Ice-cold Coke: World’s first bottle made of water?






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 4:49:07 PM





As the mercury rises, so increases the desire to reach for an ice-cold Coke. But what if that Coke literally came ice-cold?

 

Coke Ice ImageIn Colombia, it does, with Beachside Cokes being served in bottles made from ice. The frozen vessels are true to their glass counterparts, keeping with Coca-Cola’s uniquely shaped contour bottle that includes the iconic Spencerian script lettering etched in ice.

 

To make the special edition Coca-Cola bottles a reality, teams created a new packaging design and production process to manufacture the ice bottles and transport them to hot Colombia beaches. The process starts with pouring micro-filtered water into silicone molds, then freezing the water to-25 °C and filling the molds with Coke.

 

Promising “Fria hasta la ultima gota” or “Cold to the last drop,” the frozen bottles continue to make quite a splash in South America and throughout the advertising world. Beachside, drink servers have sold on average 265 frozen bottles an hour. Ad Week, Mashable and other media outlets have melted for the idea, highlighting the Ogilvy & Mather Columbia innovation for its “cool” factor. In Bilbao, Spain at the Sol Awards, which celebrates the best creativity in Ibero-America, the “Botella de Hielo” or “Ice Bottle” took top honors, winning a Golden Sol Award.

 

Reusable, insulating ‘label’ band

 

Putting aside the accolades, the experiment is meant to delight fans with a refreshing Coca-Cola experience. To ensure those ordering up the iced Cokes don’t walk away with frozen fingers, each bottle is wrapped with a rubber Coke-logoed red band that allows the drinker to hold the sparkling beverage with comfort. Once the bottle is liquefied, the band doubles as a keepsake bracelet fans can wear.

 

No word yet on where the bottles may show up next, but with Coke Open for Summer, introducing new ways of sharing happiness with shareable cans that split in two and personalized 500- and 375-mL PET bottles that call you by name, the next innovation is anyone’s guess.

 

To view a video on this development, click here.

 

Source: The Coca-Cola Company

 

 

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Ice-cold Coke: World’s first bottle made of water?






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 4:49:07 PM





As the mercury rises, so increases the desire to reach for an ice-cold Coke. But what if that Coke literally came ice-cold?

 

Coke Ice ImageIn Colombia, it does, with Beachside Cokes being served in bottles made from ice. The frozen vessels are true to their glass counterparts, keeping with Coca-Cola’s uniquely shaped contour bottle that includes the iconic Spencerian script lettering etched in ice.

 

To make the special edition Coca-Cola bottles a reality, teams created a new packaging design and production process to manufacture the ice bottles and transport them to hot Colombia beaches. The process starts with pouring micro-filtered water into silicone molds, then freezing the water to-25 °C and filling the molds with Coke.

 

Promising “Fria hasta la ultima gota” or “Cold to the last drop,” the frozen bottles continue to make quite a splash in South America and throughout the advertising world. Beachside, drink servers have sold on average 265 frozen bottles an hour. Ad Week, Mashable and other media outlets have melted for the idea, highlighting the Ogilvy & Mather Columbia innovation for its “cool” factor. In Bilbao, Spain at the Sol Awards, which celebrates the best creativity in Ibero-America, the “Botella de Hielo” or “Ice Bottle” took top honors, winning a Golden Sol Award.

 

Reusable, insulating ‘label’ band

 

Putting aside the accolades, the experiment is meant to delight fans with a refreshing Coca-Cola experience. To ensure those ordering up the iced Cokes don’t walk away with frozen fingers, each bottle is wrapped with a rubber Coke-logoed red band that allows the drinker to hold the sparkling beverage with comfort. Once the bottle is liquefied, the band doubles as a keepsake bracelet fans can wear.

 

No word yet on where the bottles may show up next, but with Coke Open for Summer, introducing new ways of sharing happiness with shareable cans that split in two and personalized 500- and 375-mL PET bottles that call you by name, the next innovation is anyone’s guess.

 

To view a video on this development, click here.

 

Source: The Coca-Cola Company

 

 

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Ice-cold Coke: World’s first bottle made of water?






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 4:49:07 PM





As the mercury rises, so increases the desire to reach for an ice-cold Coke. But what if that Coke literally came ice-cold?

