Shrink films






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/26/2013 10:57:52 AM





 


Bemis TITAN

 

Bemis Performance Packaging, a leading supplier of flexible packaging and labeling solutions, announces the launch of Bemis TITAN brand beverage shrink films and shrink labels. Bemis TITAN shrink films and labels are designed to enhance beverage packaging quality, efficiency and brand appeal using Bemis’s advanced polyethylene shrink technology. The films create vibrant, sustainable shrink multi-packs that replace corrugate, paperboard or plastic rings, while the colorful, form-fitting labels deliver brand advantage for everything from uniform rounds to contoured shapes.

 

Multi-packs made with Bemis TITAN shrink films reduce material weight by 50 percent and decrease packaging costs up to 30 percent compared to paperboard. Packagers can calculate the bottom-line impact of switching to environmentally responsible, printed multi-pack shrink films using the Bemis “green calculator” found at BemisPerformancePackaging.com/Calc. The calculator provides a quick snapshot of CO2 emission reduction; labor hours saved in material handling; and the number of trucks that could be taken off the road by replacing paperboard with lightweight shrink film. Space-saving Bemis TITAN shrink films and labels are more efficient throughout the supply chain, whether reducing deliveries to consumer goods producers, maximizing warehouse space or eliminating costly disposal of paper-based products for retailers.

 

A leader in helping brands transition to lightweight, high-strength, visually compelling shrink packaging, Bemis works closely with customers to develop solutions that optimize Bemis TITAN shrink technology for their individual applications. The result is cost-effective, protective packaging with stunning shelf appeal that connects with consumers. 


Bemis TITAN Shrink Films & Shrink Labels 2-2-2-2

The Bemis TITAN offering includes line extensions that help brands further differentiate and promote their beverage products. Examples include shrink film multi-packs with optional handles in various configurations; tight-fitting, high-shrink roll-fed labels; Bemis WavePack corrugate-free multi-packs, Bemis PerfPack tear-away multi-packs; and many more. Packagers can learn more by visiting the newly launched BemisPerformancePackaging.com. The new website provides user-friendly resources to address packaging challenges and create brand advantages with the latest in packaging innovations.

Representing quality, strength, integrity and value, Bemis TITAN shrink films and labels will be on display at Pack Expo in Las Vegas, NV, September 23-25, 2013, in Booth #C-558.

 

Source: Bemis Performance Packaging

 

 

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Big Wood Brewery Launches Four Premium Craft Beers in Rexam Cans

Big Wood Brewery, a bold new player on the craft beer scene gaining notoriety for its distinctive brews, has launched four of its award-winning craft beers in cans. Jack Savage, Morning Wood, Bark Bite and Bad Axe are available now in Rexam 16 oz. cans.

Jack Savage American Pale Ale is made from all American hops, while Morning Wood Coffee Stout is brewed with Fuggle, Cascade hops and hints of oatmeal and chocolate. Bark Bite India Pale Ale is brewed with citrus hops and delivers a big refreshing bite. Bad Axe Imperial IPA mixes Columbus and Centennial hops for a pale amber that goes down easy. Big Wood beers have already won numerous awards and accolades.

“We always knew we wanted to launch our unique craft beers in cans,” said Jason Medvec, president, Big Wood Brewery. “Cans provide complete protection from light that helps preserve freshness. They also offer us a lot more space to tell our branding story. Through our partnership with Rexam, we have the perfect package for our beers.”

Big Wood Brewery also benefits from the many additional advantages of cans including portability, durability and the fact that cans are the most sustainable beverage packaging choice in the world, as they are recycled at more than double the rate of any other beverage package.

Rich Grimley, president and CEO, Rexam BCNA, commented on the can as the ideal choice for craft beers. “Our cans are a great way for Big Wood Brewery to bring its unique craft beers to the masses,” he said. “They enable the brand to attract attention on store shelves with colorful, reflective graphics while also securing beverage integrity by keeping out the light. Cans just make good business sense as well with superior recycling, filling, distribution and retail display economics.”

Big Wood Brewery beers in cans are currently available at bars, restaurants and retailers across Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota.

