll in sustainble packaging. Photo: Monica GurzenskiThe White House Easter Eggs themselves, and the boxes they come in, are made from the wood products certified to have come from sustainably managed forests.

For the fifth straight year, the National Park Foundation has packaged the official White House Easter Egg in a gift box made from paperboard certified to the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) Standard. The souvenir Easter Egg itself is made of U.S. wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

 

Please visit this page on Monday for more information about the Easter Eggs and sustainable packaging. Until then, have a great holiday!







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Campaign takes a bite out of food packaging waste






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Posted by Jenni Spinner, Senior Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/29/2013 9:04:00 AM





Platos Table food containerPlatos Table announces a grassroots community campaign to eliminate single-use food containers in restaurants in St. Petersburg, FL, targeting polystyrene, brand name Styrofoam. Over 20 local restaurants and food markets have joined this unique campaign by posting a decal in their storefront windows designating them as Reuser sites that will support diners using their own containers for take-out. In return for saving the restaurant the cost of the container and helping the restaurant go green, the diner will receive some incentive, like a reduced meal cost or free drink. The restaurants are listed and updated on the website created especially for this campaign, http://www.reusers.com. Diners are encouraged to check out the list for Reuser sites and incentives, prior to dining.

 

Platos Table LLC, a women-owned small business in St. Petersburg, FL, the originator of this local campaign, is making inroads in eliminating take-out food container waste, especially polystyrene foam, sometimes sold under the brand name Styrofoam. “The appeal of single-use containers is convenience and low cost; the drawbacks are huge,” says Sheree Graves, one of the partners in Platos Table. “In the U.S., consumers are renowned single-users. The fact is that packaging makes up 30% of the trash in our landfills; that 30% is comprised of polystyrene foam, plastic and paper.” The EPA on its website “encourages practices that reduce the amount of waste needing to be disposed of, especially single-use packaging. The most effective way to reduce waste is to not create it in the first place.”

 

Graves and her business partner, Lela Garnett, decided in 2011, to invent a convenient container that could be used over and over. After looking at many materials, their choice was BPA-free polypropylene food grade plastic. Garnett says, “The unique design folds flat for storage and pops together; it is important that using the container (called Platos) is convenient, because it is replacing convenient single-use containers. This is a behavior change for the diner and a process change for the restaurant; neither is easy or cost-free.”

 

Over 100 cities and counties have banned polystyrene containers. This year in February, NY Mayor Bloomberg announced in his weekly city address that he was going to push to ban Styrofoam food packaging. Some of the oldest polystyrene bans in restaurants include Portland, OR, Berkley, CA and Carmel, CA, all dating the late eighties. Philadelphia and Boston are considering ordinances banning the foam products and Chicago has a non-profit effort called “No Foam Chicago.”

 

The effort in St. Petersburg does not involve an ordinance or a complete ban. It is a volunteer effort that involves individuals and businesses cooperating. The St. Petersburg, FL campaign will kick off with an event on April 3, at which the initial list of local restaurant and market participants will be unveiled.

 

Source: Platos Table
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New Fave Juice Triples Launch Forecasts with Eye-popping Package

When The Fave Juice Company launched its three-SKU line of 100% fruit and vegetable juice blends in August 2012, the company knew the bottle could either make or break the business. Fave was a new breed of beverage: the first shelf-stable juice to offer three full servings of vegetables in each 8-oz. glass (most competitors have less than one) with just 60 calories per serving (half the average). Not only did the package need to stand out like a star on crowded juice shelves, but it also had to tell its healthy/low-cal story in three seconds of eye-time or less.

The final package, created by Chicago-based Berlin Packaging and the re:group creative agency in Ann Arbor, Michigan, did the job so well that the test launch at The Fresh Market’s 125 stores in 25 states tripled Fave’s sales forecasts. The results prompted the company to abandon an additional planned test and proceed immediately to a full rollout.

The package designers helped light the Fave fire with a 46 oz. bottle featuring full 360° shrink sleeves color-coordinated with the line’s Strawberry-Banana-Kiwi, Pomegranate-Blueberry-Goji, and Orange-Tangerine-Pineapple flavors. Package highlights include:

·      An off-the-shelf 46 oz. PET hot-fill juice round selected in part for its ability to withstand the temperatures of Fave’s flash pasteurization process.

