Atkins’ new packaging highlights lifestyle instead of weight loss

Atkins Nutritionals Inc., a leading player in the low-carb nutrition market, has launched a rebranding campaign in which packaging design plays an integral role. The company’s redesigned food packaging started rolling out in late December 2017, followed by an ad campaign featuring a new brand spokesperson: actor Rob Lowe.

The rebranding makes living a healthy lifestyle, rather than dieting, Atkins’ central message. Thus the new packaging design is food-centric, featuring mouthwatering photos of the products while retaining nutritional information.

“We redesigned all packages to focus on the delicious products and provide the information that consumers use to make decisions in an easy, readable graphic treatment,” says Linda Zink, svp of innovation at Atkins.

The company worked with the DuPuis Group to redesign the packaging, and its packaging suppliers have remained the same: All Packaging Co. for cartons; Printpack for film wrappers; Tetra Pak and WestRock for shake containers and the shakes’ paperboard outer wrap, respectively; and PaperWorks Industries for corrugated board.

Zink answers some additional questions about Atkins’ rebranding effort and package redesign.

 

What was the strategy behind Atkins’ rebranding, and how does the new packaging fit in?

Zink: Atkins is a consumer lifestyle brand, and we wanted our packaging to reflect a more contemporized look and feel. Since our research shows that most people are watching their carbs and sugar intake, the Atkins bars and shakes are great snack options for this larger, more lifestyle-focused population—and not limited to those who are solely trying to lose weight.

The new design focuses on the food. People buy food, not messages. We wanted the package to appeal to consumers’ love of food and to help them make choices that easily fit into a low-carb lifestyle.

 

What packaging design changes did you make?

Zink: We wanted to create a modern, cohesive look at shelf and to make it easy for consumers to shop the Atkins line of products and distinguish between our Meal, Snack and Treat segments. The front panel was designed to highlight the food and make the nutrition callouts easy to find and read. The horizontal color band at the top of each package identifies the product segment while creating a strong brand block at shelf and making it easy for consumers to find our products. The back panel now highlights flavors and ingredients and features the hidden sugar story—important nutritional education for our consumers.

 

 

Please explain the new packaging’s visual hierarchy. Why move the callouts from the left side of the package to the upper right?

Zink: The new architecture is food-focused. We wanted to devote more space to the food, while making sure the brand and the nutrition callouts remained strong. This horizontal design creates a strong, color-blocked banner at shelf. And since people naturally read left to right, it makes it even easier to find and read the information that is important to them.

 

Why did you choose to maintain the existing package color schemes?

Zink: We wanted to signal that Atkins has changed while remaining true to our loyal consumers. We didn’t want to create a new color system that could cause confusion at shelf. Our consumers love our products, and we wanted to make it easy for them to find their favorite products within the new graphic treatment.

 

Did the packaging redesign include structural changes?

Zink: We kept the same structure for the vast majority of our product line. We did decide to transition some of our Endulge line that was in a gabletop box to the traditional box used for our other products. This change was primarily done to help with shipping and retail stocking.

 

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Optimize your packaging operations: Advanced Design and Manufacturing (ADM) Expo in Cleveland returns Mar. 7-8, showcasing the latest in robotics, automation, plastics, packaging and design engineering. Find a solution for your packaging project here. Register today!

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/atkins-new-packaging-highlights-lifestyle-instead-of-weight-loss-2018-02-22

Could a tablet’s coating become the ‘package’?

Applied DNA Sciences Inc. is partnering with Colorcon Inc. to develop an on-dose authentication solution. Applied DNA’s SigNature DNA molecular taggants, which have already been incorporated into inks and varnishes for use in package printing, are now being incorporated into Colorcon’s specialty excipients for film coating, inks, and color dispersions for use in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical solid oral dosage forms. Combined with Applied DNA’s encrypted fluorescence technology, the molecular taggants when applied to packaging can be scanned optically under ultraviolet light, the company reports.  

“In the world we are in, we have to think about packaging in a more molecular way,” says Bob Miglani, chief of business development at Applied DNA. “We have to think differently.”

In this solution, “the coating becomes the package and gives you the information,” he tells PMP News. “The ‘molecular bar code’ can tell you whether the tablet is authentic, where it came from, and where it should be going.”

Traditionally, it has been a challenge to secure a tablet without a physical or chemical component, Miglani says. “Not a lot of tablets have inks,” he says.