About Big Wood Brewery    
Founded in 2009, and based in White Bear Lake, Minnesota, Big Wood Brewery is a licensed production brewery that produces distinctive craft brews for distribution throughout the Midwest. Touting its edgy yet playful brand image and unforgettable name among its most distinguishing factors, Big Wood Brewery recognizes that to stand out, consumers need to be torn away from normalcy. The company’s unique name is a tribute to the wooded landscape of its home state of Minnesota.

About Rexam
Rexam is a global consumer packaging company. We are one of the leading global beverage can makers and a major global player in rigid plastic packaging for healthcare applications. We are business partners to some of the world’s most famous and successful consumer brands. Our vision is to be the best global consumer packaging company.

We have 67 plants in 24 countries and employ 11,100 people. Our sales from ongoing operations in 2012 were in the region of $7 billion. Rexam is a member of the FTSE 100 and its ordinary shares are listed with the U.K. Listing Authority and trade on the London Stock Exchange under the symbol REX.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Dairy industry life-cycle analysis results (video)






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Posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/18/2013 12:11:20 PM





 

Gail Barnes

 

 

Gail Barnes, partner, Personify, speaks with Lisa McTigue Pierce, executive editor of Packaging Digest, at the 2013 Global Food & Beverage Packaging Summit about some surprising results from a dairy industry life-cycle analysis study, which Barnes covered in her presentation on Day 1 at the conference.

 

Click here to watch the video on Packaging Digest’s YouTube site.

 

 

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Packaging is the gateway to a deeper conversation about sustainability






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Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/15/2013 9:58:11 AM





Jim HannaJim HannaHow do you use packaging to communicate your sustainable strategy to customers? Come and find out.

 

On July 17, 2013, Jim Hanna, director, environmental impact, Starbucks Coffee Co., will speak at the Packaging Digest Global Food & Beverage Packaging Summit conference in Chicago. His topic: “How we build successful sustainable packaging.”

 

Here, he gives us a preview of some key points in his presentation. For more information about the conference and/or to register, visit www.fbpackaging.com.

 

Q: What is the Starbucks approach to sustainable design in packaging?

Hanna: Our approach is to focus on the entire life cycle of the packaging from raw material sourcing all the way to end of life and to where we can use the life cycle approach assessment to determine the true sustainability of packaging. A lot of folks focus on materials or on end of life specifically. As a company that is focusing pretty heavily on climate change as one of our primary environmental drivers, the climate footprint of our packaging is one of the essential pieces that we take a hard look at.

 

Q: Why is this holistic approach so successful?


Hanna:
It’s successful because it’s credible. Unfortunately, there’s still lot of green washing in sustainable packaging out there. Our approach is agnostic to type of material. It looks really at where the true inputs are going into manufacturing and packaging. How do we design packaging in the best way to not only reduce all the environmental impacts of it but make it appropriate for existing end-of-life management infrastructures out there? 

We’re not a company that has a zero-waste goal because zero-waste goals are often the distraction from reality. We will always create some waste. We’re not a company that focuses on landfill diversion as the only definition of sustainable packaging because, again, landfill diversion doesn’t necessarily equate to environmental efficacy or environmental mitigation. We try to take a credible, long term approach and not get trapped into a lot of the fads and trends we see out there today, which play a role at raising awareness of the issues of packaging’s footprint—but often don’t tell the complete story by locking on to one specific metric of a package’s sustainability. 

Also, we’ve always taken a collaborative approach to defining sustainable packaging because, if we’re going to be successful as an industry, we have to be working together as an industry to create the necessary scale and break down some of the largest barriers to issues like waste management and harmonization of materials. We’ve done number of initiatives over the years that have brought stakeholders into the room from up and down the entire value chain to create a sense of thinking like an integrated system toward a common purpose.

 

Q: Why do you think it’s beneficial to engage the community in your sustainability efforts?


Hanna:
When we define our community, it’s the 60 million people that walk through our doors as customers every week, it’s the places where we operate our stores and the impact that we have on those towns, as well as the place that we hold within those communities as a contributor to their livelihoods. It’s also the nearly 200,000 partners that put on the green apron as employees of Starbucks every day.

