Pack & Gift 2013: Promotions at the heart of brand strategy

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Salton INTENSE

Project: Salton INTENSE

Development of specific range for the external market of Salton winery.

Vinícola Salton is one of the three largest Brazilian wineries, with a turnover exceeding USD 400 million annually. However,  its strength  lies in the domestic market, where it leads in the sparkling segment and it has very good participation with increasingly stronger brands in premium wines.  Its  following challenge was to develop a strong brand that can be positioned in external markets, focusing on U.S. and Europe. We developed a brand strategy and product image that would help show the values ​​of Brazil (mainly joy, color, passion) but without losing the elegance and value that a product of this segment needs to transmit.

The Carnival is the main cultural event that takes place annually and is one of the country’s cultural icons. We took the essence of carnival, represented by plumed helmet that  the principal dancer of each samba school wears and that was the icon chosen as image tags. The result has been very balanced,  conveying  both the Brazilian joy and the elegance and value of a product in this segment. The product has had rave reviews from press and importers both from USA and Europe. Now  growing exports are expected.

 ABOUT THE PROJECT
We developed a small calligraphic lettering system for sub brands and descriptors. We also developed the art of  the helmet  with colors and techniques such as stamping, silk-screen printing, etc. Selected papers are ultra resistant to moisture, a conditioning feature of the climate in that country.

Credits:

Creative Director: MARIANO GIOIA

Art Director:  SEBASTIAN YÁÑEZ

CP:

• LAURA RIOS

• MARIANA ZUÑIGA

• MARTA VARGAS

Designers:

• MARIANA ZUÑIGA

• LAURA RIOS

• MARTA VARGAS

• INSA MATIAS

Calligraphy:  NAHUEL Arrúe

Contributors:  JEREMIAH MARIN

Project : SALTON INTENSO ME (Foreign Market)

Web: www.yg-d.com

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Pearlfisher London Creates New Brand Strong – A New Range of High Quality Nutrients

Pearlfisher London creates new brand Strong – a new range of high quality nutrients. Pearlfisher has created the brand strategy, naming, identity, packaging, retail and digital communications for Strong, a range of high quality complex nutrients. Strong is made from the freshest and highest grade of ingredients, developed to target health and beauty at a cellular level, for a stronger, more vibrant and younger body.

Pearlfisher’s objective was to create a brand that could stand out in the crowded and functional supplement market, celebrate the idea of ‘beauty from within’ and bring to life the end benefits in a unique and emotional way.

Karen Welman, founding partner and chief creative officer at Pearlfisher commented, “The idea was to create an impactful visual story using the metaphor of beautiful and elegant birds that have hidden strength. The brand name – Strong – and the playful variant names and descriptors are simple yet impactful and clearly communicate the brand’s promise of inner strength and outer beauty.”

Pearlfisher created custom hand-drawn typography for the brand name and commissioned a series of bespoke bird illustrations that bring to life the product benefits in an unexpected and emotive way. For example, for ‘brain box’ an owl was used to represent how the powerful combination of cutting edge nutrients promotes optimal brain performance, whilst a bright yellow canary was used for the ‘sunshine pill’ to illustrate the end benefit of a radiant, healthier immune system and stronger bones. The end result is visually arresting creating strong visibility both in retail and online environments.

Pearlfisher also developed the communications material and the brand website for Strong which is currently under development and will be launched soon. Zana Morris, founder of The Library, a new private members training club in London’s Notting Hill, commented, “It has always been a life long dream of mine to create a high quality nutrient brand that would offer consumers something new in a world of renowned low quality, low ingredient supplements. Pearlfisher have taken that ambition and translated it into a beautiful and groundbreaking visual expression that will revolutionise the category.”

Strong is currently sold exclusively through The Library, and soon through high-end high street and online retailers.

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Anthem Worldwide’s Kathy Oneto to Speak at the 9th Annual M2W: Marketing To Women Conference

Anthem Worldwide, part of the brand development practice of Schawk, Inc. (NYSE: SGK), whose integrated global network provides innovative solutions to articulate, unify and manage brand impact to create compelling and consistent brand experiences, announced that Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy has been invited to speak for the second year in a row at the 9th Annual M2W: Marketing To Women Conference, April 15 – 17, 2013, Chicago Cultural Center.

