Practical ways to reduce your carbon print

Practical ways to reduce your carbon print

Small changes can have a big impact. Climate change is happening all around us and we need to start thinking about ways of reducing our carbon footprint and ‘going green’.

In your home Although planes, offices and factories produce the vast majority of the country’s CO2, as individuals we contribute 40% to the UKs total greenhouse gas emissions and two thirds of this comes from our boilers.

However, you can reduce your CO2 emissions from heating by switching to an energy-efficient boiler. These high-efficiency condensing boilers use the heat that normally escapes through the flue to turn more water vapour back into water. This means as much heat as possible is transferred from the boiler’s burner and as little as possible is lost through the exhaust flue.

Add a complete set of heating controls like timers and radiator thermostats we can reduce the amount of CO2 we produce as a country by 1.4million tones and save over £275 a year.

British Gas is helping you on your way to becoming ‘green’ by offering £825 worth of discounts on replacing your old boiler for a new energy efficient one to. If you buy and new or replacement boiler by 25 July you’ll get £400 off the boiler, free home care for a year and free radiator and controls installation.

It is also important to get the proper insulation as half of all heat loss is through the roof and walls. This will save you around £365 on your heating bills because you won’t need so much heat and you’ll also get a tax rebate of £125.

Out and about Transport is the biggest offender to global warming. We can make a big impact if we reduce our car usage. Walk or cycle on short journeys, and when in cities make use of the much better public transport facilities.

Plus it’s not just how often we drive it is the manner in which we drive. By less hard use of the accelerator and the brake you could make your fuel go a lot further, reducing your emissions and saving you around £200 a year.

At the shops Always buy energy efficient light bulbs. They last on average 12 years longer than standard bulbs and you could save around £100 over their lifetime.

Buy recycled products and remember to reuse your shopping bags. Make sure food packaging also comes from a sustainable forest and is recyclable or has already been recycled.

British Gas is not just a gas supplier. They can also provide you with a greener electricity supply and even help you to upgrade to a more eco friendly heating system.

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Organic Shampoo – natural-hair

Organic Shampoo – natural-hair

Turns out, even with all the reduced packaging, organic haircare product ingredients and sustainable sourcing, a big ol’ whopping 93% of the carbon footprint of hair wash products comes from us, the hair washers. How’s that happen?

Well, according to a research project by Boots, the carbon is used by heating the water, using water, and hair straighteners. So what’s a body to do?

1. Take cooler showers. Of course, we understand if a cold shower isn’t your cup o’ tea. But know that if your skin turns red when you shower, you’re showering too hot and could be hurting your delicate dermis. Consider cranking the temperature down a notch or two. You won’t notice too much of a difference, but your skin will, and your carbon footprint could, too.

2. Take shorter showers. I speak from experience when I say that, if you put your mind to it (and your Green Bean needs to get to school and you need to start work and it’s already, like, a-thousand o’clock), you can indeed shower in five minutes or less. I have done it. More than once. So even if you’re not up for lowering the temperature, try lessening the time. (Plus, if you follow #1 and make the water cooler, you’ll spend less time in there, right?)

3. Turn your hair straightener on later. A lot of us who use hair irons (me included) are used to flipping it on and letting it heat up while we finish drying our hair and putting on makeup. Yet if you check your hair iron, you’ll find it heats up pretty fast. Rather than leaving it on, try heating it only when you’re ready to run it through your hair. When you’re done, turn it off. ‘Nuff said!

Of course one other way to reduce your carbon footprint is to use organic shampoo. Less chemicals means less carbon footprint, and we can all feel good about that.



Well, according to a research project by Boots, the carbon is used by heating the water, using water, and hair straighteners. So what’s a body to do?

1. Take cooler showers. Of course, we understand if a cold shower isn’t your cup o’ tea. But know that if your skin turns red when you shower, you’re showering too hot and could be hurting your delicate dermis. Consider cranking the temperature down a notch or two. You won’t notice too much of a difference, but your skin will, and your carbon footprint could, too.

2. Take shorter showers. I speak from experience when I say that, if you put your mind to it (and your Green Bean needs to get to school and you need to start work and it’s already, like, a-thousand o’clock), you can indeed shower in five minutes or less. I have done it. More than once. So even if you’re not up for lowering the temperature, try lessening the time. (Plus, if you follow #1 and make the water cooler, you’ll spend less time in there, right?)