·      43mm easy-seal, tamper-evident caps in three colors matching the red, blue and orange of each flavor’s shrink sleeve.

·      Full-body shrink wrap labels designed by re:group featuring vibrant colors, fruit and vegetable illustrations reflecting each SKU’s contents, and prominent text promoting the product’s 100% natural, three-vegetable-serving and 60-calorie features.

Berlin Packaging sources the bottles and caps from two different suppliers and coordinates component shipments to the contract filler in California, relieving Fave of all sourcing and logistics responsibilities as well as working with the closure supplier to tie into their existing production runs to avoid the usual 1.5 million minimum for color orders. Shrink sleeve fabricator SleeveSeal ships the finished labels to the bottling plant for application immediately after filling.

Within a few months of launch, two of the top 10 U.S. supermarket chains had agreed to carry the brand beginning this year, and global markets like China began lining up to be next.

“We spent four years developing this product line, but at the end of the day the bottle is our primary salesman,” says Fave’s Dave Kirkpatrick. “We have only a few seconds to attract shoppers in the juice aisle and tell them our story. The sales numbers and strong retailer interest show that the package is doing the job even better than we expected.”

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OTF Security Label Provides Protection Against Tampering and Counterfeiting

3S Simons Security Systems GmbH has developed the OTF security label specifically designed to protect security-relevant devices and premium packaging used for quality products. This also ensures that online terminals used for cashless payment transactions, for example, are protected against tampering. The advantage of the new closure seal: It is based on Secure-ID technology and can be completely removed without leaving any residue behind. In contrast to Void films, adhesive residues which might contaminate the protected device are thus avoided. Only a gentle push or a slight increase in temperature will cause the OTF security label to show number strings, logos or different visual elements so that any attempt to tamper with a device or packaging is instantly identified. Based on the counterfeit protection system SECUDATA, micro color code particles were also added to the label enabling identification of originals. This anti-forgery measure can be combined with traceability systems, such as data matrix or RFID. That way, 3S ensures seamless security along the entire supply chain. The expert for legally binding counterfeit protection will be showcasing its wide range of products and solutions at Hannover Messe, in hall 8, stand no. D06/10, from 8 – 12 April 2013.

No sticky residue after removing the labels
In the manufacturing, retail trade and services sector different technical devices, such as online terminals for cashless payment transactions, are used which must not be opened by unauthorized persons. Void labels used to be applied in order to document unauthorized opening of devices or original packaging. The word “void” appears when removing this type of label. The disadvantage of this method: Sticky residue may stay on the device and contaminate it. This especially applies to leased devices.

Based on Secure-ID technology, the new OTF security label by 3S Simons Security allows for complete removal of the labels without leaving any adhesive residue. Number strings, logos or different visual elements are embedded in the opaque thin film which remains completely invisible until activation. By a gentle push or a slight increase in temperature (e.g. if someone tries to remove the seal using a hair dryer), these elements will become visible so that tampering with devices can be instantly detected. Premium packaging for quality products (e.g. watches, jewellery, perfumes, consumer electronics) can also be secured sustainably when using 3S’ new solution for opening protection.

Combined protection against tampering and counterfeiting
Protection against unauthorized opening is just one of the many aspects involved in OFT security labelling: On the basis of SECUDATA, 3S’ solution for counterfeit protection, micro color code particles are compounded in the security label allowing for identification of originals. These particles are made of melamine alkyd polymers, manufactured in different sizes beginning at eight micrometers (µm). Color-code protection is invisible to the naked eye. However, a standard pen microscope suffices to identify the code. The code consists of four to ten different color coatings layered on top of each other. The layers which are prepared with normal, ultraviolet or infrared colors are extremely temperature and chemical resistant. The color-code system has been forgery-proof for over 15 years and is therefore accepted as evidence by courts.

Each customer using the OTF security label receives his own unique micro color code providing definite proof of authenticity. It is also possible to implement additional security features such as 2D codes, variable data, serial numbers, security punching, ultraviolet and infrared properties. Another option is to combine the color codes with traceability technologies (e.g. data matrix or RFID). This aspect is becoming increasingly important because, contrary to what is often claimed, traceability codes provide no anti-counterfeit protection. Micro color codes are directly applied onto the product or its packaging to ensure counterfeit-proof traceability. Commodity management or traceability code and the product are thus protected against counterfeiting in a manner that cannot be legally contested. In this way, the OTF security label ensures seamless protection of the entire flow of goods and materials.