“Regardless of age, 74% of women are motivated to be healthy,” said Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy, of Anthem’s San Francisco office. “Anthem’s recent study looks at women’s motivations, while contrasting them against the expectations they may feel. The attitude of today’s woman about health and wellness is that they would rather live according to their internal motivations and not to external expectations.”

Anthem Worldwide’s newest Health and Wellness study of three generations of women examines what women really want from health and wellness and what makes them motivated to achieve it, getting beyond what she feels she should do to understanding what she wants to do about health and wellness.

Added Oneto: “Anthem’s study found that women are open to—and are in fact seeking—brands to motivate them to be healthy and well so they can reach their goals at any life stage. The brands that speak to this desire authentically have an opportunity to build lasting connections with generations of women.”

Ms. Oneto will address how brand marketers can speak more powerfully to women about health and wellness in a way that is consistent with their goals and self identity and their desire to follow their own motivations, whether they are Millennials, Generation X or Baby Boomers.

From motivations to purchase behaviors, Oneto will share the findings across these three generations and the surprising insights of what women really want in being healthy in her M2W presentation “What Women Really Want From Health and Wellness.”

Jim Lucas, executive vice president, global director, insights and strategy, at Schawk, Inc. will accompany Oneto and speak to the topic of “How She Buys: The Contours of Constraint.” Their decades of experience in marketing, branding, strategy and insights combine to offer an eye-opening look into the minds of women when it comes to health and wellness.

Kathy Oneto is also the author of the white paper “What Women Really Want: From Health And Wellness” from which her talk will be inspired.

For a more in-depth look at the data, click the following Web site address to read more and access, “What Women Really Want: From Health And Wellness.” http://www.schawk.com/knowledge-center/documents/white-paper/what-women-really-want-from-health-wellness

For more information on Kathy Oneto’s M2W “What Women Really Want: From Health and Wellness” session description, click the following Web address: http://www.m2w.biz/speakers.php#want

For more insights by Anthem’s thought-leaders Kathy Oneto and Jim Lucas and highlights that can be shared with the “What Women Really Want: From Health and Wellness” Infographic, click the following Web site addresses: http://m2w.anthemww.com and http://www.anthemww.com/marketing2women/infographic#.UWHg246Vtjw

For complete M2W – The Marketing To Women Conference information, the nation’s premier conference on marketing to women to be held April 15 – 17, 2013 at The Chicago Cultural Center, click the following Web site address: http://www.m2w.biz/

Anthem Worldwide is part of the brand development division of Schawk, Inc. (NYSE: SGK). Anthem’s integrated global network provides innovative solutions to articulate, unify and manage brand impact to create compelling and consistent brand experiences. We do this by aligning our strategic, creative and executional talent worldwide with the business needs of companies seeking a competitive advantage. Anthem offers a full range of branding and design services through our network of world-class design professionals in 10 cities, including Chicago, Cincinnati, Hilversum (The Netherlands), London, New York, San Francisco, Singapore, Sydney, Toronto, and York (U.K.).

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Ideation Vivace

One of journalism’s greatest wordsmiths, Arthur Brisbane, is famed for giving the advice, “Use a picture. It’s worth a thousand words.” Peter Clarke, CEO and founder of a brand strategy and design consultancy Product Ventures, says that if a picture is worth 1,000 words, “a prototype speaks 10,000 pictures” when designing packages. 

Part of the prototypes’ power for ideation, adds Tom Newmaster, partner at packaging, advertising and multimedia design firm William Fox Munroe, comes from the insight a designer gets “from the simple ability to correctly convey how well a design performs and an understanding of how package graphics will look when scaled up to actual physical size.”

Resetting the clock on conceptualization
Using prototypes to prove design concepts carries a fraction of the costs of actual package production—both in time and dollars—and it can be the best way to convince a client to make or avoid a packaging change.

Brian Everett, packaging designer at IQ PKG, the design arm of the packaging supplier formerly known as Spartech and now part of the PolyOne Corporation, says prototyping helped the agency demonstrate a better alternative to the large stock tubs that a customer was using for a hand-packed food product. IQ PKG was able to show how a redesigned package would deliver better stacking strength, greater ease of use for the packaging line workers and a “more fun” appearance that made the finished package more competitive in its big-box retailing environment by giving the client a physical prototype that they can hold.

Jack Hinkel, executive director, implementation at brand consultancy Interbrand, says these benefits also extend to virtual prototyping. “When a client is trying to decide if a spot varnish is worth the extra cost, I can use Interbrand 3-D [the company’s own branded virtual prototyping platform] to show in real time what that product looks like with the spot varnish on and with the spot varnish off of the product.”

