‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video wins ‘pop’ular vote






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/27/2014 3:50:44 PM





 

Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day

 

To celebrate the 14th Annual Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day, Sealed Air Corp. has announced that Eric Buss and his ‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video have been voted by Bubble Wrap fans as the first-ever inductee into the official Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame located on BubbleWrapFun.com.

 

“We are proud to kick-off the inaugural year of the Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame by honoring Eric Buss and his amazing ‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video as our first ever inductee, as it most exemplifies the passion, fun and creative uses of our iconic packaging material,” says Rohn Shellenberger, business manager for Sealed Air’s Product Care division. “On a day where millions around the globe celebrate Bubble Wrap brand’s invention, Buss’ video represents what this holiday is all about and we are excited to watch him ride his Bubble Wrap Bike straight into the Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame.”

 

Buss won not only the hearts of fans, but also induction into the Hall of Fame by shooting a video in which he creatively fastens a roll of Bubble Wrap brand cushioning in front of the wheel of his bike to make a continuous stream of “pops” as he rides over it. His video rose to “pop”ularity earlier this year, as it amassed more than 1.5 million views on YouTube. Sealed Air selected three finalists for consideration in the Hall of Fame’s inaugural year, including fantastic runners up ‘JoJo’s Bubble Wrap Praise Break’ and ‘Cat vs. Bubble Wrap.’

 

“I love popping Bubble Wrap material as much as anyone… but doing it with my fingers is way too slow for my taste,” Buss says. “I thought, ‘I need more noise, faster.’ What a great country we live in… I’m being awarded for popping Bubble Wrap material with a bike!”

 

In addition to Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day immortality, Eric will be awarded a giant bale of commemorative Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame Bubble Wrap brand protective cushioning. Fans can visit the new Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame at www.BubbleWrapFun.com.


More on Bubble Wrap and Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day
Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day is celebrated every year on the last Monday in January.

 

The originally intended use for Bubble Wrap was entirely different than how it is used today. Inventors Marc Chavannes and Al Fielding originally developed a plastic they hoped to market as textured wallpaper. When that idea did not take off, the inventors began to have some success marketing the product as a greenhouse insulator.

 

Chavannes then realized that Bubble Wrap brand cushioning could be used as an improvement from paper and old newspapers for cushioning fragile items. Once the opportunity was identified, the inventors worked hard on the manufacturing process for Bubble Wrap cushioning in an effort to create an ideal packaging material. After a lot of tinkering, they developed a special, proprietary barrier protection which prevented air from leaking and resulted in the crisp “Pop” that Bubble Wrap brand is famous for.

 

Source: Sealed Air Corp.

 

 

 

 

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Target to give away 1.5 million reusable bags for Earth Day






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/14/2013 9:10:03 AM





 

 

Target reusable bags

In honor of Earth Day, Target will give away 1.5 million reusable bags at stores across the country on Sun., April 21, beginning at 10 a.m., as well as sustainable product coupon books that offer more than $40 in savings.

 

 

Of the 1.5 million reusable bags, 250,000 will also contain samples of sustainable products, including method Dish Soap, Annie’s Bunny Grahams, Seventh Generation Laundry Detergent and Burt’s Bees Moisturizing Cream.

 

Target’s Earth Day giveaway encourages guests to take advantage of Target’s five-cent reusable bag discount (guests receive a five-cent discount for each reusable bag they use when they buy something at the store) and experience a selection of products that are environmentally friendly, while effectively balancing price, performance and convenience.

By providing guests free reusable bags and rewarding them with each use, Target helps guests save money and make small changes that add up to make a big difference. Target is committed to helping guests lead more sustainable lifestyles by providing the right information, tools and incentives to make it easy.

 

Source: Target

 

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Bottled Water versus Water Treatment Systems for Home or Commercial Application

Bottled Water versus Water Treatment Systems for Home or Commercial Application

The rise in popularity of bottled water over the past 2 decades has been an interesting phenomenon. Companies selling bottled water have done a great job marketing it as healthy water, while selling it for approximately 5 cents an ounce versus tap water which costs less than 1 cent per gallon! Marketers of bottled water have convinced us that as compared to tap water, bottled water is pure, superior in taste and far more available.

In recent years, however, bottled water has come under fire as an increasing number of people have learned they’re drinking nothing more than filtered tap water. Coca-Cola’s Dasani and Pepsi’s Aquafina are two very popular examples of this, bottling their water close to their distribution points, rather than from sources we often associate with bottled water such as artesian aquifers or natural springs high up in the mountains.

People have also become aware of the environmental impact, namely the amount of oil required to produce plastic bottles and transport bottled water to your local grocer, not to mention that bottled water produces up to 1.5 million tons of plastic waste per year, with 80% of it simply thrown away instead of being recycled.  And if those weren’t reasons enough, there’s also the controversy surrounding the chemicals found to be leaching from the plastic bottles into the water. Bottled water doesn’t seem so healthy now.

So how do you change people’s perception of tap water, while also providing them with the security the masses have come to associate with bottled water? Install a whole house water filter or commercial water treatment system. Doing so will optimize water quality, help to minimize our reliance on natural resources such as oil and offset our impact on the environment in the transport and disposal of plastic bottles.

Benefits to installing a water treatment system for home or commercial applications include removing disagreeable tastes and odors, including objectionable chlorine, many chemicals and gases, and in some cases it can be effective against microorganisms. In particular, reverse osmosis is highly effective in removing up to 99% of contaminants in water. It removes several impurities from water such as total dissolved solids, turbidity, asbestos, lead and other toxic heavy metals, radium, and many dissolved organics. The process will also remove chlorinated pesticides and most heavier-weight VOCs.

