High Barrier Packaging Gets Fresh Look in Amcor’s Metal-Free Packaging

Amcor will show AmLite, their latest innovation in metal-free packaging technology, at PackExpo in Las Vegas, Sept.  28 to 30.  AmLite utilises Amcor’s  experience in high barrier coating and film extrusion to create a lightweight, transparent material that offers excellent product protection, a strong seal and improved packaging appearance.

“Brand owners can now easily choose transparent packaging, even for sensitive products,” says Marco Hilty, vice president of strategy and R&D for Amcor Flexibles Europe and Americas. “Packaging that shows the product inside increases consumer trust and the likelihood of purchase. For sensitive products however, this was typically not a practical option, and they were hidden behind aluminium-based or metallised packaging.  AmLite gives packaging designers and marketing teams a cost competitive alternative.”

AmLite was developed using Amcor Barrier Coating, a micro-thin transparent barrier layer that is deposited on a base web. The result is a lightweight material with barrier levels approaching that of aluminium. AmLite also utilises special high performance grades of PE or OPP sealant, for excellent performance on packing machines and a reliable seal.

“AmLite can offer a significant environmental benefit by reducing material use,” says Wojciech Skalbani, global sales and marketing director technical products for Amcor Flexibles Europe & Americas. In a lifecycle assessment, AmLite provided a 40% carbon footprint reduction and 21% weight reduction compared to standard Alu-based materials. “Additionally, it can help our customers ensure product safety by allowing the use of metal detectors after packs are filled and sealed,” said Mr. Skalbani. 

AmLite can be used for a range of ambient wet and dry food products, as well as medical and personal care products like powders and lotions. AmLite also offers excellent sealing properties and a strong seal to create a variety of pack formats, including regular, stand up and spouted pouches, as well as flow packs, sachets, and more.

 

Small packs that talk big come to the aid of seniors

Designing packaging for elderly consumers can be a balancing act, with two of the most important design elements—text legibility and package size—at odds. The tension is especially noticeable in food, beverage, prescription-drug and over-the-counter (OTC) pharmaceutical packaging.

Causing the conflict is the need for both small package sizes and on-pack text that older consumers can read, despite their diminished eyesight. Happily, this issue can be solved with a little creative thinking.

There are reasonable arguments for offering elderly consumers smaller food and beverage packages, including single-serving packs. Many of these consumers live alone or in smaller households than when they were younger. They also may be watching their portion sizes for health reasons.

Smaller food and beverage packs offer elderly consumers the advantages of portion control, convenience, freshness and reduced waste. However, the smaller the package, the smaller the canvas for product information and branding.

Prescription medications and OTC products, by their nature, usually require small packages. They also require federally regulated on-pack information, and often there is so much requisite information that a small font size must be used. However, if the type is too small for consumers to read, they may be putting their health at risk.

 

At the grocery store

One way around the small-font problem is to make photos, illustrations and other graphic elements do the talking.

For food and beverages, especially those positioned as better-for-you, “you’re seeing pictures of the fruit and vegetables that are contained in the product. Those images are very reassuring to people, and especially the elderly, knowing that there’s something in the product that’s good for them. And it’s not small type, which can be incredibly frustrating,” says Tony Bash, vp of sales-beverage at LiDestri Food and Beverage.

Bash adds that “badges” are another high-visibility way to communicate that a product is, for example, all-natural, kosher, low-fat or low-salt. Badges include trusted seals, such as the American Heart Association (AHA) Heart-Check mark and the USDA Organic seal. Badges can be used on a food or beverage package of any size.

A badge is “something apart from the nutrition panel, which is often difficult to read,” Bash says. “A badge can run along the bottom or top of a package or down a spine, and you can see at a glance that the product has two grams of sugar, it’s a 12-oz bottle, there’s no fat in it and it has the organic badge.”

Another tactic is to make the ingredients panel larger, he adds. “We are all doing that, in the food industry, but I think the use of badges and call-outs is a better way to do it for the elderly.”