Active anti-forgery strategy strengthens corporate image
Not only does the new OTF security label offer protection against tampering and counterfeiting, but it also consolidates the image of a company as a guarantor of proven quality and great transparency. Given the worldwide activities of gangs of forgers, both distributors and consumers are increasingly giving credit to a manufacturer’s involvement in the fight against product piracy, including communication to the public. “After all, counterfeit protection is also consumer protection”, says Rolf Simons, managing director of 3S Simons Security Systems GmbH. “In view of the risks associated with counterfeit products, consumers should be able to identify any product as original, in particular if it affects their health and lives.”

3S Simons Security Systems GmbH
3S Simons Security Systems GmbH is an internationally renowned manufacturer of labelling systems for legally binding counterfeit protection. On the basis of the world’s smallest micro color codes SECUTAG, 3S has developed several industry solutions against product piracy. They allow users to secure products, spare parts and accessories, tools, drugs, cosmetics, textile and sporting goods, lifestyle articles, art objects, primary and secondary packaging, quality and closure seals, pallets, documents, certificates and ERP data, among others. Moreover, 3S security solutions can be combined with traceability systems (such as data matrix or RFID) so that the entire production and supply chain is seamlessly protected against counterfeiting.

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SC Johnson debuts concentrated, packaging-saving Smart Twist Cleaning System






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/27/2013 3:19:34 PM





SCJ Smart TwistSC Johnson, Racine, WI, announces the innovative Smart Twist Cleaning System, which uses less packaging and helps reduce waste with three concentrated cleaners in one space-saving, handy sprayer. This breakthrough cleaning product offers a fast and easy solution and provides another everyday green option for busy families. The Smart Twist Cleaning System is available exclusively online.

 

“As a fundamental goal of our sustainability efforts, we strive to deliver innovative, effective home cleaning products that make it easier for families to make everyday green choices,” says Kelly M. Semrau, senior vice president, corporate sustainability Officer at SC Johnson. “The Smart Twist Cleaning System is an example of our continued efforts to test, learn and improve in the concentrated cleaning space in order to drive real, positive environmental changes.”

 

American consumers buy 320 million cleaning products in trigger bottles each year, and millions end up in landfills. By comparison, concentrates use less packaging and can help reduce waste compared to buying a new trigger bottle. In fact, if just 20 percent of those 320 million bottles were refilled rather than discarded, it could save seven million pounds of plastic.

 

Along with being an innovative, smart, time-saving solution, the Smart Twist Cleaning System is a good choice for reducing waste, too. Each concentrated cleaner cartridge:

  • Requires 63 percent less plastic than a new standard spray bottle;
  • Avoids transporting up to 22oz of water, depending on the formula;
  • Is recyclable in most community programs.

 

The Smart Twist Cleaning System can be customized by adding a choice of three concentrated cleaner cartridges into the sprayer unit so there is no more carrying multiple cleaners around the house. Fill the water tank with tap water and screw the cap on tightly. Snap the concentrated cleaner into the carousel; twist the carousel to switch instantly between cleaners as you move from room-to-room and surface-to-surface throughout your home.

 

Smart Twist brings added convenience by automatically adding the right amount of water for you-just spray and wipe surface to clean. With three cleaners in one sprayer, the Smart Twist Cleaning System makes cleaning every room in the house faster and easier.

 

Each Smart Twist concentrated cleaner cartridge is available in the following five trusted cleaners for a powerful cleaning performance:

  • Windex Glass: Perfect for glass, mirrors, and chrome-use it for a streak-free shine;
  • fantastik Kitchen Fights tough grease and grime in the kitchen on countertops, stovetops, and stainless steel;
  • Scrubbing Bubbles Bathroom: Works to clean tough soap scum on all bathroom surfaces like tubs, showers, tile, counters, and sinks
  • Pledge Furniture: Cleans and dusts all hard surfaces in one easy step and is safe to use on wood
  • Shout Carpet: Ideal for spots and stains on the carpet

 

