Cryogenic storage now at PCI’s Rockford, IL site

PCI Clinical Services has added cryogenic storage capabilities at its Rockford, IL facilities, complementing those currently in place at the company’s Bridgend, UK Center of Excellence for Clinical Trial Services. The expansion supports research and development of cell-based therapies, explains Brian Keesee, Executive Director, Clinical Services at PCI. “Many of these products are in development, but represent an exciting new field of medicine,” he tells PMP News.

“The cryogenic storage is quite versatile and applicable to many fields of biologic research, commonly Advanced Medicinal Therapeutic Products (ATMP),” Keesee continues. “These may be used to support cell- or gene-based therapies and may include master cell banks, stem cells and cell lines, human or animal tissues or tissue engineered products, blood products, or other fluids.”

Cryogenic storage potentially may be needed for some medical devices, too, but Keesee says that his team sees “the initial demand for cell- and tissue-based products.”

The new storage is located at the 93,000-sq-ft Logistics Parkway building on the Rockford campus, which PCI built in 2015 to support clinical trials material storage and distribution. It is one of seven facilities at the Rockford Center of Excellence.

“Having capability both in North America and Europe allows us to support the emerging research community dedicated to advancing these exciting new breakthrough therapies both with logistics as well as site redundancy to help mitigate risk,” Keesee says. “The cryogenic storage is further complemented by storage at -80°C, -40°C, -20°C, and custom storage conditions as required by our clients. We also have extensive storage at 2-8°C for biotech products in the pharmaceutical supply chain, both for investigational/clinical medicines as well as commercial products we package.”

PCI also maintains special packaging capabilities that can be used to support cryogenic storage. “As you would expect, handling of products at cryogenic temperatures does require a significant level of sophistication,” he says. “We are commonly asked to label and prepare materials prior to distribution to the research site.  The materials that we are handling are invaluable and in fact may be the only sample, so our precision and attention to detail are paramount to ensure success.”

PCI’s network includes capabilities for supporting temperature-sensitive drug product at Controlled Ambient 15-25°C; 2-8°C; down to -20°C, -30°C -40°C, -60°C to -90°C; liquid nitrogen vapor phase storage at -196°C for Advanced Therapeutic Medicinal Products (ATMPs); and bespoke refrigerated and frozen temperatures according to client needs.  

“Over the last decade, PCI has been actively involved in expanding its experience and specialized knowledge across the segment of gene therapies, somatic cell therapies and ATMPs,” said Keesee in a news release. “The new facility is an example of our dedication to testing and validating the newest technologies and storage capabilities to ensure they are using the most effective methods for clients.”

“We have a proven track record with dry ice and nitrogen shipping and storage systems, an extensive global distribution network and expertise in handling, storage and distribution of temperature-sensitive products,” he added. “PCI’s continued investment in this area allows our clients to realize a safe and secure supply chain, ensuring their life-saving treatments are stored safely for patients around the world with the highest degree of confidence and assurance.” 

To find out more about PCI, please visit www.pciservices.com.

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For new ideas in packaging, be sure to visit WestPack in Anaheim February 7-9.

 

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/shipping-containers/pmp-cryogenic-storage-now-at-pci-rockford-site-161227

2016 parade of new packages showcases great design

As the New Year dawns, take a virtual tour of all the new packages we published in 2016. Designers, developers, engineers, executives and other packaging professionals looking for ideas will find inspiration and, perhaps, a challenge to do better than what has already been done.

This sortable database compiles photos, captions, summaries and more for 85 new packages published on PackagingDigest.com during 2016. You can sort by 13 different markets, from foods and beverages to personal care products and the emerging cannabis business.

Or scan by posted date to see a chronological parade of packages throughout the year.

Download the searchable Excel document here for free.

We’d appreciate it if you’d let us know in the comments below how useful this document has been for you. Thanks.

 

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Learn what it takes to innovate in the packaging space at WestPack 2017 (Feb. 7-9; Anaheim, CA). Register today!

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/2016-parade-of-new-packages-showcases-great-design-2017-01-02

5 (and a half) packaging trends of 2016

As we count down the days left in 2016, and before we look ahead to next year’s trends, let’s take a look at what we predicted would drive many of your packaging decisions in the last 12 months—from ecommerce needs and the influence of Millennials to the digital revolution and personalization.

Of the dozens of packaging trends that we’ve published at PackagingDigest.com over the last year, here are the ones that scored the highest with the global packaging community, based on page views.