Finally, we see our community as the stakeholders who have influence in our company and are keen on how our company operates because of the size and the ubiquity of our brand and the reach it has on a global scale. Whatever their area of focus, these stakeholders have a key interest in the betterment of our world and they are looking to corporate leaders to solve these tough global issues. 

If we’re not engaged with those folks, then we’re not relevant with them. Obviously, from a customer base, that impacts sales. But from a community base, it impacts the place that we hold within those neighborhoods, and our ability to operate successfully within them. It’s beneficial for every company to be directly engaged with their communities—however they define them—because it’s critical to their success.

 

Q: How do your customers influence your sustainable packaging initiatives? 


Hanna:
That’s an interesting question because often I think that we, as companies, aren’t necessarily aligned with what our customers expect from us around sustainable packaging. 

Here’s a good example: We were the first large company in the world to take the use of food-contact post-consumer fiber to scale. With our supply chain partners, we went through the challenges of getting FDA approval (to the FDA, “approval” is defined as a “no objection”) for food-contact post-consumer fiber. It took us a number of years to make that happen and, although we’re still one of the only companies out there using post-consumer fiber at scale for food contact in our hot paper cups, we haven’t necessarily seen a significant resonance within a customer base around that leadership model. 

You don’t see customers out there asking “Why are you only 10 percent PCF Starbucks? You really should increase that to 20, 30, 40, 50 percent” or whatever the number is. 

Consumers, especially in the U.S. and Canada, define sustainable packaging by focusing on end of life. That’s caused us to focus a lot of effort and resources into creating solutions for our packaging because we know that’s what resonates most with our customers. Yes, we work to mitigate the footprint of our packaging from cradle to grave. But we need to realize that our customers, and most consumers, are locked in on end-of-life as their definition of sustainable packaging today.

We need to create solutions for our customers so we can have broader conversations about the true sustainability of packaging and about the sustainability of our businesses. 

Here’s another example: Around 75 percent of our environmental footprint comes from the operation of our stores. Three years ago, we made a commitment to reduce that operating footprint and set out to build every company-owned store in the world to be LEED-certified. If you’re familiar with the challenges of the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED certification system, that’s a really big deal. That being said, if you ask any customer what is Starbucks’ greatest environmental footprint, most of them will assume it’s our cups. 

I always jokingly say, I would much rather customers come into our stores and say ‘I choose to shop at Starbucks because you guys have this super-efficient HVAC system, because as a conscious consumer, I get that this is where the rubber hits the road when we talk about Starbucks’ environmental impact and good for you guys for addressing it!’ 

I know to even attempt to get to that point, what we’re going to have to do is solve for the most pressing and prominent issue in their eyes-which is our packaging. It’s essential that we at Starbucks, and that we as an industry that’s using single-serve packaging, solve these end-of-life issues for our customers regardless of the contribution they make to our total footprint, so that we can shift the conversation to more pressing environmental issues.

If you look at the global problems we face around environmental degradation, climate change, water scarcity and other pressing issues, citizens and consumers have to be focused on what really matters if they are to play an impactful role in shifting the direction of current negative environmental trends. It’s our job as businesses to help them understand where the real impacts lie and how the choices they make every day as consumers have a huge impact on the environment. 

If we as a business sector are just placating their current perception of environmental impact—which we often do, unfortunately—we’re not going to be able to cross that hurdle to really focus on solving the true and massive environmental issues we face. Yes, we cannot downplay the importance of solid waste management, including the impact that recycling and diversion have on climate change. But the conversation can’t end here.

 

Q: How can packaging help show a brand’s commitment to environmental responsibility? How can your packaging communicate all of what you just said? 


Hanna:
Packaging is that tangible, touchable, seeable thing that is our first and primary touch point with our customers. Packaging must tell the right story to begin the conversation around sustainability. 

Packaging is the starting point and is the gateway to great conversations. It’s essential that we get that part right because that puts our customers and consumers on the path of either trusting the brands they’re using or not trusting them. If we can build that level of trust, if we’re doing the right thing around packaging, then that gives us the ability to engage in deeper conversation around our total environmental footprint and how our customers can play a role in driving that impact down by “voting” with their dollar. 