The Smart Twist Cleaning System is available for purchase exclusively online at SCJGreenChoices.com and SmartTwist.com in a variety of options, allowing customization for every home’s cleaning needs. Smart Twist Cleaning System Starter Kits include a sprayer and a set of three concentrated cleaner cartridges and are available in several options for $24.99 each, including: Kitchen/Bath Starter Kit containing a Windex Glass, Scrubbing Bubbles Bathroom and fantastik Kitchen concentrated cleaner cartridges; Living Spaces Starter Kit containing Windex Glass, Pledge Furniture and Shout Carpet concentrated cleaner cartridges. Smart Twist concentrated cleaner cartridges are sold in mix-and-match twin packs for $7.99.

 

Source: SCJohnson

 

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A ‘suite’ spot for flex packs






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GSC Packaging’s move into a new 100,000-sq-ft facility with 16 separate
packaging suites that improve quality control positions the contract
packager for continued growth in stick packs, pouches and bags for
powdered and other dry products.


Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/27/2013 2:47:33 PM





GSC-EntranceAt the center of the quality-protecting product and package flow are the 16 side-by-side packaging suites. Entered through a plastic curtain, each suite is subdivided into primary and secondary packaging operations and offer positive air flow and state-of-the-art dust collection for the largely powdery products. Credit: DAEMONpictures.comFor CEO Bob Shapiro, the recent move of GSC Packaging into a new 100,000-sq-ft facility in Atlanta fulfills a long-held vision: To conduct packaging production the way it should be done from a quality-optimized, material-flow perspective. The facility features a state-of-the-art layout and design, the latest air-handling technology, lot-code tracking, real-time computerized inventory control, dust control and air-conditioned storage. The plant has a centrally located quality lab and an on-site maintenance shop. Additionally, there are data ports in the manufacturing areas so that personnel can input production information in real-time online. 

But what’s at the focal point of Shapiro’s vision-and literally the center of the building’s layout-are 16 parallel packaging suites isolated from each other and from the rest of the plant. Each room is equipped with positive air pressure and subdivided by a cement wall into primary and secondary packaging operations. Personnel enter the front of each suite through a barrier of thick plastic curtains. 

While the packaging functions and machinery are segregated, so too are the upstream workers separated from the downstream. “Segregation was not feasible in the previous plant, but it’s something that I always wanted,” says Shapiro. “Essentially what we’ve done is removed much of the product contamination risk. Plant personnel are the main source of contamination in any food plant and with this approach we’ve minimized that risk.”

Due to the packaging of nutraceuticals and dietary supplements, the plant adheres to 21CFR111 guidelines that are a higher standard than for food processing for all products. “That drives everything here,” Shapiro points out (see “Adhering to a higher standard,” below). In one example, batches approved for packaging are secured within a locked fence in the warehouse.

One of the 16 suites is currently empty, but the others have been earmarked for on-going or short-term projects. “We can quickly set up each suite and take them down per-project or we can dedicate rooms indefinitely without interfering with other operations,” says Shapiro.

Typically 12 of the suites are actively packaging at any given time over the plant’s six days weekly, two shifts of operation. 

Within the suites, the operations boast 15 packaging production lines comprising seven horizontal form/fill/seal (FFS) lines, three six-lane stick pack vertical FFS packaging lines, as well as various semi-automatic, large-format automatic, secondary packaging, shrink wrapping, banding and cartoning, kitting and point-of-purchase display packaging. 

Using these systems, GSC Packaging packages dry food-grade powders and particulates for products including nutritional and protein supplements, drink mixes, dry cereals, hot chocolate mix and cheese powders. In addition to powdered products, it also packages croutons, soup mixes and rice. Starting in early 2013, it is packaging stuffing for the first time, for a nationally recognized celebrity brand. This month [April] it was planning to package granola for the first time, corresponding to the startup of two custom-dedicated lines to package the granola into single-serve packages. The products are primarily sold through retail rather than foodservice channels.

These dry foodstuffs are packaged into three primary package formats, all of which are flexibles: stick packs, stand-up pouches and bags that range in size from a 2×2-inch sugar-packet size sachet to a large-format, one-kilo bag 18 inches tall x 12 inches wide. The secondary packaging operations beyond the wall are a mix of semi-automatic and manual operations.