We start with our No.5 trend and work our way up to No.1.

Why five and a half trends, you may ask? We covered trends in food and beverage packaging in two separate articles, each of which got a lot of attention as the No.1 and No.2 articles in this list. So I figured two articles about the same one topic should be worth 1.5 trends. (This is how some editors do math, by the way, in case you ever wondered.)

Photo credit: Illustration above by http://dryicons.com.

 

Trend 5: Ecommerce grows through “unboxing” experiences and “shares”

In his article “5 ways packaging designers can capitalize on the ‘unboxing’ trend,” marketing consultant Adam Wormann says the experience of an individual unboxing their new purchase should be on the mind of every consumer product professional engaged with packaging in any way. Why? Because unique and/or premium packaging helps you stand apart from competitors and encourages social sharing of your brand, which means free advertising. Plus, giving consumers a fond memory of your product means they are more likely to buy from you again.

Wormann goes on to succinctly enumerate his advice on how packaging designers can capitalize on this trend:

1. Leverage Custom Printing: Your packaging should represent who you are, far beyond just your logo.

2. Use Unique Shapes and Sizes: Memorable packages elicit a positive emotion.

3. Select Memorable Packing Material: Think through creative options in materials for a personalized, memorable experience.

4. Go Green: Create a minimalist packaging experience in the interest of environmentalism.

5. Surprise and Delight: Nothing says more to a customer like going beyond what is expected.

 

NEXT: Digital technologies continue to revolutionize packaging

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/optimization/5-and-a-half-packaging-trends-of-2016-2016-12-21

Patented bag design zips ahead with prototypes and more

Prototypes are made of the Zipspout bag, the new name for the Easy Pour bag from inventor Alan Olan that optimizes pouring by locating the pour-spout on the side of the bag rather than the top.

 

We first met inventor Alan Olin of Olin Design Group in an article published last June, A 90-degree twist on reclosable packaging, his optimized, patented design for reclosable packaging that places the reclosure on the side of the package rather than the top. Olin recently informed us that he had prototypes of five Zipspout design variations created along with other updates on his path to commercialization. He sent along the pictures of the prototypes and responds to our questions in this Q&A:

 

First of all, why the name change?

Olin: The main reason I made the name change from the “Easy Pour” bag to the “Zipspout” is because several other companies also use Easy Pour for their branding and I thought it was too confusing. And, I used Zipspout 1, Zipspout 2, etc to help differentiate the assorted bag designs.

 

What can you tell us about these prototypes?

Olin: Virtual Packaging, an M.A. Patterson Co., provided me with great prototype mock-up samples of 5 different variations from my U.S. Patent 8,992,085. Their work was timely, affordable and very professional. 

I presented these mock-ups for the first time at the Global Pouch West Show on December 7th and received several compliments on how great they looked. Also, Olin Design Group has recently changed the business plan and we’ve decided to assign this technology, rather than license it.

Zipspout 1 (shown above) is standup pouch with a tear strip and press-to-close zipper along the upper side of the bag. This is probably the most affordable and most straight forward of the 5 prototype samples.

 

Zipspout 2 is also a standup pouch with a slider zipper along the upper side and a sloped top. This variation is more unique, has better functionality and provides greater product differentiation.

 

Zipspout 3 is a gusseted pouch/bag with a flat bottom and a slider zipper on the side gusset fold. This design allows for more product content, more display area and a truly distinctive look.

Zipspout 4 is another gusseted pouch/bag with a flat bottom, a press to close zipper on the gusset fold and a sloped top. This concept also allows for more product, more display area, is extremely easy to use and one-of-a kind.

 

Zipspout 5 is standup pouch with a slider zipper along the upper side and a built-in handle along the opposite side. This is a special top-of-the-line version that includes the best functionality and greatest product differentiation.

 

Are there other options?

Olin: These five different bag designs do not cover all of the possibilities included in the patent. For example, one could put a slider zipper on Zipspout 1 or a press-to-close zipper on Zipspout 5. There are many options to choose from; any self-supporting type of bag/pouch with a zipper along the upper side is covered by the patent.

 

For what products is the design especially optimized?

Olin:  I believe they would be great for a line of upscale pet food, among other things. Each product could be packaged in one of the variations, while the upper side zipper would provide the common element/feature for the foremost functionality and optimal product differentiation.

