New material promises faster flow wrapping, easy opening

If you can seal your packages faster, chances are you can increase your throughput, a goal of many pharmaceutical and medical product manufacturers today.

For flow-wrapping lines, however, the quick-sealing materials have traditionally used sealants with high-elongation properties that interfere with the desired tear open properties, explains Dwane Hahn, vice president of sales and marketing for Rollprint Packaging Products Inc. “This characteristic often manifests itself with the sealant stretching, not tearing in unison with the polyester and aluminum foil layers,” he says. This is a concern, he adds, because many flow-wrapped products are meant for patients who have dexterity limitations.

For the last few years, Rollprint has been working on a flow-wrapping alternative that could offer both quick sealing and easy opening. At Pack Expo Las Vegas, Rollprint will be unveiling that alternative: Autobahn, a composite that offers “robust sealability,” yet requires minimum effort to tear open, the company reports. The material features a “new coextrusion-coated sealant layer,” Hahn tells PMP News. “We’ve matched foil and polyester with the sealant for an easy-open, quick-seal product. We’ve worked hard to understand how to put the layers together so we can deliver both.” Hermeticity isn’t sacrificed either, he adds.

“We’ve actually had this in the works for about two years,” Hahn continues. “We’ve learned a lot about running materials fast. We’ve also developed a meaningful understanding of how layers in a composite can work together—or against each other, if you do it wrong.”

Autobahn was developed for a range of flow-wrapping applications such as blow-fill-seal vials, diagnostics devices, IV over wrap, and surgical devices. “For blow-fill-seal vial lines, it is all about how fast you can seal the foil,” Hahn explains. “If you can move from 300 cycles (packages) a minute to 400, that is a high throughput achievement and you can justify new highly automated lines.” Rollprint’s objective for this product in 2018 is “to partner with clients that thrive on technology and are willing to push the perceived boundaries of speed limitations with the goal of hitting the marker of 400 packages per minute,” the company shared in a news release.

Rollprint also shared the following feedback from a product line manager at a major pharmaceutical company packaging blow-fill-seal liquid vials: “You turn the flow wrapper on and this Autobahn material just works. We chose Rollprint because we have multiple product changes per day; starts and stops are part of our business model. A must-have for us in the selection process was a material that allows incredible forgiveness without sacrificing the flow wrappers’ maximum speed capability.”

Hahn adds that Autobahn tears open easily without the use of traditional laser or mechanical scoring, which can reduce operating costs.

Autobahn is available in aluminum foil and ClearFoil barrier options. “For UV sensitivity, foil is typically a better choice,” Hahn says. But “ClearFoil can be customized with a UV additive.”

For more details, visit Rollprint at Pack Expo Las Vegas Booth S-6129.

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/flexible-packaging/new-material-promises-faster-flow-wrapping-easy-opening-170920

How the 4th Industrial Revolution will impact packaging, part 1

Sustainable packaging strategies will need to adapt to the massive restructuring of the retail industry, a shifting global logistics infrastructure and a changing notion of consumption itself. Kelly Cramer zooms out—way out—to explain why and how industry can reconsider packaging for the next era of production.

 

The world is changing as we enter the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

You don’t have to look far in the media, or even within your own immediate surroundings, to see that the world is changing by grand leaps―and with haste. Some, such as those at the World Economic Forum, are characterizing the many changes seen in the last few years as the Fourth Industrial Revolution (aka Industry 4.0). Building upon the Third Industrial Revolution of the internet and automation (that is still ongoing), the Fourth Industrial Revolution is marked by advancements that fuse the physical with the digital. Robotics, the Internet of Things (IoT), 3D printing, advanced materials and artificial intelligence are all examples of this. Every industry will be disrupted with a velocity, scope and systems impact that has never been seen before. 

 

Due in part to changing behaviors and desires, consumption is changing.

Among the areas that will be change by this revolution, and that is already changing before our eyes, is the notion of consumption itself. What people are consuming, how and when they’re consuming it, and where the consumption takes place is changing quickly. The astronomical rise of ecommerce is the most obvious aspect of changing consumption, but there are other compelling changes, including the explosion of subscription products, the success of brands with super-fast production cycles and the growth of the sharing economy.