Shapiro is a proponent of flexible packaging. “We hear all the time about reduced packaging for sustainability and for environmental friendliness-and flexible packaging is extremely conducive to decreasing the amount of packaging needed to package a product. Retailers like Walmart/Sam’s Club continue to push companies to reduce the amount of packaging. For example, a conversion from a bag-in-box to a stand-up pouch with a zipper eliminates 30 percent of the packaging material. These flexible formats we offer are highly sustainable and on-trend.”

The company remains as flexible as its packaging. “That large-format bag was something we didn’t do a year ago,” says Shapiro. “We went from producing zero of those to about a million a month now. If someone came to us and said ‘this is a format and volume I’m interested in,’ we’ll take a look at it.”

Picking–and sticking with–a winner

Products arrive preblended in 50-lb bags, 500-kilo bulk sacks and everything in between. GSC Packaging prefers to use flexible screw conveyors from Flexicon to make the product transfer from bulk packages to its packaging machines. Due to the powdery nature of many of the products, the screw conveyors are paired with the plant’s state-of-the-art dustGSC SticksGSC Packaging views stick packs as one of the company’s big opportunities for growth. Credit: DAEMONpictures.com control from Donaldson Torit. “We have an enormous system for collecting dust throughout the plant for environmental and product quality reasons,” notes Shapiro. 

Sticks packs have become one of the most popular packages the company produces. That’s little surprise to Shapiro, who had such confidence in the potential of the format that he bought the company’s first stick-pack machine about six years ago without having a single customer. “I considered the trend of such an efficient, handy format and thought it would be successful and lucked out,” says Shapiro. 

Obviously, it was more foresight than mere luck. 

The VFFS maker, Viking Masek, had been recommended by a consultant. “It ran well and we had success with it,” he says of the first machine. “It’s the only machine I’ve ever had that was uncrated on a Monday and running product at production speeds on Thursday. That’s uncommon for a major piece of equipment.”

Several years later in 2008 he bought a second Viking Masek system; GSC Packaging’s newest Viking Masek Model ST560 stick-pack machine, built with the latest automation controls including servo drives, was being commissioned during our Q1 2013 visit. It can produce six stick-pack styles.

The stick-pack machines run at 50 cycles/min, and with a 6-up system the output is 300 packs/min. Product netweights are from 2 to 10 grams. Recently, one line produced 180,000 sticks on one shift, Shapiro boasts.
“The Viking Maseks are extremely well-made, just beautiful machines that have been refined over the years,” states Shapiro. “When we bought our second line, it just made sense to buy another one because, beyond their reliability, the operators’ familiarity allowed them to operate either line. That familiarity was also a big plus for our maintenance staff where standardizing also permits us to maintain a reduced number of spare parts. That has worked out well for us. When it came time to buy our third machine, I went right back to Viking Masek. The people there are nice and their technical support is tremendous.”

In one example, Shapiro made a call at noon for a critical problem and the technician from the company’s Minnesota headquarters arrived at the Atlanta plant by 7 p.m. that same day. 

Shapiro claims that stick packs are the least flexible of the packaging it makes due to the fact that, though the package length is adjustable, the stick packs have a fixed width of 22 millimeters. However, they can be produced with a pour-spout seal and with a tear notch. 

Shapiro feels stick packs continue to have staying power. “We still view stick packs as one of our big opportunities for growth,” he emphasizes. “There are few companies with our capability in the U.S. and none in the southeast. I receive one or two inquiries a day on stick packs.”

GSC-KHSA half dozen of the plant’s HFFS systems such as this one were refurbished with new components at a cost of $10,000 each. With a faster ROI versus new, the upgrades enhance the machines’ functionality as well as “curb appeal” for visitors in keeping with the new facility.‘Dazzling’ improvements in HFFS


Most of the HFFS machines are from KHS Bartelt, though GSC Packaging also operates other makes as well. He purchased his first KHS machine in 1999 and has added several more since. “They really own this market,” he says of the decision.

The most recent addition was a used RPM (rotary pouch machine) Model 950 KHS Bartelt started up in early 2012 that produces pouches with widths from 4 to 9.5 (hence the model designation) inches and from 4 to 15 inches high and with a 4-inch gusset for standing upright. The machine was rebuilt by KHS with upgraded electronics and new photoelectric sensors.