LiDestri’s Francesco Rinaldi pasta sauce labels are printed with badges and call-outs that vary by stock-keeping unit (SKU). One of the labels sports a gluten-free badge, AHA Heart-Check mark and life’sDHA logo, plus call-outs flagging “Reduced Sodium,” “No Sugar Added” and “FORTIFIED with 32 mg DHA OMEGA 3 per serving.” Note the capitalized words, which draw shoppers’ attention and also make the call-out easy to read.

Bash will share his thoughts in a presentation, “Millennial and Aging Populations: Innovating for Essential Markets,” at PhillyPack this fall. His presentation will be on Oct. 7, 2015, from 10:30 to 11:00 a.m.

 

Prescriptions and OTC

A different approach is needed for prescription and OTC packaging that’s used by older consumers. In some cases, it may be enough to revamp font styling and sizes on these packages, or to add an expanded-content (peel-and-reseal or booklet) label to the bottle or vial. Other times, digital technology linked to the package may be necessary to convey important information.

Of the various tactics to render text on small packages more legible for the elderly, “making the font larger is an obvious one,” says Jennifer Long, an optometrist, Certified Professional Ergonomist and founder of Jennifer Long Visual Ergonomics in Australia. Using all-capitalized letters may also be helpful in some cases, as the Francesco Rinaldi label illustrates.

“Maximizing the contrast is definitely good,” Long adds. “For example, black on white, dark blue on white. Also making the font bold. Color combinations to avoid are red/green and red/blue, as it is difficult to focus on these two colors simultaneously, even for young people. Also avoid color combinations that have similar contrast, like brown on yellow.”

Another approach is to use digital technology to make product information more accessible. This could take the form of an on-pack quick-response (QR) code that takes the consumer to a website with product information.

“When viewed on a digital device, it could be viewed as a larger size,” Long says. Or “the information could be made into an audio file, which is read to the person.”

For prescription drugs, pharmacists can counsel patients face to face, explaining medication dosing and side effects. “When you pick up your package, there’s an opportunity for them to communicate to you in simple language—what are the concerns, and what are some of the best practices when you’re taking this medication,” says Blake McGowan, managing consultant and ergonomics engineer at Humantech Inc.

Pharmacists can also make sure the instructions on a prescription’s primary package are printed legibly and without unnecessary verbiage. A simple directive to take one tablet by mouth once daily, printed in black ink on a white label in a large, easy-to-read font, is both comprehensible and readable.

On some OTC packages, the best bet is to highlight the ailment the medicine treats rather than the brand or type of product. Elderly consumers may not know the difference between aspirin, acetaminophen and ibuprofen, “but they know ‘pain relief,’” McGowan explains.

“A lot of companies are starting to transition their packaging to the very simple—white background, black words, big letters that say ‘pain relief,’” he says. This gives “that older person the ability to identify the outcome they’re looking for from the packaging. It’s not the brand name or the product name, but the outcome.”

Highlighting what an OTC pharmaceutical does rather than what it is—“Arthritis Pain Relief” rather than acetaminophen, for example—helps older consumers choose a product that will provide the benefit they are looking for.

 

Kate Bertrand Connolly is a seasoned freelance writer based in the San Francisco area covering the packaging, food and technology markets. You can contact her at kate.connolly@sbcglobal.net.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/small-packs-that-talk-big-come-to-the-aid-of-seniors1509

U.S. considers options after WTO rejects mandatory country of origin labeling

Not everyone agrees on when and how to act to avoid possible retaliatory measures after the World Trade Organization (WTO) ruled that mandatory country of origin labeling (COOL) requirements for beef, pork and chicken are non-compliant with WTO rules.

The U.S. House passed the Country of Origin Labeling Amendments Act (H.R. 2393), which would repeal mandatory country of origin labeling (COOL) requirements for beef, pork and chicken, and sent the bill the U.S. Senate on June 11, 2015.

The following month, on July 23, 2015, Senators Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and John Hoeven (R-ND) introduced S.1844, which would allow meat and poultry products from animals that are born, raised and harvested in the United States to be labeled as “Product of the U.S.” under a voluntary program.  

As way of background, the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, as amended by the 2002 and 2008 Farm Bills, requires retailers to inform consumers of the country of origin of various meats, fish, shellfish, nuts, fruits and vegetables. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) published an interim final rule on COOL for all covered commodities on Aug. 1, 2008, and a final rule on Jan. 15, 2009. Not long after implementation of the mandatory regulations, Canada and Mexico filed suit with WTO claiming that they discriminated against Canadian and Mexican origin livestock.