This, he says, is increasingly important as special effects such as metallic finishes are becoming more popular with brands. “If you have a product that has foil on it,” says Hinkel. “Depending on where it is on the package and in the store, the foil will capture light differently. In a shadow, the foiled area will darken. By viewing the varnished and foiled packages in a virtual store space, we, along with our client, can really evaluate a concept. And I can show them all this in real time.”

Flexibility from in-house capabilities
Interbrand 3-D is powered by Esko’s Studio and Visualizer software. Studio provides designers with a 3-D working environment, and Visualizer is the virtual prototyping engine.

Once Interbrand designers build the art files, the computer creates all of the special effects. But the agency says the most profound effects of this workflow is in the revision stage, where a traditional workflow requires having a prototyping service rebuild the entire physical piece adding days and dollars to a design project’s costs. Interbrand 3-D enables Hinkel to turn the effect “plate” off to render the image without the effect quickly.

“I was able to deliver a project on cost that we were changing in real time,” he explains. “We played with the texture pattern behind the emboss, and silver ink and spot varnish options. I switched back and forth between those three options right in front of the client so they could get a feel for each option right away.”

Scott Lucas, executive director at Interbrand, adds, that Interbrand 3-D enables a client to interact with the design concepts in a very tactile way. “I have Interbrand 3-D installed on my iPad,” he remarks. “It’s amazing to be able to call up the prototype, slide my iPad across the table and let the client interact with it first hand. That’s some kind of moment where the concept comes off of a screen and into their hands.”

Clarke agrees that full control of the prototyping process is important but believes that agencies can retain that control while producing physical prototypes. This is why the agency has invested in everything from label and film printing systems to stereolithographic and 3-D printing systems. 

Working with low-budget projects
Although his agency has been an equipment beta test site for years, pushing the limits of next-generation proofers and production systems, Tom Newmaster concedes that what’s “affordable” hinges on how the client values prototyping as part of the package development process.

The customer who exclaims, “$400 for that little box?” Newmaster opines, may not be fully aware of the cost benefits of validating packaging concepts with physical samples.

But no matter the budget, Newmaster remarks, “let’s comp before we release the file” is always good advice. 

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Desire for details

In a consumer insights study, Anthem Worldwide, the branding agency aim of Schawk, predicted Consumer Engaged, Shopper Informedto be a ruling trend in 2013. (For more in-depth data, click to read more and access “Anthem Sightings, Vol.4, 2012: The Forecast Issue.” )

“The results of the study support the conclusion that despite the pervading belief of marketers that consumers and shoppers want to simplify as much as possible, 58 percent of total respondents believe “Getting into the details” will be a more prominent trend in 2013 compared to the counter trend “Skimming the highlights,” says Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy, of Anthem’s San Francisco office. (See more of Oneto’s insights in the video “Inflection Point: Where Will 2013 Take Us?”)

She adds, “One could argue that today’s consumers are more engaged with brands than ever before. Some even create ads for brands, while others create movements that change company actions. At the same time, shoppers are now armed with and connected to more information, reviews, and recommendations than in the past, making them savvy, engaged purchasers.”

The study found that while U.S. consumers were balanced in their responses, 61% of U.K. consumers and 59% of Chinese consumers were more strongly aligned with the sentiment that “Getting into the details” would be more prominent compared to “Skimming the highlights.” Despite people being busy, it appears they are willing to dig in and take advantage of the data now available to them.

Oneto warns that designers should move forward in moderation, though. “And yet, there’s merit to the Art of Skimming counter trend,” she notes. “While some people engage deeply with brands and have more informed purchasing habits, Twitter has fueled brevity of communication. Our full, on-demand, connected lives amplify Twitter’s impact, making us consume information in bite-sized pieces, catching only the headlines and wanting to know more with less.”

Oneto remarked: “When consumers are given too much information, they are more likely to over think their decisions and feel less confident about the choices they make. The most important question marketers need to ask themselves is this: How can you tell your story in as simple and consumable a way possible, leveraging visual design cues and copy to drive purchases and build affinity?”