But a large portion do utilize film coatings, he says. “We did our feasibility studies with Colorcon’s Opadry film coating, which is a thin layer in a range of styles. It is easily dissolvable or can disintegrate, and different properties are available per pharma needs,” he says. “Now we can go to a company and say look, you’re buying it already, and now you can have the molecular tag integrated with it.”

The addition is seamless, he says. “Change is very difficult, and it’s a complex supply chain. We are trying to make it a seamless solution. Essentially, we are blending our taggant into their normal process, so there is greater than 99.999% coating, and less than 0.0001% taggant.”

When asked whether the same molecular tags could be used in all levels, such as in a blister material, on a package varnish, and on the tablet, Miglani says that it depends upon the business need. “We haven’t limited ourselves to thinking of just one code. Some users may want the tag to include the batch number and expiry date. And others may want such codes as backups.”

However, “there is a lot of repackaging done in the United States, so that would be an instance in which the same code on a tablet and package could be useful,” he added.

Applied DNA is continuing its development work, but it has already done several shelf-life studies, and “it’s years,” Miglani says. “In military and other apps in extreme temperatures, it can survive in conditions ranging from -40 degrees to 150 degrees Celsius, and it is still stable. We’re expecting it to perform the same in coatings.” 

The company is currently preparing its Drug Master File now, and SigNature DNA molecular taggants are expected to be classified as a Type IV excipient. The technology has a “self-affirmed GRAS status, backed by a 3rd party GRAS review,” he adds.

To see how pharmaceutical products could be authenticated in the field by pharmacists, please see this video.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/authentication/pmp-could-the-coating-become-the-package-180221

Could a tablet’s coating become the ‘package’?

Applied DNA Sciences Inc. is partnering with Colorcon Inc. to develop an on-dose authentication solution. Applied DNA’s SigNature DNA molecular taggants, which have already been incorporated into inks and varnishes for use in package printing, are now being incorporated into Colorcon’s specialty excipients for film coating, inks, and color dispersions for use in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical solid oral dosage forms. Combined with Applied DNA’s encrypted fluorescence technology, the molecular taggants when applied to packaging can be scanned optically under ultraviolet light, the company reports.  

“In the world we are in, we have to think about packaging in a more molecular way,” says Bob Miglani, chief of business development at Applied DNA. “We have to think differently.”

In this solution, “the coating becomes the package and gives you the information,” he tells PMP News. “The ‘molecular bar code’ can tell you whether the tablet is authentic, where it came from, and where it should be going.”

Traditionally, it has been a challenge to secure a tablet without a physical or chemical component, Miglani says. “Not a lot of tablets have inks,” he says.

But a large portion do utilize film coatings, he says. “We did our feasibility studies with Colorcon’s Opadry film coating, which is a thin layer in a range of styles. It is easily dissolvable or can disintegrate, and different properties are available per pharma needs,” he says. “Now we can go to a company and say look, you’re buying it already, and now you can have the molecular tag integrated with it.”

The addition is seamless, he says. “Change is very difficult, and it’s a complex supply chain. We are trying to make it a seamless solution. Essentially, we are blending our taggant into their normal process, so there is greater than 99.999% coating, and less than 0.0001% taggant.”

When asked whether the same molecular tags could be used in all levels, such as in a blister material, on a package varnish, and on the tablet, Miglani says that it depends upon the business need. “We haven’t limited ourselves to thinking of just one code. Some users may want the tag to include the batch number and expiry date. And others may want such codes as backups.”

However, “there is a lot of repackaging done in the United States, so that would be an instance in which the same code on a tablet and package could be useful,” he added.

Applied DNA is continuing its development work, but it has already done several shelf-life studies, and “it’s years,” Miglani says. “In military and other apps in extreme temperatures, it can survive in conditions ranging from -40 degrees to 150 degrees Celsius, and it is still stable. We’re expecting it to perform the same in coatings.” 

The company is currently preparing its Drug Master File now, and SigNature DNA molecular taggants are expected to be classified as a Type IV excipient. The technology has a “self-affirmed GRAS status, backed by a 3rd party GRAS review,” he adds.

To see how pharmaceutical products could be authenticated in the field by pharmacists, please see this video.

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/authentication/pmp-could-the-coating-become-the-package-180221

Nestlé Waters’ sparkling new packaging signals major rebranding

Rebranding rides the sparkling water surge through a major packaging redesign for 25 SKUs across six regional brands featuring new products, the brand’s debut in cans and a proprietary new bottle. 