Water treatment and reverse osmosis systems can be implemented for use in housing developments, cosmetic production, food processors, hospitals, remote area drinking water systems, and water stores, just to name a few. So next time you reach for a bottle of water, make sure it’s a reusable bottle (preferably stainless steel), and fill it up with delicious tap water recently purified by your water treatment or reverse osmosis system.

 

Dimewater is a water treatment manufacturer located north of San Diego. The company specializes in designing and constructing products to fit the needs of their customers. Additionally, Dime Water tests water to ensure proper equipment selection and fully tests all membrane-based products prior to shipment. The management team is “hands on” to ensure quality at all stages of design and production along with a familiarity of all products produced. To assist you in selecting the correct process to meet your water treatment needs, as well as receive a free quote, we encourage you to contact us at (760) 734-5798 or use our online request form at http://www.dimewater.com/Commercial-Water-Treatment-Quotation.

 

Article from articlesbase.com

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Recycling of plastic bottles

Recycling of plastic bottles

How many plastic bottles do you throw away per week? Soda, soft drinks and even water now come in plastic bottles. Nowadays, people tend to use more plastic bottles than glass bottles, because they are lighter and easier to use and can be thrown away afterwards.

Even though using plastics has its plus points, there are major negative effects on the environment; plastics contribute to environmental pollution on a major scale. This may sound hard to believe, but around 1.5 million tons of plastic is used every year in the world just to bottle water.

Let us tell you about plastics in detail. The word ‘plastics’ is used to describe a wide variety of resins or polymers with different characteristics.

Do you know what polymers are? Polymers are a long chain of molecules, a group of many units, taking its name from the Greek word ‘poly’ (meaning many) and ‘meros’ (meaning parts or units).

There are two types of plastics; thermoplastics and thermoset plastics. Thermoplastic polymers can be heated and formed repeatedly. The shape of this polymer molecule is linear (in a line) and slightly branched.

This may give you the idea that the molecules can flow under pressure when heated above their melting point.

On the other hand, thermoset polymers undergo a chemical change when they are heated, creating a three-dimensional network. After they are heated and formed once, these molecules cannot be reheated and reformed.

Plastic from a ‘blow-mould’ (the neck of the bottle is narrower than the body) has a slightly different structure from the plastic used in an ‘injection mould’ (where the opening is the widest part of the product). Out of the two types of plastics, thermoplastics are easier to recycle.

Now that we have given an introduction about plastics, let’s consider the PET recycling machine process; this differs according to the type of plastic we use. The next problem is, how do we identify the type?

Before answering that question, if you have a plastic bottle closeby, turn it upside down and see whether there is a number placed inside a chasing arrow sign. Do you know what this number means?

Obviously, it’s not just another useless mark on the bottle. This is known as the plastic identification or PET recycling machine manufacturer code. This code system was created by the Society for the plastic industry in the 1980s. Let us tell you what each number means.

* No. 1 – Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

These plastics are used to produce soda and water containers, some water-proof packaging and tennis balls.

* No. 2 – High-density Polyethylene (PE)

These plastics are used to make milk, detergent and oil bottles, toys and plastic bags.

* No. 3 – Vinyl/Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

Food wrap and water pipes are manufactured from these plastics.

* No. 4 – Low-density Polyethylene

Many plastic bags, shrink wrap and garment bags are made using these plastics.

* No. 5 – Polypropene

Refrigerated containers, bottle tops and chairs are manufactured from these plastics.

* No. 6 – Polystyrene

These plastics are used for meat packaging, throwaway packaging and protective packaging.

* No. 7 – Other usually layered or mixed plastics

There is no PET recycling machine potential for these plastics. They must be discarded.

Out of these types, only PET recycling machine and PE can be recycled. Though PET recycling machine is not done on a major scale in Sri Lanka, we have a few small scale PET recycling plants here.

Recently, we visited one such PET bottle PET recycling machine plant at Boralesgamuwa.

“We do not follow a complex recycling process here. We turn these bottles into another ingredient and export it to China,” said the owner of the recycling plant, Anura Jasenthuliyana.

According to Jasenthuliyana, they get around 20-30 tons of bottles per month through scavengers who collect these bottles from garbage dumps in the Colombo City. When the bottles reach the PET recycling machine plant, they are sorted out.

“We get only PET bottles, so, we don’t have to worry about the type of plastic. We just sort the bottles according to their colours”, said Jasenthuliyana.

“The darker the bottle, the lower its selling price. When reusing these bottles, manufacturers can use any colour for the clear bottles, whereas for the shaded bottles, there’s not much of an option; they can either use the same colour or go for black,” he explained. After the bottles are sorted out, they will be put into a machine and crushed to small pieces.

We are exporting these pieces to China, where they will be melted and used to make polyester fabrics”, he said. Fabric made using these bottles is strong, warm and durable.

The only problem with this fabric is that it doesn’t have a glossy finish, instead it come with a matt finish. Five PET recycling machine manufacturer bottles yield enough fibre for one extra large t-shirt, while 25 two-litre bottles can produce a sweater. PET is also spun like cotton candy to make fibre filling for pillows and quilts. It can also be rolled into clear sheets or ribbon to produce VCR and audio cassettes. Most products which are manufactured from recycled material can’t be recycled for the second time.

“I operate this PET recycling machine plant as a social service, to help keep the city clean. I request the public to help us in this course. What they can do is, sort out the plastics in their households and hand them over to a plastic collection centre,” said Jasenthuliyana.

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