As a result of these new sales channels and an evolving consumer experience, we’re observing greater customization of products, better accessibility to products, the prioritization of convenience, and more engagement between consumers and brands.

 

As consumption is changing, the systems of production are also changing.

Due at least in part to these changes in consumption, we’re observing a fundamental restructuring of the retail industry that is in process right now. What’s happening right now isn’t just “American malls have too much real estate vacancy.” Anyone who sells anything―not just the apparel companies or department stores in headlines―will be impacted by the consumption evolution. The idea of what a store is may change considerably in the coming years as shopping becomes more digitized and multidimensional. Like journalism before it, the consumer packaged goods (CPG) industry will likely get “leaner and meaner.”

The shift in the sale of goods to new channels and consumption habits is very much related to the global shift in logistics. The way things move through our world is being optimized, automated and reshuffled. Additionally, manufacturing and supply chains are becoming smarter, more agile and interconnected.

 

Sustainability is a new standard and expectation in production and consumption.

In addition to systems changing, circular economy and sustainability have become key considerations in the modern business model. The rise of the aspirational consumer (who places high value on environmental responsibility), combined with the disproportionate and unprecedented buying power of the millennial generation (that loves sustainability), means that every day you’re not investing in sustainability you’re losing much longer time down the road to catch up. If you’re able.

 

Because packaging touches all products, and because consumption and production are fundamentally changing, packaging will also fundamentally change.

Packaging is connected to the sale of all products; it is the common material thread between all things sold. Packaging must first and foremost protect the product. If packaging fails and the product gets damaged, you lose the entire capital, environmental and human investment that went into making that product. Often, the “footprint” of packaging is much less than the actual product itself.

For this reason, studying how the packaging relates to and interacts with the product―or in other words, analyzing “the product/packaging system”―is essential to creating sustainable packaging. A package is well-designed so long as the amount of material used in packaging is enough to protect the product but no more.

The role of packaging in the ecommerce channel enables something much different from packaging than traditional retail does. This past spring at the Sustainable Packaging Coalition’s conference SustPack, Dr. Kim Houchens and Brent Nelson of the Amazon packaging sustainability team explained how products that move through Amazon fulfillment are handled on average 20 times, versus the minimum of five for brick-and-mortar retail. And while the product isn’t handled individually until it reaches the shelf at a brick-and-mortar store, in Amazon fulfillment centers, pallets are broken down into individual units much earlier in the process, and re-aggregated into shipping packages for each unique customer order. And because packaging doesn’t move with a certain side facing up in ecommerce, it means that certain fragile products like liquids sometimes need to be packaged differently to prevent leakage. This shows that you’re hiring packaging to do a very different job in ecommerce than you are for traditional retail.

 

The traditional product/packaging system will struggle in the Fourth Industrial Revolution if it doesn’t adapt fast enough to the new demands put on it―but these changes can also set packaging free.

One way that the traditional product/packaging system is falling short in ecommerce is in product damage rates. Amazon is encouraging its vendors to think seriously about avoiding product damage, because it creates a terrible customer experience. Specifically, the etailer has worked with ISTA to develop a test to simulate how packaging moves throughout the Amazon fulfillment process. It includes two hours of vibration, 17 simulated edge corner face drops and a leak integrity test.

Amazon has also developed the Frustration-Free Packaging program to encourage brands to package product in a way that doesn’t require an Amazon box, and can be sent direct to the consumer without being repackaged in the fulfilment centers, potentially helping mitigate damage and also helping save materials.

One could argue that traditional retail in some ways holds sustainable packaging back―because of prevailing marketing conventions. Brands want shelf presence, which may mean excess materials to “increase real estate” and flashy labels or inks that could negatively impact recyclability. But as Amazon has emphasized, expensive “romance” packaging isn’t required to draw the consumer’s attention in ecommerce; it’s the product, not the packaging, that is displayed to consumers online when they buy, so the consumer doesn’t need to touch or feel the packaging to make a purchase decision (packaging functionality, however, is still critical for the consumers’ usage experience). Additionally, the need of theft protection no longer being relevant will also help companies use fewer materials.