 

Olin can be contacted at alan@olindesigngroup.com; the website is www.OlinDesignGroup.com

 

For a machinability evaluation of this invention by several experts posted in July, see Form-fill-seal machinery experts assess the Easy Pour Bag

 

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Explore novel food packaging ideas at WestPack, February 7-9, 2017, in Anaheim, CA

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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/bags/patented-bag-design-zips-forward-prototypes-more1612

Patented bag design zips forward with prototypes and more

Prototypes are made of the Zipspout bag, the new name for the Easy Pour bag from inventor Alan Olan that optimizes pouring by locating the pour-spout on the side of the bag rather than the top.

 

We first met inventor Alan Olin of Olin Design Group in an article published last June, A 90-degree twist on reclosable packaging, his optimized, patented design for reclosable packaging that places the reclosure on the side of the package rather than the top. Olin recently informed us that he had prototypes of five Zipspout design variations created along with other updates on his path to commercialization. He sent along the pictures of the prototypes and responds to our questions in this Q&A:

 

First of all, why the name change?

Olin: The main reason I made the name change from the “Easy Pour” bag to the “Zipspout” is because several other companies also use Easy Pour for their branding and I thought it was too confusing. And, I used Zipspout 1, Zipspout 2, etc to help differentiate the assorted bag designs.

 

What can you tell us about these prototypes?

Olin: Virtual Packaging, an M.A. Patterson Co., provided me with great prototype mock-up samples of 5 different variations from my U.S. Patent 8,992,085. Their work was timely, affordable and very professional. 

I presented these mock-ups for the first time at the Global Pouch West Show on December 7th and received several compliments on how great they looked. Also, Olin Design Group has recently changed the business plan and we’ve decided to assign this technology, rather than license it.

Zipspout 1 (shown above) is standup pouch with a tear strip and press-to-close zipper along the upper side of the bag. This is probably the most affordable and most straight forward of the 5 prototype samples.

 

Zipspout 2 is also a standup pouch with a slider zipper along the upper side and a sloped top. This variation is more unique, has better functionality and provides greater product differentiation.

 

Zipspout 3 is a gusseted pouch/bag with a flat bottom and a slider zipper on the side gusset fold. This design allows for more product content, more display area and a truly distinctive look.

Zipspout 4 is another gusseted pouch/bag with a flat bottom, a press to close zipper on the gusset fold and a sloped top. This concept also allows for more product, more display area, is extremely easy to use and one-of-a kind.

 

Zipspout 5 is standup pouch with a slider zipper along the upper side and a built-in handle along the opposite side. This is a special top-of-the-line version that includes the best functionality and greatest product differentiation.

 

Are there other options?

Olin: These five different bag designs do not cover all of the possibilities included in the patent. For example, one could put a slider zipper on Zipspout 1 or a press-to-close zipper on Zipspout 5. There are many options to choose from; any self-supporting type of bag/pouch with a zipper along the upper side is covered by the patent.

 

For what products is the design especially optimized?

Olin:  I believe they would be great for a line of upscale pet food, among other things. Each product could be packaged in one of the variations, while the upper side zipper would provide the common element/feature for the foremost functionality and optimal product differentiation.

 

Olin can be contacted at alan@olindesigngroup.com; the website is www.OlinDesignGroup.com

 

For a machinability evaluation of this invention by several experts posted in July, see Form-fill-seal machinery experts assess the Easy Pour Bag

 

___________________________________________________________________________________

Explore novel food packaging ideas at WestPack, February 7-9, 2017, in Anaheim, CA

 ___________________________________________________________________________________

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/bags/patented-bag-design-zips-forward-prototypes-more1612

What in the world of food waste and packaging is it?

A new product-focused promotion from AMERIPEN presents some interesting facts about the efficiency of packaging to help reduce food waste. Can you guess what the product is?

 

This packaging quiz is courtesy of a new campaign from AMERIPEN, the American Institute for Packaging and the Environment, to highlight the invaluable role packaging plays to reduce food waste. Along the way the document provides interesting facts along about the carbon footprint—via a life cycle assessment (LCA)—of a common packaged product.

We thought we’d turn it into a quiz to see if our savvy packaging professionals can deduce what it is and we’ll start by noting that as with many food and beverages, it originates on a farm.

Sadly, Americans throw away more than 20% of this product after they bring it home. What a waste at the far end of the value chain, right?  

Two-thirds of that is due to spoilage while the remaining one-third is due to preparation and serving issues.