WTO determined in 2011 that U.S. COOL requirements resulted in Canadian and Mexican livestock being treated less favorably than U.S. livestock. The U.S. appealed but WTO affirmed in 2012 that U.S. COOL requirements for muscle-cut meat commodities were inconsistent with U.S. obligations under the WTO Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade.

In response to that ruling, USDA amended the COOL requirements in May 2013, to require specific information regarding where animal sources of covered meat products were born, raised and slaughtered.

In 2013, Canada and Mexico again filed a complaint with the WTO, and the organization again ruled—in 2014—in flavor of Canada and Mexico. The U.S. also appealed that ruling but was unsuccessful when on May 18, 2015, the WTO Appellate Body confirmed the earlier finding that the COOL measure accorded less favorable treatment to imported livestock than to like domestic livestock. In particular, the Appellate Body agreed with the WTO panel’s conclusions that the amended COOL measure increases the record-keeping burden for imported livestock. 

A few days after the House voted to repeal COOL requirements for beef, pork and chicken, on June 17, the WTO Dispute Settlement Body (DSB) held a meeting to consider Canada’s request for approximately $2.5 billion in retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. During the meeting, the U.S. referred the issue to arbitration, which will delay the decision for at least 60 more days.

Concern over the possible retaliatory measures spurred calls for repeal of COOL requirements. The Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry held a hearing on COOL and trade retaliation on June 25. At the hearing, committee chairman Senator Pat Roberts (R-KS) referenced a Kansas State University review of the current mandatory COOL regulations that found that compliance had already cost Kansas $500 million. He added that U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that mandatory COOL has cost the U.S. beef, pork and chicken sectors approximately $1.8 billion.

Rep. K. Michael Conaway (R-TX), chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, pointed out that Canadian officials have stated that the voluntary portion of the Senate bill is unacceptable, and he urged the Senate to pass a clean repeal before summer recess. Once that is accomplished, he said he would “commit to working in a bipartisan manner to try and craft a purely voluntary program that is both trade compliant and does not interfere, intentionally or not, with existing labeling programs.”

On the other side of the issue, 142 farm, ranch, environmental and consumer organizations sent a letter on July 28, 2015, to Senators Pat Roberts (R-KS), chairman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, and Stabenow urging them to reject any efforts to repeal the mandatory COOL labeling law and any attempt to create a voluntary program instead. The letter states that since the U.S. “has a sovereign right to allow the dispute process to proceed to it completion, which is months away, and then decide how and whether to implement the adverse [WTO] ruling,” it is premature for Congress act.

The organizations added that WTO can only authorize penalties based on the extent to which COOL caused a reduction in the volume and price of livestock imports, arguing that the economic recession was the driving factor behind declining livestock import, not COOL.

 

Author George Misko is a partner at Keller and Heckman. Founded in 1962, the respected law firm has a broad practice in the areas of regulatory law, litigation and business transactions, serving both domestic and international clients. Reach him at misko@khlaw.com.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/labeling/us-considers-options-after-wto-rejects-mandatory-country-of-origin-labeling1509

High Barrier Packaging Gets Fresh Look in Amcor’s Metal-Free Packaging

Amcor will show AmLite, their latest innovation in metal-free packaging technology, at PackExpo in Las Vegas, Sept.  28 to 30.  AmLite utilises Amcor’s  experience in high barrier coating and film extrusion to create a lightweight, transparent material that offers excellent product protection, a strong seal and improved packaging appearance.

“Brand owners can now easily choose transparent packaging, even for sensitive products,” says Marco Hilty, vice president of strategy and R&D for Amcor Flexibles Europe and Americas. “Packaging that shows the product inside increases consumer trust and the likelihood of purchase. For sensitive products however, this was typically not a practical option, and they were hidden behind aluminium-based or metallised packaging.  AmLite gives packaging designers and marketing teams a cost competitive alternative.”

AmLite was developed using Amcor Barrier Coating, a micro-thin transparent barrier layer that is deposited on a base web. The result is a lightweight material with barrier levels approaching that of aluminium. AmLite also utilises special high performance grades of PE or OPP sealant, for excellent performance on packing machines and a reliable seal.