 

Coke Ice ImageIn Colombia, it does, with Beachside Cokes being served in bottles made from ice. The frozen vessels are true to their glass counterparts, keeping with Coca-Cola’s uniquely shaped contour bottle that includes the iconic Spencerian script lettering etched in ice.

 

To make the special edition Coca-Cola bottles a reality, teams created a new packaging design and production process to manufacture the ice bottles and transport them to hot Colombia beaches. The process starts with pouring micro-filtered water into silicone molds, then freezing the water to-25 °C and filling the molds with Coke.

 

Promising “Fria hasta la ultima gota” or “Cold to the last drop,” the frozen bottles continue to make quite a splash in South America and throughout the advertising world. Beachside, drink servers have sold on average 265 frozen bottles an hour. Ad Week, Mashable and other media outlets have melted for the idea, highlighting the Ogilvy & Mather Columbia innovation for its “cool” factor. In Bilbao, Spain at the Sol Awards, which celebrates the best creativity in Ibero-America, the “Botella de Hielo” or “Ice Bottle” took top honors, winning a Golden Sol Award.

 

Reusable, insulating ‘label’ band

 

Putting aside the accolades, the experiment is meant to delight fans with a refreshing Coca-Cola experience. To ensure those ordering up the iced Cokes don’t walk away with frozen fingers, each bottle is wrapped with a rubber Coke-logoed red band that allows the drinker to hold the sparkling beverage with comfort. Once the bottle is liquefied, the band doubles as a keepsake bracelet fans can wear.

 

No word yet on where the bottles may show up next, but with Coke Open for Summer, introducing new ways of sharing happiness with shareable cans that split in two and personalized 500- and 375-mL PET bottles that call you by name, the next innovation is anyone’s guess.

 

To view a video on this development, click here.

 

Source: The Coca-Cola Company

 

 

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iSys Label to Show Digital Label Print Solutions at Labelexpo Europe

iSys Label, world leaders in short to mid run label printers, have announced they will be exhibiting their unique digital label printing solutions in booth #12U108 at the upcoming Labelexpo Europe in Brussels, Belgium.

Products to be shown are the APEX 1290, a standalone short to mid run digital label printer and their new desktop digital label solution, the EDGE 850. Designed with the user in mind, these digital label print solutions are suitable for all sorts of applications whether it be custom water bottle labels or stickers for a special event. Innovative features such as quick changeover technology, coupled with full workflow software allows operations to stage and print jobs in minutes rather than hours.

In addition to the hardware, iSys Label will be showing their full featured, easy-to-use label software; EDGE2Print and APEX2Print. This Harlequin RIP software package was developed exclusively for the company’s digital label printers and provides full color management tools and a built-in Pantone Library.

                Software features include:

-          User defined Media Manager & Certified Media Library

-          Rotate (RIProtation), mirror imaging and scaling (bleeds)

-          Nesting (multiple jobs based on the same size graphic)

-          Snap grid for quick imposition on die-cut labels

-          Coverage and cost calculator (per label, per job)

-          Multi-up costing for different graphics printed on the same layout

iSys Label will also be showing their optional variable data software package. Compatible with APEX2Print and EDGE2Print label software programs, iVDP provides the user the ability to combine static and dynamic content to create varying multi-graphic labels containing variable text, images and barcodes. iVDP layouts can be easily set up and configured to run variable portions in both horizontal and vertical dataset formats enabling the user to quickly create highly-targeted, professional digital label designs.

                Variable data software features include:

-          Pre-adjust color registration app and memory management system

-          Rotate images and objects using alignment tools

-          Basic formatting tools such as auto-size, scaling, tab stops and paragraph spacing

-          Import numerous graphic formats including BMP, DCX, DIB, DXF, EPS, GIF, IMG, JPG, PCX, PNG, TGA, TIF, WMF, WPG, PDF, and more

-          Over 400 preformatted, ready-to-use barcode components including QR codes, UPC, Codabar, Code 39s, 93s, and 128s, advanced serialization, and more

-          CSV file data importing

Labelexpo Europe 2013 is set to be the largest in the shows’ 33 year history as it returns to Belgium, September 24-27th, 2013. The event has grown to occupy seven halls at Brussels Expo and is set to cover 31,500sqm and include over 550 exhibitors from across the globe,

About iSys Label
iSys Label is the innovative developer and manufacturer of short to mid run digital label printers that deliver production quality labels print after print. Our focus is on developing customized product configurations to fit our customers’ needs and provide effective solutions that meet their highest expectations.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Something Natural is Taking Flight

All natural flavored sparkling water, Something Natural, has rebranded with a gallery-worthy new design, and a clear focus on female consumers. Something Natural once again partnered with New York design consultancy Little Big Brands to develop the evolution.