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“Older and Wiser” Trumps “Youthfulness” as Trend in 2013

Anthem Worldwide, the brand development practice of Schawk, Inc. (NYSE: SGK), whose integrated global network provides innovative solutions to articulate, unify and manage brand impact to create compelling and consistent brand experiences, announced that its most recent consumer insights study has revealed that Older and Wiser trumps Youthfulness as a trend in 2013.

Anthem Worldwide identified 10 consumer and shopper trends and counter-trends and fielded a study to get a pulse on these sentiments in the U.S., U.K. and China. One of these, Youthfulness vs. Older and Wiser, related to who consumers are. Consumers were asked which they believed would be more prominent in 2013: “a youthful spirit” or “an older, wiser soul.” The study conducted by Ipsos from December 17 to 25, 2012, included an international sample of 1,500 people (500 from the U.S., U.K., and China, respectively) from Ipsos’ online panel.

The results of the study support the conclusion that in aggregate, across all three countries, more than half of respondents, 59%, believe that Older and Wiser will be a more prominent trend than Youthfulness in 2013.

While U.S. consumers were split more evenly between Older and Wiser and Youthfulness (49% vs. 51%, respectively), consumers in the U.K. and China weighted the results more towards Older and Wiser. Sixty-two percent of U.K. consumers and 66% of Chinese consumers believed that “an older, wiser soul” would be a more prominent sentiment.

Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy, of Anthem Worldwide, noted, “In China, this is likely due to the deep-rooted family tradition of having respect for one’s elders, along with the forecasted fast rate of growth of its elderly population given the country’s one-child policy and improved life expectancy. In the U.K., the high unemployment rate of youth, at about 20%, and older people staying and having more presence in the workforce longer may be influencing this sentiment.

“Boomers around the globe still have great influence,” added Oneto. “Older age isn’t what it once was, especially for women who find their next act and really come into their own in this stage of life. Vibrancy and energy are still critical and possible with people in this age group not weighed down by expectations and judgment. The lightheartedness that supposedly is present in youth is actually practiced at an older age, with boomers having more presence to shrug off the unimportant.”

Oneto concluded, “While not considered to be as prominent, youthfulness will still be in force to some degree, as the youth movement has been impacting elections, creating movements, and stopping businesses over the last couple of years. And while youth around the globe are more challenged and stressed than in generations past, they are also more entrepreneurial and motivated to make a difference in the world. The youthful spirit shouldn’t be underestimated; in truth, we all want a piece of it.”

For more in-depth data, click the following Web site address to read more and access, “Anthem Sightings, Vol.4, 2012: The Forecast Issue.” http://www.schawk.com/knowledge-center/white-papers

Also, click to watch Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy at Anthem Worldwide in a recent BrandSquare Live Webinar, “Inflection Point: Where Will 2013 Take Us?”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JNWry9cnfM

Anthem Worldwide is part of the brand development practice of Schawk, Inc. (NYSE: SGK). Anthem’s integrated global network provides innovative solutions to articulate, unify and manage brand impact to create compelling and consistent brand experiences. We do this by aligning our strategic, creative and executional talent worldwide with the business needs of companies seeking a competitive advantage. Anthem offers a full range of branding and design services through our network of world-class design professionals in 10 cities, including Chicago, Cincinnati, Hilversum (The Netherlands), London, New York, San Francisco, Singapore, Sydney, Toronto, and York (U.K.)

Methodology
These are some of the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted December 17-25, 2012.  For the survey, national samples of 500 adults per country were interviewed online in the U.S., U.K. and China; totaling a final sample of 1,500 adults across countries.  Weighting was employed to balance demographics and ensure that the sample’s composition reflects that of the universe at the country level. The precision of online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of plus or minus 3 percentage points for data reported across all three countries, and 5 percentage points for data on individual countries.  All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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"Creating it myself," a driving trend in 2013






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Posted by Jack Mans — Packaging Digest, 2/13/2013 10:47:17 AM





Anthem Worldwide, part of the brand development practice of SchAnthem.jpgawk, whose integrated global network provides innovative solutions to articulate, unify and manage brand impact to create compelling and consistent brand experiences, announced that its most recent consumer insights study reveals Creating It Myself as a driving trend in 2013.

Anthem Worldwide identified 10 Consumer and Shopper Trends and Counter-Trends and fielded a study to get a pulse on these sentiments in the U.S., U.K. and China. One of these, Creating it Myself vs. Buying Ready Made, related to what consumers want. Consumers were asked which they believed would be more prominent in 2013: “Buying Ready Made” or “Creating it Myself.”

