Improve health and waste nothing: The Elemental Essentialz formula






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Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/14/2013 1:02:16 PM





 

Theresa HarrisTheresa HarrisTheresa Harris, founder/CEO of Elemental Essentialz, presents her unique sustainability-driven insights Tues., June 18, from 1:00 – 2:45 p.m. as part of the EastPack seminar series. For more information or to register for the conference or the show, visit www.eastpackshow.com.

 

As a chemistry teacher and former developmental specialist, Theresa saw firsthand the increase in developmental delays and disorders. Along with research linking chemicals found in our homes to an increase in various health issues, she felt an obligation to take what she knew and formulate cleaners that were both safe and effective.

 

Additional research led her to the realization that her customers were also concerned with consumption levels and waste production. The rebel in her itched to upset the status quo, and she decided to take on both issues, making it her mission to “Improve Health & Waste Nothing.”

 

Packaging Digest asked her to share insider information on her approach to business and packaging.

 

Q: What was your hobby and how was that propelled into a growing business?
A: Cake Pops (cake on a stick)! Unfortunately my teenage sons and I ate them faster than I could make them, and I realized I needed a hobby that nurtured my creativity, not my waistline. Around the same time I happened upon an article about the dangers of certain chemicals in cleaning products. I was shocked to learn the ingredients in household cleaners did not have to be listed in their entirety. I decided to make homemade cleaners that weren’t dangerous for my family. In doing so, I had three priorities, that they needed to be safe, smell nice and be pretty. 

I started with used wine bottles because they were beautiful and free! As an aside, it turned out that many high school teachers enjoy a glass of wine at the end of the day. I was proud of my little sets of cleaners and started sharing them with friends and family. The response was amazing…and here we are!

 

Q: What are the essentials of your “waste nothing” approach?
A:
Our approach is to bridge the gap between knowing what is right and being able to achieve it. Our customers want to consume and waste less. They do not want to negatively impact our planet. Current efforts to help make this happen, including improvements in packaging, are often “invisible” to consumers. That’s not to say those efforts aren’t admirable. The impact of these changes on our planet is positive and significant, but the customer doesn’t get to “feel” they are making their own contribution. By packaging in refillable and reusable glass bottles, we make it easy for our customers to feel good about joining the mission to “Reuse for Zero Waste.”

 

Q: Why has this resonated with retailers and consumers?
A:
Ultimately, we are making it easy for our customers to feel better about how they are treating our planet. Our products are safe, beautiful and, simply by purchasing their first bottles, consumers can “waste nothing.” The ambiguity over how, where or even if our bottles can be recycled is a non-issue and our customers never have to feel guilty about adding another empty household cleaner to our landfills or oceans. For retailers, I think they recognize the priority consumers are now placing on reducing waste. Providing a new and unique solution for their customers is an obvious win-win.

 

Q: What is one piece of advice you can share with consumer packaged goods companies?
A:
I feel funny offering advice to an industry to which I am still so very new, especially since I feel much of our success came about almost accidently. By hard work, yes. But a brilliant and calculated packaging plan, no. 

I’ll explain why I think that’s important. We chose wine bottles because they were pretty and, in the beginning, free. We started allowing our customers to refill them to save money—ours and theirs. Fast forward almost two years…our packaging approach is now considered by many to be sustainable and innovative. Thankfully, these are two good qualities to have these days. 

Looking back, I just wanted to make something that was safe and beautiful and the package was always part of the product. 

My advice would be, when considering a new package, treat it as part of the product, not separate from it, not something to be discarded. Ask yourself, is it safe? Is it beautiful? And will it always be? If the answer is no, I guess I would ask, what can be done to change that? 

 

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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MWV’s Avive Wins Compliance Package of the Year Award

MeadWestvaco Corporation (NYSE: MWV), a global leader in packaging and packaging solutions, today announced that its Avive multiple-medication patient adherence solution received  the Compliance Package of the Year award from the Healthcare Compliance Packaging Council (HCPC). Patient adherence to prescribed medication regimens is a global challenge, and research shows that approximately half of all patients across the globe do not take their medicines as directed. 

Avive is a patient-customized solution that simplifies daily dosing for customers on multiple medications. It was developed with input from patients and pharmacists. This ready-to-dispense, script-filling pharmacy service is designed to increase medication adherence, provide convenience for patients and allow more time for pharmacist-customer counseling. An HCPC awards judge noted that Avive “truly brings us to a personalized medication approach.”

The development of Avive is an output of MWV’s long-standing commitment to further awareness of the challenges of medication non-adherence, to understand the underlying causes and to provide solutions to help patients effectively follow their regimens. Studies indicate that medication packaging can play a unique and effective role in patient adherence, reinforcing important information about how to take medications correctly on each and every use. Additional research shows that script synchronization and regimen customization, part of the Avive system, also positively impact patient adherence.

“At MWV, we take a research-based approach to developing medication packaging, performing in-depth consumer research and product development, then building evidence that our solutions provide impact, including enhancing patient adherence,” said MWV’s Tom Grinnan, senior director, Global Patient Adherence. “We strive to revolutionize the way patients interact with the medicine they need to be healthy. In our research, we learned from patients and pharmacists that maintaining adherence while on multiple medications can be overwhelming. Weekly pill organizers don’t solve the issue. Avive simplifies the process and allows pharmacists the time they need to counsel patients, and also provides patients more time to enjoy their lives.”

Developed jointly with LTCPCMS, Inc., MWV’s pharmacy innovation partner, the Avive system synchronizes patients’ medications, so all prescriptions are picked up on the same day each month from a single pharmacy. The system also creates a customized regimen specifically for each person, which consolidates dosing times consistent with Universal Medication Schedules and aligns with patients’ current daily habits for ease of integration. Medication dispensing is completed in a central-fill location through a combination of pharmacist oversight and a highly accurate robotic system. It arrives at the local pharmacy ready to dispense, following a final inspection from the pharmacist.

Each Avive package features a month’s supply of pre-filled medication packets, labeled with medication names and dosing instructions for the medications inside. The Avive system also includes patient education information with the container. Using this system helps the patient incorporate their medication routines into their daily lifestyle, providing convenience and helping reduce medication errors.

Avive is one of five MWV adherence solutions that HCPC has recognized in the last three Compliance Package of the Year Awards. MWV solutions, together with our partners, have won HCPC’s top award three times in the past three years and the second runner up award twice, including this year. This year’s second runner up is the Strattera Physician Sample, packed in MWV’s Dosepak by AndersonBrecon for Eli Lilly. This is a titration pack that includes a color-coded, calendared dosing format and patient education materials. In further supporting patient compliance, the Strattera design identifies dosing instructions including tips to avoid side effects and identifying optimal daily timing for doses.  The pack also directs patients to a supporting website to seek further information and prescription savings.  A medication guide is included for the patient in the cover panel of the Dosepak sleeve.                                                                 

About MWV
MeadWestvaco Corporation (NYSE: MWV) is a global packaging company providing innovative solutions to the world’s most admired brands in the healthcare, beauty and personal care, food , beverage, home and garden,  tobacco, and agricultural industries. The company also produces specialty chemicals for the automotive, energy, and infrastructure industries and maximizes the value of its land holdings through forestry operations, property development and land sales. MWV’s network of 125 facilities and 16,000 employees spans North America, South America, Europe and Asia. The company has been recognized for financial performance and environmental stewardship with a place on the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index every year since 2005.

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