Another significant challenge to the traditional product/packaging system is the newer dimensional weight pricing rules from the big carriers like UPS and FedEx that will make it significantly more expensive to ship larger volume packaging (air, that is) direct to the consumer. Changing logistics costs will add complexity to the product/packaging system, but overcoming these challenges will provide significant carbon benefits. In this sense, packaging sustainability will be more tied to logistics sustainability than before.

Another interesting possibility is when and if the need for more sustainable packaging and the cost of logistics ends up changing the products themselves. One classic example is movement toward concentrates to avoid shipping water, but we’re seeing flashes of an exciting new horizon with Amazon’s plunge into microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS). We may not need into ship ice packs if, in the future, we’re eating more food that doesn’t require refrigeration. Packaging will be at the forefront as processing technologies, changes to the products themselves and the tightening of logistics efficiencies dramatically reconfigure the product/packaging/process system.

Part 2 of this series will examine what industry can do about adapting packaging for this next era of production.

 

Kelly Cramer is a project associate at GreenBlue where she works primarily within GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition and one of its fastest growing projects, the How2Recycle Label program. She comes to GreenBlue with a background in public interest advocacy and a J.D. in Environmental Law from Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, OR, as well as a deep passion for writing and design.

 

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Learn about the latest developments in sustainable packaging at MinnPack 2017 (Nov. 8-9; Minneapolis). Register today!

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/how-the-4th-industrial-revolution-will-impact-packaging-part-1-2017-09-20

Sustainable packaging is more important than ever

Sustainability in packaging has never been more important. So say 92% of respondents to the 2017 Sustainable Packaging Study. Now in its tenth year, this annual research provides insights into the trends, issues and concerns of the sustainable packaging community. 2017 is no different.

• Whose job is it to educate consumers on sustainable packaging? Brand owners—89% of them—think they are mostly responsible. How does social media play a role? Download our free 34-page report to find out.

• When it comes to packaging materials, brand owners are currently sourcing more fiber than plastic, but they are more interested in sourcing bio-based or post-consumer recycled plastics. Which markets might be ripe for a switch in packaging materials? We tell you in our data-filled report.

• Most companies (74%) put an emphasis on using recycled-content materials for their packaging. That helps fuel the market for recyclables, which, in turn, feeds the demand for recycled content in a positive economic circle. But companies not using recycled content have some pretty good reasons. We share some of their verbatim comments in our comprehensive report.

The report, which you can download for free below, analyzes the full results of the 2017 Sustainable Packaging Study, which is conducted by Packaging Digest in partnership with the Sustainable Packaging Coalition.

Each year, we ask questions about general trends in packaging sustainability, which give us year-by-year historical statistics. But we also include questions on current hot topics. For 2017, we asked about Packaging Education, Packaging Sourcing and Recycled-Content Packaging (which corresponds to the three bullet points above).

On Thurs., Sept. 14, Packaging Digest and the Sustainable Packaging Coalition (SPC) presented highlights of the survey results in a webinar, which you can now view on-demand. The report contains insights from Packaging Digest; watch the webinar to also hear insights from SPC’s associate director Adam Gendell.

 

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Learn about the latest developments in sustainable packaging at MinnPack 2017 (Nov. 8-9; Minneapolis). Register today!

 

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/sustainable-packaging-is-more-important-than-ever-2017-09-19

Frito-Lay’s Tostitos Lucky Bags put NFL teams in the spotlight

Realizing that game-day traditions and superstitions abound among football fans, Frito-Lay has created a collection of NFL “Lucky Bags” for Tostitos tortilla chips. The limited-time food packaging features the logos of 19 National Football League teams, with one team per bag, and the packaging design launched at the start of the 2017 football season.

To add another layer to the Lucky Bags experience, Frito-Lay printed a smartphone-friendly code on the back of each bag. Consumers snap the codes to access tongue-in-cheek videos featuring Tostitos’ Lucky Bags and NFL players like Dak Prescott of the Dallas Cowboys and Aaron Donald of the Los Angeles Rams.

Pat O’Toole, senior director of marketing, Frito-Lay North America, provides further details on the project.

 

Why create graphics for these 19 teams, out of the 32 in the NFL?