It turns out that the product’s packaging—about 2oz in weight—is a mere 3.5% of the product’s total carbon footprint as determined by a LCA. Here are some other life-cycle assessment figures from this American staple:

Slightly more than half of the product’s carbon footprint is made in production; and

More than twice as much of its carbon footprint is in its transportation than in its packaging.

Know what it is? Turn the page for the reveal.

 

Photo credit: Designed by Freepik

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Explore fresh food packaging ideas at WestPack, February 7-9, 2017, in Anaheim, CA

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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/food-packaging/what-in-world-foodwaste-reduce-isit1612

Digital printing capability expands to plastic jars

Omega Packaging takes the next step beyond digitally printed caps to bring the production and graphics flexibility of digital printing to round plastic containers.

 

Omega Packaging, La Mirada, CA, has expanded its digital-printing beyond closures to now include full-color CMYK digitally printed round containers in sizes from 0.25oz to 32oz. The technique eliminates labels and gives customers exceptional creative license on packaging graphics and copy.

Company president Jack Oh reveals the colorful, customizable details in this Q&A.

 

What’s the background to this?

Oh: Our customers are increasingly asking us to print on the plastic jars and caps that we make, to provide a turnkey package. While exploring traditional processes like silk-screening, offset, and pad printing, we realized that digital printing was the future, and decided to focus most of our investment in that area. Earlier in 2016, we installed equipment to do full color digital printing on our plastic caps (see Digital printing creates colorful custom closures published in August) and the natural extension of that project was to start digital printing on our jars.

 

What’s the benefit for customers?

Oh: Smaller batch sizes, mass customization, frequent artwork changes, better graphics and product differentiation are some of the market forces that are driving this technology. The lack of tooling like screens or plates allows us to change artwork easily. How else can you take a photo of yourself and immediately print it on a jar? Or print 1,000 jars all with different images?

 

What can you say about the printing equipment?

Oh: Due to the proprietary technology, I’m not able to share too many of the technical details. The process is similar to the digital printing we’ve been doing on our caps, but instead of printing on a flat surface, we’re now printing on the side wall of the container. This requires more sophisticated machinery.

 

Closeup from an early test run in August shows the level of detail possible with 360 dots-per-inch resolution.

What are the print specifications?

Oh: Full-color CMYK printing at 360 dpi with UV-curable inks developed for food and pharma packaging. We can achieve full 360 degree coverage around the container, which is not possible with most other methods. And we’re able to print on more of the jar than traditional processes like silk-screening, offset printing or even by labeling.

 

How do costs compare?

Oh: The cost is similar to a 2-color silk screen. And the number of colors doesn’t affect the price, so we encourage our customers to get more creative with their artwork.

 

What jars and options are available?

Oh: We’re currently offering this service on all of the jars and caps that we make. The smallest container we make is a 1/4oz or 33mm jar; the largest is a 32oz or 120mm container. Due to frequent requests from customers, we’re also starting to explore the option of offering this service even for containers not made by us.

The impact and flexibility of personalization using digital printing is apparent in this custom note and sample jar.

 

What’s been done to date?

Oh: The projects we’ve been working on have mainly been to replace labels, or as a substitute for multi-pass silk-screening or offset applications. The ability to print all the way around the jar without any gaps has been appealing to some customers. And being able to print on more of the jar has allowed us to use larger text for customers struggling to fit all of their ingredients or other information.

 

What graphic file formats are required?

Oh: We accept AI or PDF files. Most customers provide final artwork sized exactly the way they want it, but we’ve also had situations where a customer sends us bits and pieces and we stitch it together. With the ability to print on more of the container than before, we often end up enlarging artwork, especially the tiny text on some of the smaller jars.

 

When did you launch this service?

Oh: We first started shipping digitally printed jars in October. Currently lead-times for printing are about 3 to 4 weeks. We’re adding more equipment to handle growing future demand and to keep turnaround times short. Since we always keep a large quantity of (unprinted) jars in stock, our goal is to provide a complete package to customers within a few weeks of ordering.

 

For more information, visit www.omegapkg.com or the company’s digital printing website page or email sales@omegapkg.com.

 

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/digital-printing/digital-printing-capabality-expands-plastic-jars1612

2016: A year in review for sustainable packaging

2016 started off with high expectations in sustainability after significant commitments were made at the U.N. COP 21 climate talks in Paris. The world seemed ready to change.