“We started to notice a trend amongst our passionate fans via social media,” said Randy Shefshick, creator of Something Natural. “Our consumers have hijacked the brand and are doing all sorts of creative things with our bottle. We saw this as an opportunity to listen to them and enhance the design aesthetic further to shape our brand message and solidify our packaging as art.”

“We’ve always seen this bottle as a canvas of blue sky. The evolution takes that a step further distilling down the original flock of bird design to a single graphic bird that both reinforces the natural promise of the brand and feels more approachable and warm,“ said John Nunziato, creative director, Little Big Brands.

Each element of the packaging was handcrafted, from the hand-drawn typography of the logo to the bird illustrations. Five unique birds were illustrated to set each flavor apart and help provide strong color-coding. The logo is also custom and finishes differently on each SKU as it appears to be a piece of string being pulled by the birds.

“Our bottles have always been a piece of art, and this really takes that idea to the next level, serving as an accessory for the consumer drinking it,” said Shefshick.

Something Natural blends healthful and refreshing qualities of sparkling water with delicious fruit flavors. There are no artificial sweeteners or preservatives and each bottle is just 30 calories. Something Natural is available in: Black Cherry, Blueberry Lemon, Pink Grapefruit, Raspberry Keylime, and Strawberry Peach.

Since launching less than two years ago, Something Natural has gone from limited New England distribution to nationwide coverage at natural food markets and conventional retailers including; Whole Foods, Wegmans, Harris Teeter, Raley’s and Sheetz.

Little Big specializes in strategic brand development and package design. In a world full of artificial, Something Natural is refreshing.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Ice-cold Coke: World’s first bottle made of water?






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 4:49:07 PM





As the mercury rises, so increases the desire to reach for an ice-cold Coke. But what if that Coke literally came ice-cold?

 

Coke Ice ImageIn Colombia, it does, with Beachside Cokes being served in bottles made from ice. The frozen vessels are true to their glass counterparts, keeping with Coca-Cola’s uniquely shaped contour bottle that includes the iconic Spencerian script lettering etched in ice.

 

To make the special edition Coca-Cola bottles a reality, teams created a new packaging design and production process to manufacture the ice bottles and transport them to hot Colombia beaches. The process starts with pouring micro-filtered water into silicone molds, then freezing the water to-25 °C and filling the molds with Coke.

 

Promising “Fria hasta la ultima gota” or “Cold to the last drop,” the frozen bottles continue to make quite a splash in South America and throughout the advertising world. Beachside, drink servers have sold on average 265 frozen bottles an hour. Ad Week, Mashable and other media outlets have melted for the idea, highlighting the Ogilvy & Mather Columbia innovation for its “cool” factor. In Bilbao, Spain at the Sol Awards, which celebrates the best creativity in Ibero-America, the “Botella de Hielo” or “Ice Bottle” took top honors, winning a Golden Sol Award.

 

Reusable, insulating ‘label’ band

 

Putting aside the accolades, the experiment is meant to delight fans with a refreshing Coca-Cola experience. To ensure those ordering up the iced Cokes don’t walk away with frozen fingers, each bottle is wrapped with a rubber Coke-logoed red band that allows the drinker to hold the sparkling beverage with comfort. Once the bottle is liquefied, the band doubles as a keepsake bracelet fans can wear.

 

No word yet on where the bottles may show up next, but with Coke Open for Summer, introducing new ways of sharing happiness with shareable cans that split in two and personalized 500- and 375-mL PET bottles that call you by name, the next innovation is anyone’s guess.

 

To view a video on this development, click here.

 

Source: The Coca-Cola Company

 

 

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Ice-cold Coke: World’s first bottle made of water?






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 4:49:07 PM





As the mercury rises, so increases the desire to reach for an ice-cold Coke. But what if that Coke literally came ice-cold?