 

The study conducted by Ipsos from December 17-25, 2012, included an international sample of 1,500 people (500 from the U.S., U.K., and China, respectively) from Ipsos’ online panel.

Across all three countries, in aggregate, more than half of respondents (56 percent) believe that Creating it Myself will be a more prominent trend in 2013. However, U.S., respondents weighted the results towards “Buying ready made,” with 59 percent believing this would be more prominent. Anthem laddered this to a broader theme of “Do More for Me.”

“Let’s face it, most of us in the U.S. operate at maximum capacity, and adding one more thing to the ‘to do’ list can tip the scale,” said Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy, of Anthem’s San Francisco office. “So it’s not surprising to find that U.S. consumers appreciate products and services that do more for them, taking tasks, steps, or organizational needs off their plates and providing helpful, simplifying solutions.”

 

On the flip side, 66 percent of U.K. respondents and 61 percent of China respondents believed Creating it Myself would be more prominent.

 

Oneto noted: “In the U.K., two trends give credence to the Create Myself trend-the rise of cooking-by-scratch (called “Scratch Cookery”), driven by economic conditions, and the increase in self-created content, such as music, videos, and imagery, driven by new technologies that make self-creation easier. In China this is likely influenced by the rise of the entrepreneurial spirit, with increasing opportunities to start one’s own business.”

 

Oneto concluded: “The Create Myself trend is influenced by the building movement towards what some are calling the ‘maker economy.’ With lowered barriers to production and distribution, new tools for making goods on one’s own, and new platforms upon which businesses can be built, creators are becoming business builders, not just hobbyists. Chris Anderson, the editor-in-chief of WIRED magazine, and author of Makers: The New Industrial Revolution is championing the movement towards manufacturing democratization. It’s essentially the next generation of DIY. Some may make things solely for their own use, while others will build businesses that in decades past were never possible.”

 

For more in-depth data, click to read more and access “Anthem Sightings, Vol.4, 2012: The Forecast Issue.” http://www.schawk.com/knowledge-center/white-papers

 

Click to watch Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy at Anthem Worldwide in this recent BrandSquare Live Webinar “Inflection Point: Where Will 2013 Take Us?” 

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The “Sachet Economy” in the Philippines and Its Hidden Costs

The “Sachet Economy” in the Philippines and Its Hidden Costs

Any resident of the Philippines can tell that a slice of Pinoy life guarantees an encounter with the ubiquitous sachet. There is just no avoiding it, and by all indications, the omnipresence of sachets doesn’t seem to raise eyebrows – not even the consumers.’
The following is an excerpt from the March 4, 2005 article from Brand Strategy, entitled BRAND PAPERS: A sachet economy.(in Philippines goods are sold in small quantities):

“Manufacturers in the US may be driven by the ‘super-sized’, bulk- obsessed consumer but in the Philippines, orders come bit by bit,” says Tina Arceo-Dumlao.

In the Philippines, big profits come in small packages – from cigarettes sold by the stick to little plastic packs of pepper. A recent Synovate Global Omnibus study revealed that nearly 90% of Filipinos buy items in sachet sizes, including non-food goods such as shampoo (90%), toothpaste (47%) and detergent powder (13%). This archipelago has become one of the world’s biggest markets for goods sold in small quantities, earning itself the nickname, the ‘sachet economy’.

But does it all add up? Surely logic dictates that buying individual aspirin is more expensive in the long run than buying a thousand in one go? Not so. The Soap and Detergent Association of the Philippines claims that the introduction of sachets, made possible by the use of composite materials, has made the quality products offering hygiene benefits, such as toothpaste and shampoo, accessible to the poorest part of the population.

Indeed, a sachet economy does make available a variety of necessities, perhaps even a few luxuries, albeit in small quantities, to Filipinos of the least spending power. Personal hygiene products, packaged food, and any other product that could be divided into usable portions, could be sold in small uniform packs that are conveniently suited for modest budgets.

From a potential first-time user’s standpoint, small quantities in sachets offer a chance for product trial without committing too much of a typical limited budget. The risk of picking a sub par product isn’t lessened by the existence of trial sizes, but that feeling of regret after spending some amount of money on what turns out to be a bad product is far less than it would have been had the purchase price been much higher because of the larger variant’s size.