3. Turn your hair straightener on later. A lot of us who use hair irons (me included) are used to flipping it on and letting it heat up while we finish drying our hair and putting on makeup. Yet if you check your hair iron, you’ll find it heats up pretty fast. Rather than leaving it on, try heating it only when you’re ready to run it through your hair. When you’re done, turn it off. ‘Nuff said!

Of course one other way to reduce your carbon footprint is to use organic shampoo. Less chemicals means less carbon footprint, and we can all feel good about that.

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Reduce Your Company?s Carbon Footprint and Save Money

Reduce Your Company?s Carbon Footprint and Save Money

The environmental cost of commerce has become an important part of business in America and the world as we all become increasingly aware and concerned about the impact of our actions on climate change and our environment.  Many businesses are creating sustainability plans, training environmental impact officers and implementing company wide recycling and reduction programs.

For many small and medium sized businesses, the option of hiring a college degreed sustainability officer and staff is really not in the budget. There are however new online training programs which cater to small and medium sized businesses such as CarbonProfessionalSchool.com But short of taking a course and becoming an expert, what can your business do to be environmentally responsible and reduce your carbon footprint…all while saving money.

Here are 5 ways to reduce your carbon footprint and save some money.

(1) Recycle Toner and Ink Jet Cartridges. These things, which always run out at the most inopportune time, cost way too much and, contrary to what the big companies than manufacture them proclaim with their “send it in recycling programs” – end up in the landfill, usually in the poorest areas of the world.  The technology and quality of recycled toner and ink jet cartridges in many cases surpasses the original equipment manufacturers…and you get to support a local business like yours when you patronize them.   And don’t forget to set your printers to “draft” mode when you’re not printing for official communications…it’ll save you money and toner/ink.

(2) Use Less and Buy Recycled Paper. Back in the early 90’s when email was gaining popularity we all proclaimed that it was the beginning of the paperless office.  But the paper companies weren’t scared. Paper sales went through the roof because now we had more information to print out, copy and share with each other. Now there are a variety of document sharing services, including free ones like Google Docs, while allow immediate sharing of and collaboration of documents without having to print out 5 copies for the group to mark up.  It saves money, time and is much more efficient.

Furthermore, as the quality of recycled content paper has gone up to photo quality level and the cost has gone down to below the cost of “new” paper, it clearly makes no sense not to include the procurement of recycled printer and copier paper in your corporate sustainability plan.

(3) Go Paperless with your invoices. PayPal and Google Checkout both have electronic invoicing capabilities for those of you who process payments via credit card, and for many companies, their PayPal and Google Checkout accounts are tied directly to their corporate checking accounts for seemless, and transaction fee free payment processing.  They both offer a variety of export formats and integrate with popular accounting packages like QuickBooks and Microsoft Accounting.  

No more 3 copy carbon based invoices, no gas guzzling postmen delivering the mail and no more licking envelopes!

(4) Recycle Everything. Soda cans, newspapers, used equipment, furniture and materials (if you’re manufacturing things) all carry a price.  Aluminum cans trade for around $ .80 a pound (32 12 ounce cans = 1 pound) – so figure you can sell them to a local recycler for a bit better than half of that.  Doesn’t sound like a lot, but when you have an office full of Red Bull crazed employees or “Diet Coke Fiends” it can actually add up relatively quickly.   

List your used equipment on Craigslist or Google for a local company that will pick up and “recycle” your used equipment – or better yet, donate it to a local charity and take the tax deduction.  Goodwill and the Salvation Army will send out a truck to pick up larger items and most likely make weekly or monthly trips through your area.

(5) Offset Your Carbon Footprint with Carbon Credits

While Reducing, Reusing and Recycling is key in preventing climate change, offsetting your carbon emissions is the next great step in the preservation of our environment for generations to come. The Carbon Calculator Math is below, or you could use a Carbon Footprint Calculator at ecoaidnow.com/Calculators.aspx

To offset your carbon emissions simply means to neutralize your part in the polluting of our environment. In technical terms, a carbon offset is a certificate representing the reduction of one metric ton (2,205 lbs) of carbon dioxide emissions.

Certified Projects are developed such as a reforestation project that reduces carbon dioxide emissions, every ton of emissions reduced will result in the creation of one certified carbon offset (ecoaidnow.com)

Since carbon dioxide emissions are the principal cause of climate change, purchasing carbon offsets is key to promoting a greener environment.

When you offset your personal carbon emissions, you are doing your much-needed part in helping to put an end to global warming and climate change. In addition to making the world a better place, you just might also score a few popularity points with your friends and family.