Opportunities were outlined for business to contribute to achieving the goals set for the U.S. These included the usual suspects of energy reduction and support for alternative energy—but also included new areas of contribution, including support for recycling, support for food waste reduction, sustainable forest management and reduction of waste to landfill.

This was the first time that the connection was made for many people of the potential impact our industry could have on meeting the COP 21 commitments.

Recycling was under fire in 2015 due to weak markets and low prices. Climate change mitigation was a welcome new way to measure the importance of recycling and recovery. In 2015, EPA announced a bold goal of 50% reduction of food waste by 2030. Diverting food waste from the landfill emerged as a significant way to reduce our carbon footprint.

 

Innovations in sustainable packaging

Innovation and collaboration in the sustainability space is crucial to stay relevant in today’s world. Consumers are pushing our industry to step up our sustainability initiatives, and they want information and transparency.

This October, TruCost was acquired by the S&P Dow Jones Indices. Trucost is a leader in carbon and environmental data and risk analysis. Alex Matturri, CEO of S&P Dow Jones Indices, said in a statement, “The demand for environmental, social and governance (ESG) data and indices is growing. The merger positions the combined entity to satisfy growing market demand through new product development and the portfolio carbon footprinting. This is a strong signal that ESG is increasingly important to the corporate sector investors.”

In the nonprofit sector, we measure success by the impact we make with our resources and how well we deliver on our mission. The Sustainable Packaging Coalition’s mission is: to bring packaging stakeholders together to catalyze actionable improvements to packaging systems and lend an authoritative voice on issues related to packaging sustainability.

This year we experienced growth in all of our programs and launched several new initiatives. How2Recycle membership grew rapidly to more than 60 member companies, whose products comprise thousands of brands, and many members expanded their use of the label across a variety of new packages. This was aided by the release of the Centralized Study on the Availability of Recycling. The study provided new insights into consumer access to recycling and demonstrated that only 53% of Americans have automatic access to curbside.

We launched the How2Compost label and conducted research on the role that compostable packaging can play in food waste diversion from landfill. SPC’s Forest Products Working Group launched a new version of the Environmental Paper Assessment Tool (EPAT 3.0) and partnered with American Forest Foundation to develop a new landscape assurance model for family-owned forests.

This year’s SPC Advance conference was the largest fall event in SPC history. During the event, a number of exciting announcements were made, including an open invitation to attend our new biopolymer event, SPC Bioplastics Converge, and the creation of ASTRX, a partnership with The Recycling Partnership to map barriers and opportunities within the recycling landscape, and to deliver more high-quality recyclables to the supply chain.

 

Brands making a difference

Many of our members announced new packaging goals.

PepsiCo, for example announced a number of new goals in October, including:

• Achieve zero waste to landfill across its direct operations by 2025;

• Reduce the food waste it generates in its direct operations by 50% by 2025; and

• Design 100% of its packaging to be recoverable or recyclable by 2025, while partnering to increase packaging recovery and recycling rates.

At the Walmart Sustainable Packaging Summit in October, Walmart launched a new playbook that focuses on three key areas:

1. Source Sustainably: Maximize recycled and sustainably-sourced renewable content, while enhancing the health of the materials the company uses in its packaging.

2. Optimize Design: Find ways to reduce unnecessary packaging materials, such as extra boxes, ties or layers, while maintaining what is necessary to protect the product.

3. Support Recycling: Increase use of recyclable content, while working to improve infrastructure for hard-to-recycle materials; as well as clearly communicate recyclability using consumer-friendly labels, such as the How2Recycle.

The summit was followed by an additional announcement in November that included new packaging goals. By 2025, Walmart is committed to:

• Achieving zero waste to landfill in Canada, Japan, U.K and the U.S.

• Using 100% recyclable packaging for all private-label brands.

These are significant because they represent the second wave of sustainability goals and specifically address recyclable packaging. In the past, many companies had weak goals around recycled content and recyclability. These new goals—along with the other advancements in the industry over the past year—represent a significant raising of the bar and give us a lot to look forward to as the New Year approaches.

Nina Goodrich, director, Sustainable Packaging Coalition, and executive director, GreenBlue, came to GreenBlue with an industry background in R&D, innovation and sustainability strategy. She believes that innovation and sustainability are linked as key drivers for our future.

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Learn about the latest developments in sustainable packaging at WestPack 2017 (Feb. 7-9; Anaheim, CA). Register today!

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/2016-a-year-in-review-for-sustainable-packaging-2016-12-16