Hands-on Team Player

Q&A with:

Peter DiDonato, owner of DiDonato Design

Judy Dixon, vice president of production at Hornall Anderson

Terri Goldstein, CEO of The Goldstein Group

Pamela Long, director of client services at Little Big Brands

John Nunziato, founder and creative director of Little Big Brands

Faster and cheaper has been the business directive from time immemorial. This desire, Little Big Brands’ founder and creative director John Nunziato says, is fueling a disturbing modern trend in package design. “Because of timing and cost being hero, people are approving PDFs as proofs,” he explains. “This type of proofing will most likely result in a client who’s disappointed when the product gets printed because they’ve seen the image in a very different way,” Nunziato says, noting that packages printed on white ink look different from prints on white paper and very different from images viewed on screen. A physical prototype can more clearly communicate concepts and how the package will look in different retail environments.

A prototype also lets everyone involved in the process, including the designer, brand manager and retail buyer, examine the concept closely.
A consumer packaged goods company understands the proposed direction much earlier in the process as well. “The ability to actually hold a prototype or walk up to it—depending on the project—really accentuates the detail,” Hornall Anderson’s vice president of production Judy Dixon notes. “It’s amazing how many details you realize about a design concept once you see it in 3-D.”

Nunziato adds, “That [the prototype review stage] is when the brand manager really starts to fall in love with the design idea. A prototype gives them a real package that they can go to the store with and put on the shelf. They can keep it around at eye level. They can send it to other people for review.

“It’s also easier for clients to be able to visualize type and color tweaks compared to a 3-D rendering or even a lay flat,” he adds. “A prototype can spur more creativity from the client side. I think it can even lead to some buy in from their side and result in a few more dollars invested in the project because they can see just how beautiful the brand’s going to look.”

To make sure that designers and brand managers are getting the most out of their prototypes, Little Big Brands’ director of client services Pamela Long recommends using a service that’s flexible enough to partner on some of the decisions. “They need to be able to roll with the changes,” she remarks.

Nunziato warns that designers should avoid services that “just receive a file, run it and say, ‘Well, that’s what we received.’” Prototyping services with this philosophy don’t add to the creative process. “I believe creativity continues from the agency to the prototypers to prepress to the printers,” Nunziato explains. “But I believe some of them are not using their creativity. So you want to make sure the prototype house you’re using is asking lots of questions. You want to make sure that the prototyper is invested in the client’s brand as much as you are because they’re a part of the project now and not just a piece of the process.”

That’s why Terri Goldstein, CEO of The Goldstein Group, lists service, a consultative approach and knowledge of retail environments as her top three criteria for choosing a prototype house. A commitment to customer service will help ensure that the prototype house will not only manufacture a viable prototype but also will build a plan for the packaging supplier for making the final packages. A consultative approach helps an agency get the most out of the technical expertise of the prototype house. Knowledge of the retail environment will help ensure that the package design’s intent is met despite how the package is displayed.

Goldstein explains that a good prototype house can then contribute to the design process by making sure that the best substrates and coatings are chosen for the project. “Often a brand can be sitting on the bottom shelf or way up on the top,” she says. “A prototype house that truly understands the retail environment can note how elements might look darker on a shelf or what parts of the design are likely to be covered by shelf tags. A good prototype house also keeps up with the latest technologies and substrates so they can make suggestions that adjust for these conditions.” These suggestions can have a great impact on the efficacy of the final design.

That’s why Peter DiDonato, owner of DiDonato Design, says the first and the topmost question he asks himself when choosing a prototyper is, “Do I trust them?”

“Yes, you have to consider price and quality,” he adds. “But it really comes down to the person you’re working with.”

When you trust that person, Nunziato says, you know that everyone is working toward the same goal. “I trust that they’re a business that’s invested in building beautiful brands with our agency,” he explains. “As a business owner and creative director, I believe it’s important to let creative people be creative. I try to find the ‘specialness’ in a brand and in my team, and, of course, manage expectations.”

Goldstein adds that businesses can quickly reap the financial rewards from a good design-firm and prototype-house relationship. “A good prototype service paints a picture of how colors are met with exact formulas, how blends are achieved, basically how everything is broken down,” she says. “When a client goes to their package printer with a prototype from a great comp house, they don’t have to stay at the printer for two, 15-hour days. They simply say, ‘Here’s the target and here’s how you hit it.’

“My mandate is never to let a design go out of my studio without a comp that the client has signed off on and the formula to hit that target,” Goldstein remarks. “That’s how you get great brands that look as good on shelf as the phase one concept the client fell in love with.”

A peek behind the curtain
In our December 2013 issue, Package Design will showcase prototype services companies as well as manufacturers
of prototyping equipment in a product and services focus on prototyping. Here’s a sneak peak at some of the early submissions:

Manufacturing Target Development
guyconti.com
Guy Conti Art & Design Inc. specializes in package design exploration and development. Specialties include folding carton, tube, jar, bottle, box and bag prototyping. Package decorating and finishing options include foil stamping, custom embossing, custom spraying, chrome finishing, shrink wrapping, laser die-cutting, custom dry transfer and silk screening. The firm can also create digital proofs and prepare mechanicals and production targets.