Going Green at work doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to build a new building out of used tires, or procure all new energy saving computer and office equipment.  It is possible to work towards carbon neutrality without breaking the bank, and then supplement your efforts with cost-effective carbon credits.

Dr. Ken Pollock is EcoAid’s Chief Executive Officer, sets the strategy for the company. www.ecoaidnow.com. Read more of his articles at www.buycarboncreditsandoffsets.com. In addition, he will be launching http://carbonprofessionalschool.com in the near future to provide the training and tools for individuals, businesses and institutions. He has a PhD in Chemical Engineering.

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Assessing The Environmental Impact Of Products ? Introduction To Lifecycle Assessment

Assessing The Environmental Impact Of Products ? Introduction To Lifecycle Assessment

2010 marks the year in which consumers everywhere are more conscious about what they buy and how their purchases impact our planet. Consumers now demand “green” products but there is a lot of misunderstanding of how “green” a product truly is. This article provides the reader a brief introduction to “Life Cycle Assessment” or” LCA”, a tool used to understand the real environmental impact of a product. At the end of the LCA overview, the reader will be introduced to an LCA alternative that eco3P.com, the internet’s largest vendor driven eco marketplace, uses to help its vendor communicate to consumers how they identify the “greenness” of their products.

What is LCA?

LCA evaluates the environmental impact of a product from a lifecycle point of view, that is, from the birth(manufacturing) to the death(disposal, end use) of a product. LCA quantifies the environmental impact of not only the product itself, but also its manufacturing, distribution, use, and disposal. Other references to LCA are: “life cycle analysis”, “cradle to grave”, “eco-balancing”,” material flow analysis “, or “product auditing”.

In order to identify which products are truly “green” and to quantify the carbon footprint along the supply chain, a LCA must be undergone. This can be extremely complicated by taking into account every single metric such as the amount of energy used, raw material being sourced, and how much waste (solid, liquid, and gaseous) is generated. To simplify the analysis, the second generation impacts, for example the energy required to source the coal, transport the coal, and then heat the coal to create the fire used to manufacture and mould the raw material, should not be accounted for.

WHY LCA?

Consumers now demand that companies identify their products ecological footprint. This is normally communicated by using eco labels. However, in order to get an eco label from a governing body you must provide a LCA of your product. This will involve a higher overhead cost but it could also provide you with a sustainable competitive advantage over your rivals.

There are two main steps in establishing an LCA. Step 1: Describe which emissions will occur and which raw materials are used during the life of a product. This is usually referred to as the inventory step.

Emissions: Carbon Dioxide is not the only greenhouse gas that is emitted during the manufacturing process. Others include Nitrous Oxide , Methane , Hydrofluorocarbon gases, Perfluorocarbons, Sulphur Hexafluoride. Raw materials: Certain raw materials that are used are harmful in various stages of a products lifecycle. Take for example Cadmium – a bluish-white metal that is found naturally in the earth’s crust. Cadmium is a pliable metal and does not easily corrode and is normally used to replace lead in products like jewellery. However, Cadmium is highly toxic and can cause cancer. Step 2: Assess what the impacts of these emissions and raw material depletions are. This is referred to as the impact assessment step.

UNDERSTANDING BASIC LIFE CYCLE ARCHETYPES

Let’s look at furniture from a life cycle perspective. There is a relatively small impact during its use. Most of the impact is in the raw material and disposal stage. However for a domestic appliance, the impact occurs in its use mainly due to the energy consumption of the product. The furniture would be an ideal candidate to repurpose so that new raw materials do not need to be sourced, which has a large impact, and the domestic appliance would be an ideal candidate to re-engineer in the manufacturing phase to make it more energy efficient.

HOW “GREEN” IS IDENTIFIED AT ECO3P.COM

Since LCA can be tedious and expensive with no real ROI for smaller manufacturers, eco3P.com, the internet’s largest free eco marketplace, makes it easier for its vendors to list their green products using a scaled down LCA. As longs as eco3P’s vendor`s products have at least 1 green attribute, they can leverage eco3P’s platform to sell their organic, fair trade, vegan or eco-friendly products. These attributes are: The product is recyclable, energy efficient, does not emit greenhouse gas, non toxic, contains no recycled material, made from renewable resources, contains eco packaging, and is manufactured responsibly.

Although it is not a perfect system, it is a start and a right step forward to make environmentally friendly products more accessible.