 

Consumer thirst for bottled water beverages appears unabated, but which subcategory within the segment is seeing the highest flow? That would be sparkling waters; according to Euromonitor, the sparkling water category grew 70% from 2011-2016 and is expected to reach $3.1 billion by 2022.

Nestlé Waters North America (NWNA), Stamford, CT, is making a timely, bigger splash in that rising market with a major rebranding anchored by all-new packaging that reaches store shelves after mid-March. The brand’s new sparkling water portfolio encompasses regional brands Poland Spring, Deer Park, Zephyrhills, Ozarka, Ice Mountain and Arrowhead and features 10 new flavors, a bold new bottle design and the company’s first canned products.

The new flavors are Lively Lemon, Lemon Lime, Zesty Lime, Orange, Summer Strawberry, Raspberry Lime, Black Cherry, Simply Bubbles, Triple Berry and Pomegranate Lemonade. All flavors are made with natural ingredients, free of calories, sugar, sweeteners and colors to complement the 100% natural spring water.

The regional-driven, nationwide salvo of new products complement NWNA’s established premium sparkling brands Perrier and S.Pellegrino.

“Following rapid growth over the past few years, the sparkling water category is now mature enough for us to make a significant investment in developing this extensive line of mainstream sparkling offerings from our regional spring water brands, each of which is the top-selling still spring water brand in its market,” says Antonio Sciuto, the company’s executive vp and CMO. “As consumers increasingly choose healthy beverages over sugary soft drinks and juices, they are looking for exciting new options. Now is the time to give millions of Americans the sparkling product they have been missing – combining the regional spring water brands they love with delicious natural flavors and added bubbles in both bottles and cans.”

Highlights:
Proprietary bottle design—a sleek, elegant PET bottle design that resembles vintage glass, is more comfortable to hold and highlights the movement of sparkling bubbles;

Eye-catching label—more prominent branding and fruit imagery, as well as a new colored cap to accentuate visual brand cues and distinguish from competitors;
Bold new case pack visuals—vibrant and colorful fruit graphics designed to capture attention on shelf and highlight flavor varieties;
Cans with colorful fruit graphics—offering 12-oz cans, preferred by some customers, in all markets;

Rainbow packs—popular flavor combinations in 24-pack bottles and cans to encourage flavor trial.

With these dramatic changes, Nestlé Waters hopes to nearly double the number of Regional Spring Water Sparkling households by 2020 as compared to the number of households in 2016.

Nestlé Waters was the first to introduce sparkling water to the mainstream in the 1980s with the U.S. introduction of Perrier Sparkling Natural Mineral Water. Many of its Regional Spring Water brands also have long heritage, such as the Poland Spring brand, which dates back to 1845, which uniquely positions the company to tap into the growing sparkling market.

“Consumers are choosing sparkling water at an unprecedented rate,” says Sciuto. “We already have great equity in our Regional Spring Water brands, and we hope that, as our existing customers enter the sparkling category, they will choose our brands first. With our ten great flavor options, they now have a whole new way to enjoy the spring water they love.”

SKU specifics and consumer involvement

Bottle sizes are 20oz, 0.5L and 1L. Available are eight flavors in 6-pack PET multipacks, eight in 8-pack can multipacks, six flavors in 1L, three in 20oz PET and two PET bottle rainbow packs, totaling 25 SKUs per across six regional brands.

That’s according to Susan Chirico, NWNA regional spring water brands packaging manager, who tells Packaging Digest that consumer input was crucial for the rebranding.

“Our new offerings—packaging, cans, flavors, design—were all developed based on consumer insights to create the best flavor profile and sensory experience,” she says. “We referenced extensive market data on emerging flavors across various food categories and analyzed consumer behaviors and attitudes to inform our flavor strategy. Lastly, we tested out our flavor prototypes on our consumer base to gain more insights on consumer preferences.”

 

The new proprietary “bubbly” bottle structure was developed as part of a collaboration between Nestlé Waters, Nestlé’s R&D center in Vittel, France, and Product Ventures, a strategic packaging design agency. It was intended to highlight the movement of sparkling bubbles through a unique upward spiral design that also offers enhanced grip to the consumer.

The design process included further consumer dialogue to develop a structure that embodied the essence of the product. Peter Clarke, Product Ventures’ founder and CEO, says, “translating the effervescence of the product into the silhouette of the package with an optically and tactilely exciting texture creates an evocative and compelling design that is truly unique to the category.”