“AmLite can offer a significant environmental benefit by reducing material use,” says Wojciech Skalbani, global sales and marketing director technical products for Amcor Flexibles Europe & Americas. In a lifecycle assessment, AmLite provided a 40% carbon footprint reduction and 21% weight reduction compared to standard Alu-based materials. “Additionally, it can help our customers ensure product safety by allowing the use of metal detectors after packs are filled and sealed,” said Mr. Skalbani. 

AmLite can be used for a range of ambient wet and dry food products, as well as medical and personal care products like powders and lotions. AmLite also offers excellent sealing properties and a strong seal to create a variety of pack formats, including regular, stand up and spouted pouches, as well as flow packs, sachets, and more.

 

Top 3 adhesive tips for ecommerce packaging

From the product label affixed to the front of the product to the packaging itself, adhesives are everywhere—and the ecommerce industry is certainly no exception. Regardless of if you’re selling steaks, shoes or something completely different, it’s important that you pay attention to the adhesives used in your labeling and packaging procedures.

Choosing the right adhesive will not only help keep your product safe throughout the storage, shipping and delivery phases, but it will also ensure you provide a pleasant end-user experience.

Yet how do you know which adhesives are best for your ecommerce packaging needs? Here are three tips that we’ve gleaned from working with clients across the ecommerce spectrum:

 

1. Consider both bond strength and the user experience: We’ve all felt the frustration of trying to open a package that has too strong of an adhesive bond. By the time you get to the product—ripping the package to shreds and potentially even damaging the product in the process—you feel annoyed and irritated. That’s not exactly the first impression you want to make on a customer, is it?

As you’re selecting an adhesive for your ecommerce packaging, you not only need something that’s durable during the storage, shipping and delivery stages but also one that creates a pleasant user experience at the end consumer. Test different adhesives with your substrates until you find one that offers the right balance.

 

2. Select the right pattern and placement: Your adhesive patterns and placement can make a big difference in creating customer-friendly packaging that opens easily but keeps products intact throughout the shipping process. Once you’ve determined the most effective type of adhesive, pattern and placement, consider using a pattern controller, which will consistently place the same amount of adhesive in the same exact pattern on each package. Though there may be some upfront costs associated with getting the pattern controller installed and running, you can ultimately anticipate lower ongoing costs due to fewer packaging issues, less adhesive waste and faster overall production.

 

3. Be mindful of temperatures: Many adhesives will provide satisfactory performance at room temperature, but far fewer work as well when it comes to temperature extremes. When selecting an adhesive for your product packaging, keep in mind the product that you’re selling and/or the locations to where your product will be shipped.

For example, if you’re selling steaks that will be transported and delivered in dry ice, you’ll want to choose an adhesive that performs well in low temperatures. However, if you tend to ship your products to extremely hot or humid environments, selecting an adhesive that can resist high-moisture levels and high temperatures is in your best interest. Thinking ahead to any temperature extremes your product packaging may encounter can help you proactively prevent packaging issues.

 

The right adhesive for your ecommerce business

Regardless of your ecommerce product, it makes sense to give some thought to the adhesives used in your labeling and packaging phases. Ensure that you choose an adhesive that will keep your product safe during storage and shipping without creating issues for the end user. Consider a pattern controller to cut costs and streamline the packaging process. Also, remember to factor any temperature extremes into your adhesive decision-making process.

By following these tips, you’ll be able to focus on growing your ecommerce business rather than fixing ongoing packaging problems.

 

Pierce Covert is the president of Glue Machinery Corp., a Maryland-based company that builds and stocks industrial strength adhesives and equipment used in a range of industries.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/adhesives/top-3-adhesive-tips-ecommerce-packaging

Crunchies Branding Debuts Refresh

Freeze-dried fruit snacks company Crunchies unveiled a top to bottom branding refresh on Sept. 17. Acquired by global food ingredient company Chaucer Foods in 2014, the brand’s refresh is grounded in an extensive market research study and features an all-new logo, product package, website and marketing campaign to extol the many virtues of freeze-drying.
 