Packaging Prototypes
www.sgkinc.com
Schawk’s brand deployment packaging prototype services range from providing comps for “live” local market tests in-store, to production comps used to sell new products at retail, to hero comps suitable for media exposure and public relations opportunities. SGK can produce a wide range of CPG prototypes, comps and sales samples, particularly for the food, beverage, health and drug industries including: both rigid and flexible packaging, comprising cartons, pouches and shrink labels, which can be produced using clear, white and metallized substrates, along with heat shrinkable films.

Complex Prototypes
www.bridgepremedia.com 
Bridge Premedia prototypes allow clients to reproduce metallics, white ink, spot varnishes, and embossing effects on production substrates such as shrink overwrap film, shrink sleeves, foil, paperboard, biaxially oriented PP, PET and corrugated board. Prototypes offered include cartons, pouches, shrink label and overwrap, rapid prototyping of jar and bottle structures, and interactive virtual prototyping.

Food Packaging Prototypes
printsure.com
As a digital printer of FDA-approved food packaging, PrintSure can manufacture prototype pouches, cartons and shrink sleeves that can be used for direct or indirect contact with food.

3-D Structural Prototypes
www.ibcshell.com
IBC Shell produces 3-D printed prototypes on a Cimquest fused deposition modeler to communicate the beauty and confirm the functionality of packaging concepts. The 3-D CAD Buildware can transform design concepts into complex, finished decorated prototypes that can also incorporate moving components.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Product Focus: Smart & Active Packaging

SUBSCRIBE

To our print and digital magazine, e-newsletter and more…

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Eco&Pack with ‘Gauguin’ Technology Makes its Mark in Dairy

SUBSCRIBE

To our print and digital magazine, e-newsletter and more…

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Giro Snow Helmet & Goggle Packaging

SUBSCRIBE

To our print and digital magazine, e-newsletter and more…

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Soft & Dri Partners with Play for P.I.N.K. to Benefit Breast Cancer Research

Newhall Laboratories announced that its Soft & Dri brand is partnering with Play for P.I.N.K., a non-profit organization that raises funds for breast cancer research. Beginning July 1, sales of specially-marked Soft & Dri stick and aerosol products sold in North America will support a $10,000 donation to the organization.

In addition to being featured on-pack, the Play for P.I.N.K. logo was prominent in a Soft & Dri ad distributed in Sunday newspapers nationwide on 7/28. The partnership will also be prominently called out on Soft & Dri’s and Play for P.I.N.K.’s websites.

“We are honored to support the vital efforts of Play for P.I.N.K., whose steadfast dedication to funding breast cancer research we have long admired,” said Jon Achenbaum, Newhall Laboratories’ CEO.  “Soft & Dri stands for confidence, a value that naturally aligns with Play for P.I.N.K.’s resolve to make ‘breast cancer’ a term referred to solely in past tense.”

“As a brand long trusted by millions of women, Soft & Dri is an ideal partner for our organization” said Stephanie Hamburger, executive director of Play for P.I.N.K. “Soft & Dri’s products help women feel confident and beautiful. At Play for P.I.N.K., our efforts aim to create a world where women can feel confident knowing they can live their lives without the specter of a disease that has impacted the lives of far too many.”

Soft & Dri currently offers four types of deodorants including Aerosol Antiperspirant, Dri Gel Antiperspirant, Clear Glide Antiperspirant, Aluminum Free Deodorant and Stripe Antiperspirant Sticks (in Canada only). Every Soft & Dri product helps women feel confident by keeping them dry and fresh all day long.

Soft & Dri products with the Play for P.I.N.K. logo will be available starting in August. For more information, please visit www.softndri.com.

About Play for P.I.N.K.
Play for P.I.N.K. (Prevention, Immediate diagnosis, New technology, Knowledge) is a grassroots organization dedicated to raising funds for breast cancer research, by creating and promoting awareness of breast cancer through sporting and lifestyle events. Our commitment is to contribute 100% of all monies raised to our sole beneficiary, The Breast Cancer Research Foundation.  Since 1996, Play for P.I.N.K. has donated nearly $30 million to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Play for P.I.N.K. currently holds events in 27 states with an estimated 30,000 annual participants. For additional information, please visit www.playforpink.org.

About Newhall Laboratories
Soft & Dri owner Newhall Laboratories (a Brynwood Partners company) acquires and reinvigorates classic personal care and beauty brands, bringing deep consumer marketing, product innovation and retail expertise to some of America’s most trusted brands. LA Looks, Dep, Thicker Fuller Hair, Zero Frizz, Pure & Natural and La Bella are among the company’s other brands.  For more information, please visit www.newhalllabs.com.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pack & Gift 2013: Promotions at the heart of brand strategy

SUBSCRIBE

To our print and digital magazine, e-newsletter and more…

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Dairy industry life-cycle analysis results (video)






RSS

Reprints/License

Print

Email










Posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/18/2013 12:11:20 PM





 

Gail Barnes

 

 

Gail Barnes, partner, Personify, speaks with Lisa McTigue Pierce, executive editor of Packaging Digest, at the 2013 Global Food & Beverage Packaging Summit about some surprising results from a dairy industry life-cycle analysis study, which Barnes covered in her presentation on Day 1 at the conference.