 

Bottle development details

Packaging Digest learned that Products Ventures’ process entailed visual strategy, concept generation, consumer research, CAD development and prototyping, according to Sarah Palomba, the company’s senior client director. “The consumer research consisted of online ethnographies, in-house iterative qualitative research and multi-region quantitative research. Our incremental prototyping included initial foam modeling and clear-filled Stereo Lithography (SLA) prototypes.”

Cornerstone Strategic Branding of New York City designed the packaging graphics.

“The visual identity is completely new versus our current bottle and were adapted to each pack format accordingly based on consumer insights and print production capabilities,” Chirico points out.

We asked Chirico about the addition of cans, which are a dramatic departure for the until-now-all-bottled water brand.

“We’re introducing Regional Spring Water Sparkling in three different bottle sizes and also in 12-oz cans to suit consumers’ preferences and needs,” she responds. “Among those that prefer cans are consumers who are moving away from carbonated soft drinks, so now we have a healthy and naturally sourced option for them! And we are not moving away from our signature PET bottles, but rather adding an option from which our consumers can enjoy.” 

And, she says, “we manufacture and fill the bottles and cans using an in-line process, which we use for our still products as well.”

 

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ADM Cleveland 2018 showcases the latest in packaging, plastics, robotics, automation and design engineering through 5 integrated events including Pack and PLASTEC. For more information, visit ADM Cleveland.

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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/beverage-packaging/nestle-waters-sparkling-newpg-rebrand-1802

Packaging design opportunities abound in the 4th Dimension

Digital technologies like artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things (IoT) and virtual reality are transforming companies and their relationships with consumers. Applying these and other technologies to the business of packaging offers myriad opportunities for process efficiencies, as well as for consumer engagement.

In his keynote at the upcoming TransPack Forum 2018 (Mar. 20-23, San Diego, CA) organized by the Intl. Safe Transit Assn., Brian Wagner, director of Ameripen (American Institute for Packaging & the Environment) and co-founder and principal of global management and packaging consultancy PTIS LLC, introduces us to the fourth dimension in packaging design.

With more than three decades of experience in packaging, Wagner helps you bring foresight-driven insights to the table. He gives us a preview of what he’ll talk about and why packaging developers and designers need to embrace the opportunities this new era is bringing.

 

What is the 4th Dimension and how is it changing package design?

Wagner: The 2nd Dimension of package design refers to graphics and the 3rd Dimension to structural design. Designers tend to be good at one or the other, not both. All too seldom are package designs created holistically, syncing both with the entire consumer or user brand experience.

Now, to complicate the process further, the 4th Dimension of package design brings the element of digital transformation, and Internet of Things (IoT) or Internet of Packaging (IoP) where the physical and digital worlds collide. Where:

• Package and consumer relationships are mapped together.

• Connected packages become brand-owned digital media.

• We are designing for the end-to-end lifecycle in real time.

 

What is the biggest challenge for packaging designers as we move further into this newer dimension?

Wagner: The biggest challenge I see is that individual functional leads do not see the connected value IoP brings—when value equals real and perceived benefits / investment. Rather they look only at a single element.

IoT is not new—the whole digital transformation began in the 90s—but many still struggle to understand where to get started. We will realize the power when we appreciate that a sensor or chip on or in a package can be much more than a novel AR/VR game. It can enhance the brand relationship with the consumer and retailer, and data and analytics can deliver supply chain efficiencies and effectiveness.  Once we realize all this then will we embrace the 4th Dimension of package design.

Further, it is a challenge to bring together right-brain and left-brain individuals to co-create, leveraging their strengths in creativity and logic. When we do that, it’s an amazing thing. According to a 2017 Forbes article:

78% of IoT providers predict their greatest source of monetization will be from value-added services and maintenance. IoT platforms and technologies [are] ideally positioned to revolutionize business models today, with the study finding sales of value-added services and maintenance having the greatest potential for revenue gains.”

When it comes to accomplishing higher levels of IoT adoption across enterprises, 34% say quantifying business benefits is essential. Being able to evangelize and improve the understanding of IoT benefits (24%), improving security (17%) and attaining greater integration with everyday items (11%) are also foundational to accomplishing higher levels of adoption. Data use and insight will increase as IoT providers recruit more developers, engineers and software architects with big data and analytics expertise.”

 

Who should packaging designers collaborate with the most to find success in the 4th Dimension and why them?