“Our bold, new logo and packaging designs showcase our renewed focus on simplicity, quality and transparency,” says Scott Jacobson, Crunchies’ new L.A.-based CEO. “The decision to display photographs of our freeze-dried fruit on packages, rather than fresh fruit images, is the kind of transparency we felt was missing from the category, and it’s at the core of who we are as company and what our consumers value as well.”
 

Freeze-dried in the U.S. and Europe, with fruits sourced from around the world, all Crunchies products share the company’s hallmark of traceability.

“We source our blueberries and raspberries from small farms in Europe, for example, because of their superior flavor profiles and performance when freeze-dried,” adds Jacobson. “We want our customers to know where their food comes from, and we share that information openly with them.”
 

A new, content-rich storytelling campaign about Crunchies’ product lineup will be highlighted on the company’s revamped, lifestyle-driven website and social media channels, as well as in PR materials throughout the coming months, to promote the brand.

Available in both single-serve packs and larger grab-n-go resealable pouches, Crunchies freeze-dried products contain no added sugar and no artificial flavors or coloring and are non-GMO, gluten-free, vegan, kosher and halal certified. Crunchies’ lineup includes strawberries, mangos, pineapples, blueberries, raspberries, grapes, cinnamon apple, strawberry banana and mixed fruit.

Engineered ingenuity multiplies multipack options

Delkor’s IDS/Process Expo booth displayed multiple multipack variations that improve efficiency and convenience for packaging operations and packages to benefit packagers, retailers and consumers.  

 

The Delkor Systems Inc. booth at the International Dairy Show/Process Expo held last week packed a “multipack” of package design ingenuity into a modest space where four innovative options were featured.

One of these options (available in Q1) is KwikCool, which optimizes in-plant chilling for dairies and other operations by creating large registered-cut openings in shrink-wrapped multipacks of perishable foods (shown below). This permits product-chilling air to efficiently circulate through the multipacks to increase efficiency and reduce cooling times by 20 to 30%.

While that application seems cool enough, that same module can produce an “Easy Tear” strip for multipacks (shown at the top) that notably makes the perforations in the film in the cross-direction. Unlike standard machine-direction perforations that open across the short length of multipacks, the transverse-direction perforations permit a clean, full-length tear-off of the film the length of the package to provide full access to the containers inside. So notes Rick Gessler, the company’s director of marketing and strategic account management. The patent-pending innovation is in beta test, Gessler says.

 

‘Two for one’ specials

Another development was “two for one” film-wrapped multipacks. In this package two or more trays are combined with a single protective top pad and shrink bundled together (shown below). At the store, the film and pad are removed and the trays are separated to provide twice the facings with about half the labor.

 

 Delkor’s patented Twin-Wrap shipper provides two shelf displays from a single shipper.

The idea seems to play off the retail-ready, patents-pending Cabrio case format for flexible packaging that’s more recently been available in twin packs wherein two Cabrio cases are affixed together by a spot glue application and integrated with a single lid. When the lid is removed at retail, the side-by-side cases can be separated into two displays.

According to Gessler, the “one shipper, two displays” format of Cabrio Case has proven high popular for customers like Walmart for twin packs of cased Great Value pouches of shredded cheese. He estimates that currently Cabrio Cases are being produced at a rate of 50 million cases per year for retailers such as Walmart, Aldi, Dollar General & numerous others and across four categories: Snack foods, dressings  and sauces, refrigerated foods and frozen foods.

 

Delkor Systems Inc.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/multipacks/engineered-ingenuity-multiplies-multipack-options

New rigid containers showcase dairy and more

A visit to Process Expo last week revealed a clearer pint for ice cream, a space-saving rectangular container and two fresh aseptic packaging developments that all raise impact at retail.

 

My first few steps into the north hall of McCormick Place, Chicago, at Process Expo last week uncovered a pair of major vendors that both offered a pair of packaging developments. It was a very encouraging start to what turned out to be a productive day.  Each of the foursome provided unique benefits for brand owners looking for optimized, differentiating packaging options for consumers.

My first booth visit was with Berry Plastics where Lauren Piekos, product marketing, rigid open top division, pointed me toward the company’s latest packaging that was clearly different, literally so. A new clarified, freezable grade of polypropylene resin molded into a tapered pint container (seen above) provided impressive shelf appeal for the virtual gelato inside. Piekos said that the new ultra-transparent containers had been launched in July.