O’Toole: There are so many teams, traditions and rituals in the NFL that it’s difficult to celebrate all of them. For now, Tostitos is working with teams with which PepsiCo has a relationship and will evaluate expanding that list in the future. [Note: PepsiCo is Frito-Lay’s parent company.]

 

Where will the Lucky Bags be available?

O’Toole: Lucky Bags will be available regionally at retailers in team markets. Additionally, starting next month four teams will be available on Amazon in an NFL Ultimate Tailgate pack. The team-specific boxes for the Cowboys, Steelers, Packers and Patriots feature metallized Tostitos film printed with the team logo, plus a team-customized outer box. Suggested retail price is $22.99.

There’s a Lucky Bag inside customized team tailgate boxes along with other Frito-Lay snack products.

 

How long will Lucky Bags be available?

O’Toole: The bags are available now through October.

 

Are the Lucky Bags graphics used on just one stock-keeping unit (SKU)? If so, why this SKU?

O’Toole: Tostitos Lucky Bags graphics are being used only on Original Restaurant Style, our most popular variety.


What is the net weight of the Original Restaurant Style bag?

O’Toole: Each bag weighs approximately 13 ounces.

 

Not everyone who lives in Chicago, for example, is a Bears fan. So who will decide which team bags are sold where: Frito-Lay or retailers?

O’Toole: The bags are being sold regionally, based on the geographic location of the team.

 

Did Frito-Lay need to make special arrangements with the teams to match their team colors on the bags?

O’Toole: Yes, Frito-Lay worked closely with each of the 19 teams to ensure branding, including colors and graphics, were consistent with team guidelines.

 

What kind of code is printed on the back of the bags, to link consumers to Tostitos’ Lucky Bags videos?

O’Toole: A Snapchat Snapcode is on the bottom right-hand corner of each bag. The Snapcode brings consumers to a piece of exclusive content for that team, describing their pre-game rituals and superstitions.

 

Will these bags replace the regular Tostitos packaging or be in addition to it?

O’Toole: These bags will be sold in addition to regular Tostitos packaging.

 

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Learn what it takes to innovate in the packaging space at MinnPack 2017 (Nov. 8-9; Minneapolis). Register today!

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/frito-lays-tostitos-lucky-bags-put-nfl-teams-in-the-spotlight-2017-09-18

Frito-Lay’s Tostitos Lucky Bags put NFL teams in the spotlight

Realizing that game-day traditions and superstitions abound among football fans, Frito-Lay has created a collection of NFL “Lucky Bags” for Tostitos tortilla chips. The limited-time food packaging features the logos of 19 National Football League teams, with one team per bag, and the packaging design launched at the start of the 2017 football season.

To add another layer to the Lucky Bags experience, Frito-Lay printed a smartphone-friendly code on the back of each bag. Consumers snap the codes to access tongue-in-cheek videos featuring Tostitos’ Lucky Bags and NFL players like Dak Prescott of the Dallas Cowboys and Aaron Donald of the Los Angeles Rams.

Pat O’Toole, senior director of marketing, Frito-Lay North America, provides further details on the project.

 

Why create graphics for these 19 teams, out of the 32 in the NFL?

O’Toole: There are so many teams, traditions and rituals in the NFL that it’s difficult to celebrate all of them. For now, Tostitos is working with teams with which PepsiCo has a relationship and will evaluate expanding that list in the future. [Note: PepsiCo is Frito-Lay’s parent company.]

 

Where will the Lucky Bags be available?

O’Toole: Lucky Bags will be available regionally at retailers in team markets. Additionally, starting next month four teams will be available on Amazon in an NFL Ultimate Tailgate pack. The team-specific boxes for the Cowboys, Steelers, Packers and Patriots feature metallized Tostitos film printed with the team logo, plus a team-customized outer box. Suggested retail price is $22.99.

There’s a Lucky Bag inside customized team tailgate boxes along with other Frito-Lay snack products.

 

How long will Lucky Bags be available?

O’Toole: The bags are available now through October.

 

Are the Lucky Bags graphics used on just one stock-keeping unit (SKU)? If so, why this SKU?

O’Toole: Tostitos Lucky Bags graphics are being used only on Original Restaurant Style, our most popular variety.