Shapiro likes that the Model 950 maintains positive control of the pouches using two clamps rather than one while they are transported through the machine. 

“You can drop a large dose and it maintains a solid grip, which then helps produce a good seal,” he points out. According to KHS, it can accept up to a 5-lb fill and is rated at 65 cycles/min with up to two fill heads. These larger packs are mainly protein supplements with multiday servings for 10-, 20- or 30-day portions. Other products packed into the large format include stuffing mixes and other foodservice items.

Shapiro liked the refurbishment so much he decided to do it for all seven of the HFFS machines, timed around the relocation. The motivation for the machinery makeover was as much for looks as performance. “This is a bright, shiny new plant and I wanted the equipment to be bright, shiny and like new,” says Shapiro. “We want visitors to be dazzled by the facility, the people and the equipment. While our sanitation crew is second to none, there’s only so much you can do with older equipment.”

Coordinated by his special projects manager and done before and during the move, each machine was stripped down to the frame, which was then sand-blasted, prepped and repainted. All drive motors were replaced and all wear parts were evaluated and replaced as needed by an outside contractor. As the machines were reassembled, current model parts were used exclusively. 

It took about two weeks per machine at a cost of $10,000 each. For Shapiro, that extra work and investment at an already crazy-busy time was worth it. “The machines look brand new,” he says. “It worked out great.” (See “On rebuilding equipment vs new,” below.)

Flexibility in materials and purpose


GSC Packaging’s film selection-driven by product and customer needs-is based on moisture- and oxygen-barrier requirements as well as graphics needs. The majority of the films used are metallized. Because he is not a films expert, Shapiro says he collaborates with several film manufacturers. 

“I become the focal point and bring all the parties together,” Shapiro explains. “I work with some film companies and folding carton companies and with suppliers of other packaging components. We provide a turnkey solution. We’re not necessarily the expert, but we partner with experts.” 

One of those expert resources is The Lithotype Co., which for many years has provided the company with rollstock film for stick packs and other products.

“Lithotype is extremely capable across many different formats,” says Shapiro. “They have wide- and narrow-web presses to do jobs both large and small.”

The vendor provides four basic film structures using various combinations of polyester, metallized low-density polyethylene, paper and foil. For example, a typical HFFS film is paper/LDPE/foil/LDPE. A common stick-pack structure is polyester/LDPE/foil/LDPE. Stick packs are offset-printed in as many as eight colors, though six is typical.
A new, fifth film structure introduced in February 2013 that is currently being evaluated by GSC Packaging consists of an outer layer of cellophane to replace the LDPE for stick packs. According to a Lithotype manager, the resultant EZ Tear material is an improvement over tear notches and laser score opening because the material can be easily opened at any point.

Another key film supplier is Chromatic Label, based in Irvine, CA. “We’ve worked very successfully with them,” says Shapiro. 

Shapiro’s go-to company for folding cartons, which he prefers to source locally due to shipping costs, is Printed Specialties in Carrollton, GA. The vendor provides GSC Packaging primarily with offset-printed solid bleached sulfate (SBS) cartons in the 15 to 18 pt range for carton counts from 10 to 200. The print may include specialty metallic inks. “They do a tremendous job for us,” adds Shapiro.

He says that customers often provide their own qualified suppliers: “We’re happy to work with any supplier.”

They are also open to work with just about any customer as well. While the company is 100 percent devoted to flexibles, GSC Packaging is open to non-flexibles, too. “We are a contract packer,” reminds Shapiro. “I tell prospects there’s nothing I like more than buying machines. If someone wanted to package into rigid containers, we’d consider it. While we’re exclusively flexible packaging, that’s as of today.” 

Some time ago Shapiro realized that companies that call on contract packagers want an extension of their own packaging operations–they don’t they want to hear about any limitations. Remaining flexible will remain fundamental to GSC Packaging’s continued success.