Wagner: Collaboration and resourcing are crucial to success and progress. Traditional designers must collaborate with programmers, analysts and logical thinkers. Some of the leaders in the space are small, entrepreneurial companies, skilled in programming—and often hard for larger companies to even find. Nearly all companies in fast-moving consumer goods (FMCGs) have at least one, and often more, digital agencies they are working with. Most of them are focused on social media, and reaching consumers in the digital world—less so at delivering solutions on the physical product and package side.

Check out all the statistics in that Forbes article.

 

What is the most promising opportunity that the 4th Dimension offers and why?

Wagner: I believe the most promising opportunity will come as “someone” quantifies the value of the 4th Dimension of design as integral to their particular brand—when the sensor on/in pack is more than a novelty, or more than just a supply chain data-tool.

Today, many leading brands are implementing one-off package designs and in-store displays, leveraging the technology. When we look back at the toothpaste category for instance, and Colgate Total incorporating an expensive foil emblem to take over the #1 spot in the category—they could not cost-reduce the pack and remove the foil enhancement. It became a crucial part of its brand—now we walk down that aisle and foil holograms are used across the entire category. They communicate freshness, shine and cleaning. The same can and will happen in the Internet of Packaging, the 4th Dimension of design.

 

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Optimize your packaging operations: Advanced Design and Manufacturing (ADM) Expo in Cleveland returns Mar. 7-8, showcasing the latest in robotics, automation, plastics, packaging and design engineering. Find a solution for your packaging project here. Register today!

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/packaging-design-opportunities-abound-in-the-4th-dimension-2018-02-20

Most food cans no longer use BPA in their linings

At least 90% of today’s food cans have replaced linings that previously contained the controversial chemical bisphenol-A (BPA), according to the Can Manufacturers Institute. This is in reaction to market demands for more options in food safety.

Robert Budway, president of the Can Manufacturers Institute, says, “Can makers and can lining companies take very seriously our responsibility to provide safe, quality packaging that consumers trust. Safety is our number one priority and we’re proud to contribute to a healthy, affordable food supply in a way that reduces food waste and respects the environment.”

Food can linings now are typically made from acrylic and polyester. And all new materials are extensively tested and are cleared by regulatory agencies before being sold in the market. Linings are necessary to prevent the can from corroding, provide a barrier to bacteria and maintain food quality.

As with any packaging material, though, trace levels can migrate into the food contained within, which is why there were health concerns about BPA. Despite reassurances about the safety of BPA from the Food and Drug Administration, some research shows that even trace amounts of BPA might cause problems with reproductive, neurological and immune systems in humans and animals.

The CMI stresses the remarkable safety record of canned foods: “More than 3,000 people die and more than 40,000 are hospitalized from foodborne illnesses every year, yet there has not been a single reported incidence of foodborne illness from the failure of metal packaging in more than 40 years and the consumption of trillions of cans of food.”

Budway answers Packaging Digest’s questions about the development of new food can linings:

 

What is the source of the data that more than 90% of food cans have next-generation linings?

Budway: The Can Manufacturers Institute surveyed the industry, including can makers and can lining companies, to determine this percentage. We believe the percentage is likely somewhat higher than 90, but we erred on the side of caution so as to avoid overstating the progress made.

 

Why does this percentage continue to increase?

Budway: This percentage is increasing because when consumers made clear their preference to move away from BPA, the industry was eager to respond and committed to the research and testing necessary to find high-performing alternatives. Continual research is helping the industry innovate and find new options.

 

Have all these next-gen linings eliminated BPA?

Budway: Yes, all of the new linings are non-BPA.

 

What do you estimate the cost has been to can manufacturers to develop these new linings? How are those costs being handled? Are they being passed on to customers, absorbed, integrated into R&D budgets, something else?

Budway: It would be difficult to calculate the cost to develop these new linings because each company has invested extensively for years in the research and testing necessary to develop new linings. The cost is absorbed as part of doing business in an industry committed to being responsive to consumers and laser-focused on ensuring safety.

 

How do next-generation linings help companies meet sustainability goals?

Budway: Canned foods help to significantly offset food waste, which is the largest component of the landfill stream. It’s estimated that Americans waste 15% to 20% of the fresh fruits and vegetables they purchase every year. Not only do canned foods last longer, the trimmings, such as cores and peels, are used to feed livestock and create compost for healthier soil.

 

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Optimize your packaging operations: Advanced Design and Manufacturing (ADM) Expo in Cleveland returns Mar. 7-8, showcasing the latest in robotics, automation, plastics, packaging and design engineering. Find a solution for your packaging project here. Register today!

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/food-packaging/most-food-cans-no-longer-use-bpa-in-their-linings-2018-02-20