 

Coke Ice ImageIn Colombia, it does, with Beachside Cokes being served in bottles made from ice. The frozen vessels are true to their glass counterparts, keeping with Coca-Cola’s uniquely shaped contour bottle that includes the iconic Spencerian script lettering etched in ice.

 

To make the special edition Coca-Cola bottles a reality, teams created a new packaging design and production process to manufacture the ice bottles and transport them to hot Colombia beaches. The process starts with pouring micro-filtered water into silicone molds, then freezing the water to-25 °C and filling the molds with Coke.

 

Promising “Fria hasta la ultima gota” or “Cold to the last drop,” the frozen bottles continue to make quite a splash in South America and throughout the advertising world. Beachside, drink servers have sold on average 265 frozen bottles an hour. Ad Week, Mashable and other media outlets have melted for the idea, highlighting the Ogilvy & Mather Columbia innovation for its “cool” factor. In Bilbao, Spain at the Sol Awards, which celebrates the best creativity in Ibero-America, the “Botella de Hielo” or “Ice Bottle” took top honors, winning a Golden Sol Award.

 

Reusable, insulating ‘label’ band

 

Putting aside the accolades, the experiment is meant to delight fans with a refreshing Coca-Cola experience. To ensure those ordering up the iced Cokes don’t walk away with frozen fingers, each bottle is wrapped with a rubber Coke-logoed red band that allows the drinker to hold the sparkling beverage with comfort. Once the bottle is liquefied, the band doubles as a keepsake bracelet fans can wear.

 

No word yet on where the bottles may show up next, but with Coke Open for Summer, introducing new ways of sharing happiness with shareable cans that split in two and personalized 500- and 375-mL PET bottles that call you by name, the next innovation is anyone’s guess.

 

To view a video on this development, click here.

 

Source: The Coca-Cola Company

 

 

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Tetra Pak commits to renewable LDPE for cartons in Brazil






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 2:50:21 PM





In a first for the carton packaging industry, Tetra Pak announced on June 26 that it plans to sign an agreement with Braskem, the largest thermoplastic resins producer in the Americas, for the supply of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) made from sugar cane to its packaging material factories in Brazil.

 

TetraPak LogoThis breakthrough initiative, which will be limited in scope to Brazil only for the duration of the trial, is scheduled to start during the first quarter of 2014. According to the plan, Tetra Pak will use bio-based LDPE as a component of its packages produced in Brazil. The planned move to bio-based LDPE means that 100 percent of Tetra Pak packages produced in Brazil, about 13 billion, will have up to 82 percent packaging material from renewable sources.

 

“The new agreement to be signed with Braskem demonstrates our commitment to bring environmental innovations to our customers and is a further step in our journey to develop fully renewable packages,” says Tetra Pak president and chief executive officer Dennis Jönsson.

 

Braskem will use ethanol derived from sugar cane to produce ethylene, which is then converted into LDPE. The LDPE made from renewable sugar cane has the same technical properties as LDPE made from fossil sources, and the environmental benefits of being from a renewable source. Braskem biopolymers are known under the trademark “I´m green”.

“The new bio-based I´m green LDPE is as inert, resistant and recyclable as the polyethylene made from fossil sources but, contributes to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during the sugar cane growth process,” says Braskem president Carlos Fadigas. “The expansion of the green products line reinforces our commitment to adding value through sustainable development for the value chain.”

 

Since 2008, the Brazilian paperboard chain of custody is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSCT), which means that all the paper used in the production of Tetra Pak packages comes from forests managed in accordance with responsible forestry management principles.

 

Tetra Pak was the first liquid food packaging supplier to use bio-based plastic in its packaging, launching Tetra Brik Aseptic packages with StreamCapT 1000 produced with bio-based high density polyethylene (HDPE) supplied by Braskem in 2011. Earlier this month the company announced global availability of a bio-based version of LightCapT 30, which uses HDPE made from sugar cane.