Sometimes one might simply prefer to buy a large variety, or perhaps buy only a single sachet. Whether for an emergency or for travel, these very portable sachets (as opposed to inconvenient packs to lug around like an entire jar of coffee) may be availed of without queuing at the long lines of a supermarket since there are convenience stores and mom-and-pop stores dispensing products in small packs, single serves, and most certainly, sachets.

These are the obvious advantages of a sachet economy for consumers. It is a point of view that is so detached, and practically oblivious to the costs of having a sachet economy – costs that aren’t so obvious and hardly ever thought of or discussed.

The case for selling progressively smaller quantities of product in the Philippines is underpinned by the desire of consumers within the lowest income brackets for the same products available to the well off. Consumers belonging in socioeconomic class DE may be able to afford the same products that the middle class C enjoys, but in more limited quantities. The idea that is perpetuated almost sounds like a marketing textbook; marketing involves making available to customers their needs and wants, and peddling sachets is no different. From a manager’s or business owner’s perspective, that is perfectly fine. The problems become apparent when such perspective is set aside to consider the costs of a sachet-heavy economy.

First, in a sachet economy, the same quantity of product costs a poor individual more money than it does a wealthy individual, simply because buying piecemeal costs more than buying in bulk. It was already understood in the excerpt above saying “Surely logic dictates that buying individual aspirin is more expensive in the long run than buying a thousand in one go?” The optimistic, and (frankly) biased response that followed was “Not so,” but the next statement “The Soap and Detergent Association of the Philippines claims that the introduction of sachets… has made the quality products offering hygiene benefits… accessible to the poorest part of the population” fails to refute the assertion that buying in bulk is cheaper. Quite the non-sequitur that.

Second, since buying smaller quantities costs more per transaction than buying larger quantities, the sachet purchases tend to feed the profit motive of the manufacturer at the expense of the value added and total utility that the consumer should have enjoyed. In fact, the consumer is made to shoulder the cost of packaging, so more of the money the consumer spends goes into recouping the manufacturer’s packaging cost, not just the product contained. This might seem nearly unnecessary to mention, but dividing a vat of product into smaller packages creates the requirement that each separate package be given its own container, which costs money.

Third, retail display space costs a lot of money in Philippine supermarkets. Manufacturers and distributors spend money not only on strategically visible display locations inside stores on a rental basis, but also the most basic need of a product – to actually be carried by the store, also known as being listed. Getting listed requires a fee, if not some obligatory “support” from the manufacturer like participation in chain-wide promotions or seasonal push activities that drive up the stores’ consumer sales volume. All these cost more money, and these are factored into the price of the products that practically need to pay rent. The sachets may be the small ones, but in today’s competitive market, the displays of each brand’s sachet is made wider, more eye-catching, and display-dominant, for a fee. It takes money to get into the store, it takes more money to stay in the store, and the costs become included in the pricing of products including the sachets. The consumer unwittingly shoulders these costs. So if one wants to make the most of her money knowing that these additional costs went into the prices of her preferred products, she might as well pick the larger ones, if she could afford them.

Fourth, a sachet economy is in a self-perpetuating cycle that is most profitable where most of the population remains poor. The low income customer base stays large, especially since the poor tend to restrict reproduction a lot less than the affluent, so the base actually widens over time, creating even greater demand for sachets of everything. With a system that could be exploited this way, companies such as Unilever whose multi-billion peso sachet business represents more than two thirds of its gross annual revenue in the Philippines, almost look like they would prefer the system to stay that way.

Lastly, with so much demand for packaging material, a country stricken by a sachet economy would generate far more waste material for a given quantity of product than prosperous countries would. The consumption and waste-generating activity here has tremendous environmental impact, and costs Filipinos (1) their health when enduring pollution hazards, (2) their life savings in trying to regain their health, (3) even their homes in the aftermath of storms like Ondoy that combine excessive rainwater with local garbage to produce floods that take too long to drain.

With this broader perspective on what the implications are for a country stuck with a sachet economy, the costs that counterweigh the advantages should make it clear that this whole arrangement only benefits (1) the corporate entities that profit from the growing business of sachets and (2) the government’s tax coffers as direct result of the sachet businesses’ income, but sadly at the expense of the Filipino people, most especially the poor.

PasigRiverAvenger is an online activist whose main crusade at present is to get the Philippine government to pursue real solutions that would revive the Pasig River.

You may read more about his advocacy and let him know what you think on his blog Pasig River Avenger.

 

Article from articlesbase.com

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