Addressing end-of-life specifically, and how we should think about brands’ “responsibility,” it’s no longer acceptable for the business community to simply accept a lack of recycling infrastructure in the communities where they operate or assume that we have no influence in driving development of that infrastructure to move our single serve packaging out of the landfill pipeline. We know the necessary pieces in solving the infrastructure puzzle, including market development, material optimization, creating material scale for recyclers to invest in their capacities, along with local policies that catalyze the factors and drive consumer behaviors. But, frankly, we don’t tap into the power we have as a business community to proactively impact local environmental policy.

 

Sure, we are great at playing defense and activating our trade associations to (rightly) oppose material bans or Draconian fees on packaging. But we’ve never been effective at sitting down with local lawmakers ahead of time to hash out good policy that drives infrastructure development and acceptance of our products into recycling streams, leaving us vulnerable to bans, fees, extended producer responsibility (EPR) and other last-resort policies to divert our products from landfills. We need to take a second look at our engagement strategies as an industry.

For example, I can’t tell you how many cities I’ve gone to that, when I walk in their doors, they weren’t accepting Starbucks cups into the recycling system at either the commercial or residential level. By educating and helping policy makers understand that our business goals actually aligned with the city’s/county’s environmental goals, and by aligning all of the players within the local recycling “system” we’ve been able to break through those barriers in a number of cities and get our cups accepted. What we can’t do is sit on the sideline and just throw up our hands and say “The infrastructure or the markets don’t exist”—because it’s our job to make sure that, if they don’t exist, we do everything we can to drive those markets. 

That was a longwinded answer to how packaging can demonstrate brands’ environmental leadership, but that’s really one of our commitments here at Starbucks: To lead the initiative to ensure that our packaging, and our industry’s packaging, is able to reduce its environmental footprint in every way from cradle, to use, to end of life.

 

Q: How does Starbucks balance the need for packaging that’s eco-responsible with packaging that fulfills the consumer’s desire for convenience? 


Hanna:
We try to take a holistic approach to our packaging in a way that, rather than focusing on the packaging, it focuses on the needs. Starbucks’ need is to deliver the best cup of coffee we can to our customers in a way that creates brand connection and elevates the experience for our customers every day beyond what our competitors can do. 

We’ve taken the approach of focusing on our packaging goals from a broader perspective of how to deliver this great cup of coffee to our customers in a way that reduces our environmental footprint while enhancing (or at least maintaining) their experience. 

We have a three-pronged approach at Starbucks. 

Number one is—and this may not sound too exciting to the folks in the single-serve packaging industry—we’re trying to get our customers to use fewer of our paper and plastic cups. We have a program to incentivize people to bring their own reusable cups into our stores. When they do that, we’ll wash it for them and prepare their beverage in those cups, whether it’s a tumbler or a travel mug and we’ll give the customers a discount for their efforts. We have a target at Starbucks that, by 2015, 5 percent of all of our transactions occur with customers who bring in their own reusable mugs.

Unfortunately, we’ve hovered around 2 percent since the inception of the incentive program. The numbers dance around that a bit, but that’s been where we’ve been locked in for years. What we discovered is that the discount we offer is great, but it’s only a driver for a limited number of consumers. Most consumers are bringing in their own mugs because they simply enjoy the beverage that way or they have their own sense of environmental consciousness and this is how they’re doing their part every day to reduce their environmental footprint, regardless of whether or not they get a discount. 

It’s also a convenience issue, as carrying around a big bulky mug that may or may not be clean or may have been sitting in your car for a week, often negatively impact people’s ability or choice to bring in their own reusable mugs. 

In January 2013, we introduced a new concept. It’s a $1 reusable mug that’s made out of 100 percent polypropylene, the lid and the cup. The cool thing is the convenience factor is solved and the cost factor is solved because it’s only a buck, instead of our standard price between $10 and $18 for our mugs. It looks and feels like our existing paper cup, maintaining the brand attachment and Starbucks experience. For folks who were previously comfortable with our single-serve cups, this gives them an option for a reusable cup. And, because it’s only a buck, if you forget it at home or in your car or office, you can buy another one. After the introduction of the $1 reusable cup, we saw a significant bump in the purchase of reusables overall. But, more importantly, we also saw a marked increase in the number of people bringing their mugs back into the store to be reused.