 

Chromatic Label, 949-475-2300
www.chromaticlabels.com

Donaldson Torit, 952-887-3131
www.donaldson.com

Flexicon Corp., 610-814-2400
www.flexicon.com

GSC Packaging, 404-505-9925
www.gscpackaging.com

KHS Bartelt, 941-359-4000
www.khs.com

The Lithotype Co., 800-871-8973
www.lithotype.com

Printed Specialties, 770-832-1341
www.printedspecialties.com

Viking Masek Global Packaging Technologies, 920-564-5051
www.vikingmasek.com

 

SIDEBARS:

 

On rebuilding equipment vs new
GSC Packaging CEO Bob Shapiro knows a lot about the concept and reality of refurbishing something old to make it new again. He’s done it not only for more than a half-dozen packaging machines, he’s had it done to the very building in which all this machinery resides, whereby most of the interior has been gutted and rebuilt from the ground up with new systems and walls installed.
We asked him more about his lessons learned from the pouching machinery upgrades that were done over the past six months: “To me, rebuilding is a good solution. The capital expenditure is lower so the return-on-investment is quicker. You give existing and familiar equipment a new life and bring it up to the standards of new equipment. We have had a very positive experience considering cost, timing and re-commissioning of the equipment. Feedback from our customers has been overwhelmingly positive as well since the equipment looks great and functions at or above original OEM specifications.”

 


GSC LockIngredients kept under lock and key limit access to help raise the company’s food safety and quality standards from food processing level to those of higher pharmaceutical-level compliance.Adhering to a higher standard
Rather than following food processing guidelines, GSC Packaging adheres to the more stringent pharmaceutical-level standards for all products. Examples include:
• A formal internal audit program is supplemented by monthly unannounced audits by GSC’s QA staff;
• Card-access security systems and surveillance cameras throughout the facility control personnel access to manufacturing areas and provide 24/7 inspection of all products and processes;
• Electronic inventory management system relies on the scanning of printed bar codes to ensure thorough ingredient identification, as well as forward and backward traceability;
• Sanitation and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) are augmented by validation of cleaning processes through lab testing of product samples.

 

A contract packaging perspective
Shapiro has a long history in contract packaging from his early days with Georgia Spice Co., a predecessor company of GSC Packaging. He offers his perspective on the business environment:
“Over the last decade people have been reticent to invest in plant and equipment. With the current economic environment, it’s become even more difficult and somewhat risky for especially big companies to be making these investments. That’s particularly true in start-up products or products that might have a limited life span. The trend we’ve seen is that there’s been an increased interest in contract manufacturing and contract packaging.
“We see a lot of opportunity with companies that don’t want to make their own capital expenditure investments or that want to concentrate on marketing rather than focus on running a manufacturing plant. We become that manufacturing plant and we just see opportunity after opportunity coming through because of that-a trend I expect to continue.”

 







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Sustainability named top purchase criteria for packaging






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/27/2013 2:07:44 PM





 

SMDI logoAn independent research study commissioned by the Steel Market Development Institute (SMDI), a business unit of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI), revealed 65 percent of decision makers at Fortune 500 consumer product companies view packaging sustainability as a high priority. The survey was conducted by MindClick in January and February and included packaging decision makers from major consumer packaged goods companies.

 

The challenge for consumer products firms, according to the research study, is the lack of meaningful information available to evaluate and compare the sustainability performance of competitive packaging materials. Packaging executives define sustainability as the way individual materials contribute to the environmental and social story of products and brands. Key contributors to determining sustainability include recycling and the energy required to transport, store, use and dispose of the packaging. Secondary considerations include the greater societal, environmental and community impacts related to the materials themselves.

 

National Education campaign launch

 

With an emphasis on performance, SMDI will launch a national education campaign to highlight the depth of steel’s leadership in meeting the sustainability needs of the packaging industry. As the preferred packaging material for more than 1,500 variations of food, pet food, paint, household products, health and beauty products, steel is delivering compelling sustainability solutions to consumer brands. Steel saves energy, ensures safe nutritious food, minimizes food waste and increases economic efficiencies. Further:

 

  • Across all markets, steel is the worlds most recycled material; more than all other materials combined;
  • Steel cans are the most recycled food package with a 71 percent recycling rate.
  • Steel food cans are more than 30 percent lighter than 25 years ago.

 

“Through the outreach effort, SMDI’s Steel Packaging Council will highlight steel’s role in meeting the sustainability needs of the packaging industry, while communicating the broader benefits of steel packaging,” Lawrence Kavanagh , president, SMDI says. “With its recycling, reusability and package integrity, steel is clearly the preferred material for the packaging industry and this campaign will further increase the industry’s awareness of these great benefits.”