What is the net weight of the Original Restaurant Style bag?

O’Toole: Each bag weighs approximately 13 ounces.

 

Not everyone who lives in Chicago, for example, is a Bears fan. So who will decide which team bags are sold where: Frito-Lay or retailers?

O’Toole: The bags are being sold regionally, based on the geographic location of the team.

 

Did Frito-Lay need to make special arrangements with the teams to match their team colors on the bags?

O’Toole: Yes, Frito-Lay worked closely with each of the 19 teams to ensure branding, including colors and graphics, were consistent with team guidelines.

 

What kind of code is printed on the back of the bags, to link consumers to Tostitos’ Lucky Bags videos?

O’Toole: A Snapchat Snapcode is on the bottom right-hand corner of each bag. The Snapcode brings consumers to a piece of exclusive content for that team, describing their pre-game rituals and superstitions.

 

Will these bags replace the regular Tostitos packaging or be in addition to it?

O’Toole: These bags will be sold in addition to regular Tostitos packaging.

 

************************************************************************************

Learn what it takes to innovate in the packaging space at MinnPack 2017 (Nov. 8-9; Minneapolis). Register today!

Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/packaging-design/frito-lays-tostitos-lucky-bags-put-nfl-teams-in-the-spotlight-2017-09-18

Study: Consumers see value in biodegradable food packaging

A consumer study on food packaging sustainability in restaurants and grocery stores found keen interest in biodegradability as a Plan B option when recycling isn’t possible.

 

What do consumers really want and expect from companies and brands when it comes to paper and packaging products? The 2017 Paper & Packaging Consumer Trends Report from Asia Pulp and Paper explored this question to gain insight into consumers’ thoughts and preferences through an online survey conducted June 1-4, 2017, among a representative sample of 1,015 U.S. adults 18 years of age and older, comprising 505 males and 510 females. The research specifically looked at the importance of sustainability for paper, food packaging and delivery packaging, and how it influences consumer purchasing behavior.

The first section of the report explored the importance of sustainability in food packaging, specifically in restaurants and grocery store settings as shown in the accompanying graphics. Ian Lifshitz, the vice president of sustainability & stakeholder relations for APP, provided these custom insights for Packaging Digest.

 

What are the main takeaways from the study? What was the biggest surprise?

Lifshitz: More than ever, consumers are demanding sustainable choices when it comes to the way their food is packaged. Because of the many complexities around sustainability and food packaging, consumers are looking for brands to offer a variety of packaging solutions that keep the environment’s well-being in mind.

Our 2017 Paper & Packaging Consumer Trends Report found that consumers ranked biodegradability attributes just as important as sustainability and recyclability attributes. Even more surprising is that 45% of consumers want these brands to offer food packaging that is biodegradable when it cannot be made recyclable.

Many types of food packaging, such as those that hold hot foods and beverages, can be difficult to recycle because they require a polymer barrier coating. Innovations and advances in technology in the packaging industry are changing the way we think about food packaging—including this shift to biodegradable food packaging options. Solutions like biodegradable packaging can keep consumers’ minds at ease, knowing that the packaging will break down naturally over the course of a few weeks.

 

 

What advice do you have for brands and packaging companies?

Lifshitz: We know that in the last five years, the importance of sustainability has risen significantly among consumers. Because of this, it’s so important for brands to first make sure they have an end-to-end sustainability program in place. From there, brands need to make sure they are meeting the sustainability commitments outlined in those programs. Education and awareness of these types of solutions is a big component to this and brands should frequently and closely examine their supply chains to understand whether all elements are meeting the sustainability standards consumers’ demand.

They should also make sure they are communicating clearly to their customers that they are meeting their commitments—one of the best ways to do this is to make sure the labels on their packaging clearly state the sustainable attributes.

To review the full survey findings, please email app@cooperkatz.com.

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Hungry for fresh ideas in packaging and plastics? Join the packaging experience during MinnPack in Minneapolis November 8-9 that’s part of a comprehensive all-in-one 6-event plastics and advanced manufacturing exhibition. For more information, visit MinnPack.

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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/sustainable-packaging/study-consumers-c-value-degradable-food-pkg1709