Number two is encouraging our store managers to learn which customers typically enjoy their beverages in the stores and serve them in ceramic mugs, again, to reduce the use of single-serve packaging. You’d be surprised at how many customers don’t even know that we offer ceramic mugs in our stores. 

Number 3 is, for customers who choose to use single-serve cups, how do we do that in a way that provides that great Starbucks experience they’ve come to expect, delivers their beverage safely and conveniently every time, and has the lowest environmental footprint. 

That’s where we can really look at materials innovations, such as the post-consumer fiber we already use, innovation in coatings on the paper to impact recyclability and industry-wide material standardization to create scale for recyclers. Finally, when I talk about our 2015 goal of declaring our cups recyclable, what I’m talking about is access to recycling. The industry often defines recyclability or compostability based on the materials of our packaging, when we should be defining it based on access that our customers have to recycling or composting services. This isn’t Jim Hanna making up his own definitions. It’s the Federal Trade Commission’s Green Guide that defines recyclability in that way and that’s the definition we use for our target.

For Starbucks, we define recyclability as follows: When our customer chooses to dispose of their cups—whether it’s in our stores, in their homes, in their offices or in a public space, if they don’t have access to recycling at that point, then the cups aren’t recyclable. They’re going to go into a landfill. That’s what we’re focusing on—building those infrastructures for recycling and end of life so that, hopefully, by 2015 we can actually cross the Federal Trade Commission’s 60 percent access threshold and declare victory.

 

Q: How do your packaging designs used in the foodservice environment at the point of consumption differ from some of those used in your retail products and why?


Hanna:
They don’t—and that’s a good thing. We take a holistic approach to packaging design whether it’s for retail stores or in our foodservice operations. 

We also look at our transport packaging, the movement of packaging from our distribution centers into our stores or the packaging that comes directly into the stores. We have significant focus on our supply chain to be able to help them minimize over packaging—which has been a pet peeve of our store partners (employees). Nothing galls them more than to get a small delivery in a big box. We know that cubing efficiency and standardization of packaging sizes is essential for efficient transportation, but we know there’s a significant footprint associated with transportation that can be significantly reduced if done right. 

We’ve been making significant progress in balancing efficient transportation with minimization of packaging, while balancing the need to maintain integrity of the items being transported. This includes introduction of durable, reusable transport packaging across our distribution network. While we’ve made huge progress, other retailers out there live and breathe this stuff, especially the ones that own their entire distribution systems, and have had significantly more leadership in this area that we can learn from.

We want to be game changers in the industry. But we’re also willing to follow game changers in areas where they either have more influence, more exposure to the issue or a greater ability to be those game changers. That’s one exciting culture of our company: We put a stake in the ground where we think we can change the world. We also know that there are many other companies who can do the same thing and we’re glad to follow them.

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Global market for advanced packaging is growing






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Posted by Jack Mans, Plant Operations Editor — Packaging Digest, 5/28/2013 3:46:34 PM





The global market for advanced packaging solutions that includes active, controlled, intelligent packaging, and advanced packaging components was at $31.4 billion in 2011, according to a report from BCC Research entitled Active, Controlled, and Intelligent Packaging for Foods and Beverages — Focus on Active Packaging.

The market growth looks promising and the overall market value for 2017 is projected to be nearly $44.3 billion after increasing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.8%. The market was dominated by controlled packaging, which had sales of nearly $12.4 billion in 2011. The expected CAGR for controlled packaging is 6% from 2012 through 2017, resulting in a projected market value of $17.6 billion in 2017. Active packaging was next in market sharB - Global- rrr.JPGe in 2011 with nearly $8.8 billion in sales; the anticipated CAGR for this segment of advanced packaging is 5.2%, leading to a market value of $11.9 billion in 2017. Advanced packaging components accounted for $6.5 billion of sales in 2011, and the market value for 2017 for this segment is expected to be at around $9.4 billion after rising at a 6.3% CAGR.

The intelligent packaging sales were nearly $3.8 billion in 2011 and could approach $5.3 billion in 2017 with a CAGR 5.6%. 