 

Click here to watch the video on Packaging Digest’s YouTube site.

 

 

.

 







RSS

Reprints/License

Print

Email





    We would love your feedback!

Post a comment






No related content found.





»MORE











Canon Resource Center






Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523513-Dairy_industry_life_cycle_analysis_results_video_.php?rssid=20538

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Improve health and waste nothing: The Elemental Essentialz formula






RSS

Reprints/License

Print

Email










Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/14/2013 1:02:16 PM





 

Theresa HarrisTheresa HarrisTheresa Harris, founder/CEO of Elemental Essentialz, presents her unique sustainability-driven insights Tues., June 18, from 1:00 – 2:45 p.m. as part of the EastPack seminar series. For more information or to register for the conference or the show, visit www.eastpackshow.com.

 

As a chemistry teacher and former developmental specialist, Theresa saw firsthand the increase in developmental delays and disorders. Along with research linking chemicals found in our homes to an increase in various health issues, she felt an obligation to take what she knew and formulate cleaners that were both safe and effective.

 

Additional research led her to the realization that her customers were also concerned with consumption levels and waste production. The rebel in her itched to upset the status quo, and she decided to take on both issues, making it her mission to “Improve Health & Waste Nothing.”

 

Packaging Digest asked her to share insider information on her approach to business and packaging.

 

Q: What was your hobby and how was that propelled into a growing business?
A: Cake Pops (cake on a stick)! Unfortunately my teenage sons and I ate them faster than I could make them, and I realized I needed a hobby that nurtured my creativity, not my waistline. Around the same time I happened upon an article about the dangers of certain chemicals in cleaning products. I was shocked to learn the ingredients in household cleaners did not have to be listed in their entirety. I decided to make homemade cleaners that weren’t dangerous for my family. In doing so, I had three priorities, that they needed to be safe, smell nice and be pretty. 

I started with used wine bottles because they were beautiful and free! As an aside, it turned out that many high school teachers enjoy a glass of wine at the end of the day. I was proud of my little sets of cleaners and started sharing them with friends and family. The response was amazing…and here we are!

 

Q: What are the essentials of your “waste nothing” approach?
A:
Our approach is to bridge the gap between knowing what is right and being able to achieve it. Our customers want to consume and waste less. They do not want to negatively impact our planet. Current efforts to help make this happen, including improvements in packaging, are often “invisible” to consumers. That’s not to say those efforts aren’t admirable. The impact of these changes on our planet is positive and significant, but the customer doesn’t get to “feel” they are making their own contribution. By packaging in refillable and reusable glass bottles, we make it easy for our customers to feel good about joining the mission to “Reuse for Zero Waste.”

 

Q: Why has this resonated with retailers and consumers?
A:
Ultimately, we are making it easy for our customers to feel better about how they are treating our planet. Our products are safe, beautiful and, simply by purchasing their first bottles, consumers can “waste nothing.” The ambiguity over how, where or even if our bottles can be recycled is a non-issue and our customers never have to feel guilty about adding another empty household cleaner to our landfills or oceans. For retailers, I think they recognize the priority consumers are now placing on reducing waste. Providing a new and unique solution for their customers is an obvious win-win.

 

Q: What is one piece of advice you can share with consumer packaged goods companies?
A:
I feel funny offering advice to an industry to which I am still so very new, especially since I feel much of our success came about almost accidently. By hard work, yes. But a brilliant and calculated packaging plan, no. 

I’ll explain why I think that’s important. We chose wine bottles because they were pretty and, in the beginning, free. We started allowing our customers to refill them to save money—ours and theirs. Fast forward almost two years…our packaging approach is now considered by many to be sustainable and innovative. Thankfully, these are two good qualities to have these days. 

Looking back, I just wanted to make something that was safe and beautiful and the package was always part of the product. 

My advice would be, when considering a new package, treat it as part of the product, not separate from it, not something to be discarded. Ask yourself, is it safe? Is it beautiful? And will it always be? If the answer is no, I guess I would ask, what can be done to change that? 

 

.







RSS

Reprints/License

Print

Email





    We would love your feedback!

Post a comment






No related content found.





»MORE











Canon Resource Center






Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523414-Improve_health_and_waste_nothing_The_Elemental_Essentialz_formula.php?rssid=20538

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Package’s Custom ‘Squeeze & Measure’ Closure Cleans up for Libman

SUBSCRIBE

To our print and digital magazine, e-newsletter and more…

Technorati Tags: , , ,

P&W Designs Tesco Finest Roast & Ground Coffee Bags

SUBSCRIBE

To our print and digital magazine, e-newsletter and more…

Technorati Tags: , , ,