In addition to high contact clarity, the new containers featured “Iconic” printing, Berry Plastic’s designation for a high-resolution European-based printing technology that the company has been using over the past 12 months. Described as an “indirect flexographic-printing method,” Iconic uses up to 7 colors and is more economical than in-mold labeling for container decoration, Piekos says. It is applicable to round and nonround containers on white, clear or colored substrates.

Piekos then led me to a development that aims to change the shape of dairy packaging…

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/rigid-containers/new-rigid-containers-showcase-dairy-and-more

Packagers’ response to FSMA poll previewed

What has been the effect of FSMA on brand owners and their packaging operations? Were capital expenditures made or were there staffing adjustments? A check of our live poll sheds some light on the impact.

 

As part of the Food Safety Modernization Act, the Preventive Controls for Human Food rule and Preventive Controls for Animal Food rule are now final, and compliance dates for some businesses begin in September 2016, according to the FDA.gov website. And according to the news released Sept. 10, “the preventive controls final rules announced today are the result of an extensive outreach effort, and incorporate thousands of public comments, including valuable input from farmers, consumers, the food industry and academic experts, to create a flexible and targeted approach to ensuring food safety.”

 

That makes the timing good to share some results from our FSMA poll before we close it later this week (you can still take the poll using the link at bottom), a poll that Packaging Digest conducted to gauge the impact the legislation is having on the packaging industry.

 

While we’ve asked a number of questions that will be revealed when we report on the poll more in-depth next month, one in particular gets to the heart of the matter: What has been your company’s response to FSMA?

 

The results can be seen above, which were roughly split between capital expenditures (we drill down into that in a follow-up question within the poll) and making changes in procedures. Most apparent, though, was that 100% of these companies either added to or changed their training.  

 

The poll remains open this week—we invite you to take it by clicking here.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/food-safety/packagers-response-fsma-poll-previewed

Bud Light courts music-festival goers with mass-customized cans

Mass customization of beverage packaging continues to find applications, most recently in a special edition of 200,000 Bud Light cans. Each 16-oz can is decorated with a shrink sleeve label that has been digitally printed with a unique packaging design.

Brand owner Anheuser-Busch is distributing the Bud Light Festival collection of cans exclusively at this year’s Mad Decent Block Party music events, held throughout the United States and in Canada. The last of the events will occur in Chicago on September 26.

The Festival cans target younger consumers (who are of drinking age), recognizing the millennial generation’s desire for personalized, yet shareable, experiences. The fun, one-of-a-kind package graphics and bold colors energize the designs and amplify the appeal for this demographic.

The packaging’s striking looks also worked to the brand’s advantage beyond the Mad Decent festival circuit. “Consumers responded incredibly well to the Mad Decent Bud Light Festival Cans and propelled interest beyond the Mad Decent fan base by sharing thousands of can images on social media,” says Valerie Toothman, vp-innovation, Anheuser-Busch.

Prime Package & Label managed shrink-sleeve production for the Festival cans. The labels were printed using an HP Indigo WS6800 Digital Press and HP SmartStream Mosaic design software.

Bud Light is purportedly the first brand in the United States to use HP SmartStream Mosaic for mass-customized packaging. The Festival shrink sleeves are printed in six colors, with the brand name on the front and product and legal information printed on the back.

According to HP, the software manipulated 31 custom label designs to create a range of more than 31 million potential shrink-sleeve designs. From these came the final 200,000.

As for the initial 31 designs, “Bud Light commissioned four Mad Decent custom labels and 27 artist-designed labels that capture the energy of the summer music scene,” says Doris Brown-McNally, worldwide brands business development manager at HP.

Previous examples of mass-customized beverage packaging include Coca-Cola Israel’s “Extraordinary Collection” for Diet Coke, which was released last year. Labels for the two million bottles in that special edition were also printed using HP Indigo technology.

And in 2012, Absolut Vodka created the Absolut Unique collection, which included nearly four million uniquely decorated bottles. In that instance, the bottles were directly decorated, not labeled.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/bud-light-courts-music-festival-goers-with-mass-customized-cans1509