Consumer packaging is a vital component of contemporary living today, with food and beverage packaging making up the largest segment. Key megatrends, such as upgraded standard of living and demand for safety, convenience, health, well-being, and sustainability are creating long-term shifts affecting consumers’ lives, eating habits, and purchasing behaviors across many different markets, regions and demographics. These shifts, which started a decade or so ago, have forced a constant change of behavior in their manifestation. Globalization has had a tremendous effect as well on the regional markets; however, trends are to some extent also influenced by regional cultures, depending on the progress of the market in question. 

Companies engaged in manufacturing and selling food and beverage packaging must adhere as necessary to whatever regulations are in place or devised. Consumer acceptance is another key factor that manufacturers, retailers, and others involved in the industry should consider. For example, a sudden change in the regular packaging of a product such as meat or poultry might influence consumers’ purchasing of the product. Thus, the company that suddenly introduces a different packaging medium would have to provide detailed and relevant information to foster consumer acceptance of the new packaging. 

The increasing consumer demand for fresh and unaltered food has driven the integration of active packaging in the food and beverages industry. Active packaging uses a variety of techniques. Regional markets for active packaging of food and beverages have grown due to consumer preference for minimally processed foods that employ minimal or no preservatives. The convergence of global factors such as eating habits, health awareness, stress factors due to an overnight work culture, stricter regulations on food safety, and others have added to the transformation of food packaging. These factors have driven the growth of active packaging techniques in all regions.

Controlled packaging of food and beverages in the regional markets grew well during the examined period of 2010 to 2012. There is an expectation of sustained growth for controlled packaging in all regions, since the packaging techniques are focused primarily on retaining the freshness of everyday consumable products such as fresh produce (fruits and vegetables), dairy products, and other preprocessed foods for a particular segment of people.
The intelligent packaging market across all regions – North America, Europe, and emerging markets – increased substantially from 2010 to 2012 and is expected to sustain this growth for the next four to five years. A number of portentous activities, such as collaborative efforts and new product development in the Asia-Pacific region as well as in the European and North American markets, were witnessed.

Global Markets for Active, Controlled and Intelligent Packaging for Foods and Beverages (FOD038C) covers the market for active, controlled, and intelligent packaging, including advanced packaging components. BCC’s analysis includes an evaluation of the market and market breakdowns (including by region and by application) for each advanced packaging type; a breakdown of the market into subcategories as the available data allows; market forecasting; and examination of regulatory aspects, innovations, challenges, patent details, market leaders, and market share of individual packaging types. In addition, the study discusses scientific advances, consumer behaviors, and market vibrancy. 

Market data is presented to show global market trends and growth. Data are statistically validated for present and future predictions. 

Source and publisher: BCC Research LLC, 49 Walnut Park, Building 2, Wellesley, MA 02481, Telephone: 866-285-7215; Email: editor@bccresearch.com.

Active, Controlled, and Intelligent Packaging for Foods and Beverages( FOD038C)

Target Date: May 2013 Price: $5450.00







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Bio-Board project promotes packaging recyclability






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Posted by Jack Mans, Plant Operations Editor — Packaging Digest, 5/23/2013 4:11:34 PM





A EuroA - Bio-Board - rrr.jpgpean project called the Bio-Board project has been

instituted to develop sustainable protein-based paper and paperboard coating systems to increase the recyclability of food and beverage packaging materials. The BIO-BOARD project will build on past research that has revealed that whey protein coating can provide bio-degradable plastic layers that can replace existing plastic coatings in multilayer packaging and enhance their recyclability by separating the individual fractions of the multilayer packaging.

 

To this end, a tailored coating system based on the renewable raw material derived from agro waste and its technological application will be developed for extrusion coating paper, paperboard and cardboard to produce packaging materials. The base material for the coating will be innovative formulations based on proteins such as whey and residues from potato. Currently, half of the 50 million tons of whey produced annually in Europe from cheese production is discarded, while about 65,000 tons of dried fruit juice protein and 140,000 tons of dried potato pulp are produced during starch production annually within the EU that could be available for utilization.

The Bio-Board project coordinator Dr. Elodie Bugnicourt, from Barcelona-based IRIS (http://www.iris.cat), highlights that, “Bio-Board stands in response to the current demand from producers of coated paper, paperboard and cardboard manufacturers for a bioplastic that will enable them to substitute much of the currently used synthetic coating without compromising the barrier properties of the resulting packaging laminates and overcoming the current challenge to the recycling of such packaging. Bio-Board is based a holistic integrated environmental approach to increase the sustainability of materials and processes throughout their life cycle”.