 

ABOUT BRASKEM
Braskem is the largest thermoplastic resins producer in the Americas. With 36 industrial plants spread in Brazil, the United States and Germany, the company produces over 16 million tons of thermoplastic resins and other petrochemical products annually. As the largest biopolymer producer in the world, Braskem has capacity to produce 200 thousand tons/year of polyethylene from sugar cane ethanol. Find more information at www.braskem.com.br

 

ABOUT THE FOREST STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL
The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an independent, non-governmental, not for profit organization established to promote the responsible management of the world’s forests. FSC is a unique forum where stakeholders from around the world meet and, through strong multi-stakeholder processes, define essential social and environmental criteria for forest management. These fundamental principles are realized in forests worldwide through FSC certification. Find more information at www.fsc.org

Source: Tetra Pak

 

 

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Calysta Energy and NatureWorks collaborate to transform methane into the lactic acid building block for bioplastics






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Multi-year research and development project is aimed at feedstock diversification, innovatively utilizing methane, a potent greenhouse gas.


Edited by Jack Mans, Plant Operations Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/25/2013 4:52:11 PM





Calysta Energy and NatureWorks have entered into an exclusive, multi-year collaboration to research and develop a practical, world-scale production process for fermenting methane-a potent greenhouse gas-to lactic acid, the building block for Ingeo, lactide intermediates and polymers made from renewable materials. If the collaboration results in the successful commercialization of this first-of-its-kind technology, the cost to produce Ingeo would be structurally lowered, and the wide range of Ingeo based consumer and industrial products could be produced from an even broader set of carbon-based feedstocks, complementary to what is already in use by NatureWorks.

 

A greenhouse gas 20 times more harmful than carbon dioxide, methane is generated by the natural decomposition of plant materials and is a component of natural gas. Methane is also generated from society’s organic wastes and is produced from such activities as waste-water treatment, decomposition within landfills and anaerobic digestion. If successful, the technology could directly access carbon from any of these sources. Determining the feasibility of methane as a commercially viable feedstock for lactic acid may take up to five years, according to NatureWorks.

 

Calysta EnergyFeedstock diversification for Ingeo

“If proven through this R&D collaboration, the new technology could be revolutionary because it will provide alternatives to the current reliance on agricultural feedstocks, and with the direct conversion of methane, it will greatly simplify the number of steps and operations needed to convert carbon into performance consumer products,” said Marc Verbruggen, president and CEO of NatureWorks. “This could structurally lower the cost of producing Ingeo.”

 

Currently, Ingeo relies on carbon from CO2 feedstock that has been fixed or sequestered through photosynthesis into simple plant sugars, known as “first generation materials.” NatureWorks’ flagship facility in Blair, Neb., uses industrially sourced corn starch, while its second facility currently in planning for a location in Southeast Asia will use cane sugar. In parallel with the collaboration, NatureWorks is continuing its broad technology assessment of “second generation” cellulosic sources of carbon. In the case of Southeast Asia, opportunities exist for harvesting cellulosic sugars from bagasse, an abundant lignocellulosic byproduct of sugarcane processing.

 

The research and development collaboration with Calysta Energy relates to NatureWorks strategic interests in feedstock diversification and a structurally simplified, lower cost Ingeo production platform. Calysta Energy is developing its BioGTCT (biological gas-to-chemicals) platform for biological conversion of methane to high value chemicals. For NatureWorks, methane could be an additional feedstock several generations removed from simple plant sugars. The project will wrap up with an evaluation of potential sources of a methane feedstock for commercial scale production of lactic acid.

 

The evaluation will include criteria such as purity, availability, price, location to customers, GHG sequestration potential and environmental and energy impacts. Feedstock diversification supports the organization’s goal of utilizing the most abundant, available and appropriate sources of carbon to produce Ingeo for the local geographic region served by a NatureWorks’ production facility.

 

We are pleased to be partnering with NatureWorks, an industry leader in renewable technology and biopolymer business development,” said Alan Shaw, Ph.D., chairman, president and CEO of Calysta Energy. “Calysta’s proprietary technology enables a novel route from a significant greenhouse gas to high-value industrial chemicals such as lactic acid. This approach demonstrates the power of biology compared to chemical transformation. Specific products, such as lactic acid, would be extremely difficult to make economically from methane using traditional catalysts.

 

“Calysta technology offers NatureWorks a competitive advantage through excellent product performance at a lower cost, and we look forward to a productive collaboration. This exclusive project validates our value proposition of converting existing, proven biological pathways to advantaged feedstocks.”
The companies will share commercialization rights for select products developed under the agreement.

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