 

To initiate the campaign, SMDI has partnered with Barton Seaver, renowned chef, National Geographic Fellow, TED Speaker, and the new director of the Healthy and Sustainable Food program at Harvard School of Public Health’s Center for Health and the Global Environment. Seaver is a keynote speaker at the American Packaging Summit
held March 26-27 in Chicago. Speaking to an audience of 150 senior packaging executives from leading consumer products firms, he will discuss the effects of packaging beyond the point of consumption.

 

The SMDI’s steel packaging campaign will continue through 2013 with online education sessions for professionals, industry-wide surveys about steel packaging and viral videos that share the positive economic, environmental and social benefits resulting from the use of steel in consumer packaging. The group also will launch an educational website (www.steelcan.com) and present at future packaging industry events.

 

AISI serves as the voice of the North American steel industry in the public policy arena and advances the case for steel in the marketplace as the preferred material of choice. AISI also plays a lead role in the development and application of new steels and steelmaking technology. AISI is comprised of 25 member companies, including integrated and electric furnace steelmakers, and 125 associate members who are suppliers to or customers of the steel industry. AISI’s member companies represent over three quarters of both U.S. and North American steel capacity.

 

SMDI grows and maintains the use of steel through strategies that promote cost-effective solutions in the automotive, construction and container markets, as well as for new growth opportunities in emerging steel markets. SMDI investors include:

AK Steel Corporation
ArcelorMittal USA LLC
ArcelorMittal Dofasco
EVRAZ North America
Gerdau
Nucor Corp.
Severstal North America
SSAB America
Steelscape, Inc.
ThyssenKrupp Steel USA, LLC
United States Steel Corp.
USS-POSCO Industries

Source: Steel Market Development Institute

 

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Single-serve packaging for premium wine has zip






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/27/2013 11:17:35 AM





 

Zipz wine

 

Beginning spring 2013, celebrating in style has never been easier with the introduction of Zipz, a new collection of elegant, single-serve wines that takes the premium drinking experience anywhere. 

Using proprietary packaging, each Zipz glass is made from high-quality, food-grade PET plastic that looks and feels like traditional glassware. This innovative packaging allows Zipz wines to be served anywhere standard glassware is not an option, including stadiums, arenas, convention centers, hotel and resort pool areas, and the beach. Zipz wines are also a must-have choice for everyday celebrations, including outdoor barbecues, backyard gatherings, picnics, concerts, sporting events and the like.

Each Zipz glass is covered in a patented Zipz Clean Wrap that keeps the wine fresh and the glass clean from handling, unlike other products on the market today, making Zipz suitable for use in public venues. Enjoying a glass of Zipz is easy: simply pull the tab on the Zipz Clean Wrap to unzip the wrap, remove the lid, snap the lid on the bottom, peel off the Lift ‘n’ Peel seal from Selig Sealing and sip away. Both the Zipz glass and wrap are 100 percent recyclable as well—making Zipz wines stylish and smart.

“The Zipz collection addresses a long-standing need for a high-quality, single-serve wine that can be enjoyed both indoors and out,” notes Pat Scire, president of Zipz Inc. “Response from both consumers and the hospitality industry has been overwhelming, and we look forward to bringing this exciting innovation to wine lovers everywhere,” he adds.

The first offering in the Zipz line is Z Selections, a collection of California wines including Pinot Grigio, Chardonnay, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon varietals, to be followed with additional selections in the coming months. Z Selections will be available nationwide beginning in Summer 2013 at www.zipzwine.com and select locations starting in April 2013 for a suggested retail price of $13.99 for a four-pack, or $3.99 per glass. 

Also, beginning April 1, 2013, Zipz has partnered with another forward-thinking company, Fetzer Vineyards, with the introduction of Fetzer Crimson Red Blend and Quartz White Blend wines in the Zipz glass. The collection will launch exclusively in select Major League Baseball stadiums across the country through Aramark and Centerplate, who have been partners since the inception of Zipz. Initial locations include AT&T Park (CA), Coors Field (CO), Turner Field (GA), Citi Field (NY), Kauffman Stadium (MO), Safeco Field (WA) and Tropicana Field (FL).

Source: Zipz Inc.

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