The three-year project, which is composed by 14 partners from 10 European countries, has received funding from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) managed by REA Research Executive Agency under grant agreement n°315313.







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Who is willing to fork out more for fresh and sustainable packaging?






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/8/2013 10:57:55 AM





 

Fresh foods (Microsoft)When it comes to food and beverage packaging, consumers are most likely to pay more for value-added features that relate to freshness and sustainability. This is the latest finding from a global study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

Consumers from around the world were given a list of potential packaging features and asked which ones they would be willing to pay more for. On a global basis, consumers were most likely to say they would pay more for “Packaging that keeps food fresh longer” (55 percent) and “Packaging that is environmentally-friendly” (55 percent).

 

Following freshness and environmental benefits, consumers said they were likely to pay more for packaging that is re-usable (42 percent) and easier to use (39 percent). Interestingly, more sophisticated packaging features were less likely to motivate consumers to spend more: packaging that prevents mess or spills, keeps food and beverages at the right temperature, and makes it easier to eat and drink on-the-go ranked lowest (34 percent, 33 percent and 31 percent, respectively).

 

“Packaging plays a key role in consumer packaged goods innovation, whether marketers are introducing new products or trying to invigorate existing brands” ,” says Lauren Demar, global CEO, Ipsos InnoQuest. “As a key driver in the consumer’s decision to buy, packaging features can often be leveraged to charge a premium. Our latest findings indicate that consumers place the most value on packaging that preserves freshness and offers environmental benefits. For marketers, there may be an opportunity to win over consumers and increase revenues through innovative package designs that deliver sustainability of freshness as well as sustainability of the planet.”

 

The survey also revealed that certain countries were more likely to say they would pay more for fresh and sustainable packaging:

 

South Africa, Malaysia and India were most likely to say they would pay more for packaging that keeps food fresh longer.

Mexico, South Africa and Indonesia were most likely to say they would pay more for environmentally-friendly packing.

 

Complimentary access to the data in this report for each of the 26 countries is available upon request from Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

These are the findings from a study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest via Ipsos Global @dvisor, an online survey of citizens around the world. A total of 19,883 adults from 26 countries were polled between Aug. 7 and 21, 2012. The countries included Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.

 

Source: Ipsos InnoQuest

 

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Package lightweighting: How far is too far?






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/14/2013 10:16:21 AM





VIDEO: In this exclusive interview conducted by Packaging Digest Executive Editor Lisa Pierce, PepsiCo senior director of beverage packaging R&D explains the delicate balance between optimizing a package for sustainability and maintaining a quality usage experience for the consumer.

 

To view this video at YouTube, click here.







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Pet Beverage Bottles Are One Of The Trends For Future Development

Pet Beverage Bottles Are One Of The Trends For Future Development

PET beverage packaging as the packaging aspect of food production enterprises, more than 30 years people have been exploring ways to replace Glass bottle And tin cans in the packaging materials and containers, and plastic is the best material currently available. It has the characteristics of light weight, can reduce transportation costs. But not every plastic are suitable for Food Packaging . Polyester (PET) food packaging material appears to be a rapid development. The first use of PET bottles soft drinks business in the United States Coca-Cola Company, they used to replace 1.5-liter PET bottles 1 liter glass bottles, resulting in increased sales by 27%. PET containers after the food and beverage packaging gradually become a popular “hot demand.” PET containers light weight and strong firm attracted customers by the market. There is also a big advantage of PET material that can form any shape (the applicability of good), but also can be processed into line with people’s habit of color, text and images can be Print .

PET beverage bottles are one of the trends for future development

Domestic PET bottle of mainstream products, initially limited to colas, mineral water, distilled water used in drinks like packaging container, the application of its excellent performance and reasonable price widely welcomed by users in these drinks packaging Based on the successful application of recent years has been in the heat-resistant PET bottle bottled drinks black tea, green tea, Juice And edible oil, cosmetics, medicine, pesticide and other industries to expand its applications. It is reported that in 1996 China’s production of PET bottle 3 billion in 1998 rose to 5 billion in 2000 to reach 8 billion, 9 billion in 2001, 2002, to reach 10 billion, 13 billion in 2004 to become Plastic packaging materials Largest increase variety. Particularly since 2001 with the sudden emergence of the domestic market of tea drink (tea production in 2001 reached 3,000,000 t), tea beverages 85 ~ 90 hot filling PET bottle PET bottle has become the fastest growing in recent years species. At the same time, PET aseptic cold filling bottle the trend of the rise in Japan and other countries, cause for concern. Aseptic cold filling PET bottle technology will reduce the number of applications the importance of hot-fill PET bottles, PET bottles to increase non-heat-resistant PET bottle production in the whole of GDP. Mentioned earlier non- Carbonated beverages Fruit juice, vegetable juice, various flavors of tea drinks, dairy products, coffee, etc., the traditional hot filling perfusion techniques are used, but this technology PET bottles require a higher (must use high-temperature hot-fill PET bottles ), it was reported that Japan already has one-third of non-carbonated beverages using aseptic cold filling technology, therefore, that the future development of PET beverage bottles are one of the trends. A report said the new nutrient-based drinks and flavors added products can help revitalize the stagnant special drink bottled water market, and PET resin and PET bottle suppliers to bring new opportunities.

Recession in the global economy environment, the 2009 pairs of plastic food and beverage packaging industry in China will no doubt be a cold winter, but the ability of PET bottle industry is expected to warm more than other plastic packaging industry stronger. This is mainly the Chinese beverage market in recent years, especially fruit juice and tea drinks market growing rapidly. As the most mainstream of the current beverage packaging materials will also benefit from this PET bottle, so, PET bottles will have greater market opportunities.

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I am an expert from Mp3 Player Manufacturers, usually analyzes all kind of industries situation, such as display mannequins , cheap mannequins.

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Reducing Waste In The Food Packaging Industry

Reducing Waste In The Food Packaging Industry

As people all around Australia – and the world – work to reduce the amount of waste that they produce, it is interesting to learn that the food packaging industry is playing its own part in such efforts. Indeed, with Australia among the top waste producing countries in the world, it is quite telling that the packaging industry works so hard in such efforts.

Waste In Australia –

In order to get a handle on the contributions that are made by the food packaging industry when it comes to waste in Australia, it helps to have a basic understanding of the numbers. Approximately 2.2 million tonnes of food waste is produced in this country each year. Were it not for food packaging suppliers, it would be considerably more. Each family in Australia generates about 400 kilograms of waste per year. These numbers definitely put Australia’s role in waste production into perspective.

Why Reducing Waste Is Important –

Most people realise that reducing waste is an important way to help save the planet. Australia’s greenhouse emissions could be reduced by up to three percent through the reduction of the organic waste found in food. Additionally, reducing the waste could help reduce the size of landfills around the country. Unquestionably, waste reduction is extremely important – and the Australian food and beverage packaging industries are doing as much as they can to help.

What Is Saved Through Recycling?

Recycling is a core part of the food packaging industry’s philosophy. Considering all of the good that is accomplished by every household that recycles, it’s plain to see why this industry places such an emphasis on it. For every household that actively recycles, enough energy is saved to run a 40-watt light globe for about 72 hours. Over 90 litres of water are saved per week through such efforts, and about 3.6 kilograms of solid waste are saved per week as well. Every little bit definitely helps, which is why food packaging suppliers make sure to do their own part.

How Packaging’s Been Reduced –

As more and more emphasis is placed on waste reduction, the Australian food and beverage packaging industry have adapted numerous changes in order to help. For instance, the soft drink industry – which once required about 453 grams of packaging to distribute and manufacturing a single litre of soft drink – has cut back considerably. Today, that industry only requires about 150 grams per litre of soft drink; that marks a 67% reduction, which isn’t an inconsiderable sum. The waste reduction in Australia should accelerate significantly as more changes take place within the industry.

The food packaging industry has played a very important role in helping Australia become greener and more eco-friendly. Along with all of the help of individual households, packaging suppliers such as Dabron Packaging have amped up their efforts to produce less waste. Going forward, the industry will undoubtedly continue to improve its efforts.

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