About http://www.eco3P.com: eco3P provides a centralized hub for vendors giving them more exposure than their standalone sites and making it easy for eco-conscious shoppers to find products that they are looking for. Vendors set up virtual storefronts on eco3P to post their eco-products and tell shoppers about who they are and what they do to help contribute to a greener planet.

For every dollar spent on products listed by our sellers, eco3P will help conserve 10 sq2 feet of rainforest. Through our premium services we also plant trees.

Whether you are looking to buy a solar powered water fountain, an e-bike, or fair trade goods, eco3P is your eco-marketplace.

eco3P provides a centralized hub for vendors selling eco products . The virtual storefronts setup helps the vendors to attain fair trade and exposure than that achieved form their standalone site. Simplifying the searching process of eco-friendly shoppers aspiring to find products concerning organic clothing.

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Is Bottled Water Any Better Than Tap Water? The Shocking Truth Revealed

Is Bottled Water Any Better Than Tap Water? The Shocking Truth Revealed

If you’re wondering is bottled water better than tap water, then you may have a nasty shock in store. Many people mistakenly think that drinking the bottled variety is healthier. Find out the truth here and also the only way to protect your health.

Is bottled water better than tap?

In a word, no.

Despite the glossy adverts of pristine mountains and pure springs, the reality is a world away. Many of the top brands are actually bottled at the same source as your treated household supply.

The worrying part is that although the tap variety has many hundreds of chemicals in, the bottled variety has far less regulation, especially if it is not shipped over state lines.

On top of this you have the risk of BPA or Bisphenol A, which is a harmful chemical used in the manufacturing of the plastic and which can leach into the contents.

A recent study also found much higher levels of bacteria in bottled water as opposed to tap.

So you have no guarantee of purity and safety and drinking the bottled type is extremely expensive. It can cost as much per gallon as gas for your car, if you work it out! It also takes over 2000 times more energy to produce bottled water and adds to the 60 million bottles thrown away each day in the US and unnecessarily filling up the landfill sites.

So what’s the solution?

This is actually two-fold. First, as tap water is generally poor quality and contains traces of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, chlorine and lead to name just a few, a quality home filtration system should be used.

Then you can simply bottle your own pure and healthy supply to take with you, saving money and helping the environment at the same time by reducing your carbon footprint.

The best home systems start from just 0 for a countertop model and work out to only around 10c a gallon.

The best ones are activated carbon block filters with a two-stage process. These can remove over 99% of all the harmful contaminants to leave you with pure, healthy and great tasting water.

Now you know the answer to, is bottled water better than tap, and also know that neither is that great, why not consider using a decent home filter to protect your present health and future well-being.

As part of your research, why not visit my website below to see which water filtration products I recommend and use.

Discover how to get the healthiest and purest water available today.

 

Ray Hamilton is a dedicated advocate and researcher of the incredible benefits of safe, clean, healthy filtered water. Take a moment to visit his site now at http://www.healthy-filtered-water.com and discover which products he recommends after extensive research.

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Demand for eco-friendly items is still on the rise

Demand for eco-friendly items is still on the rise

Comparison-shopping for just the right product now includes a demand for the lowest carbon footprint.

When shoppers are given choices, for example, many say that eco-friendly products are a meaningful way to make an individual contribution to the good health of the planet.

“If that many people come together and act on their convictions to reduce chemicals and contaminants from reaching landfill, it’s going to make such a difference to protecting our land, air, and waterways,” says Steve Matyas, president of office supplies retailer, Staples Canada.

Recycling is a continuous service at Staples where handy, in-store bins for used ink and toner cartridges, rechargeable batteries and unwanted cell phones, make it easy to discard these toxic items.

“And in keeping with this commitment, our stores have also stocked the shelves with at least 2,000 eco-friendly products,” Matyas continued. “As a low-cost retailer, it’s important for us to weigh value alongside our environmental impact. The answer was to give Canadian shoppers a lot of choice in sustainable products and supplies.”

Details about these items are available online at www.staples/environmentfrom/community. Here’s a snapshot of just a few:

• Eco-friendly notebooks by Staples, made from 80 percent bagasse, a sugarcane waste by product. The bagasse line also uses eco-conscious vegetable and water-based inks for printing.

• Exercise books by Hilroy are made from 30 percent post-consumer waste and environmentally friendly ink.

• Scissors byWestcot KleenEarth have green handles made from 70 percent recycled plastic. And, the microband handles also have antibacterial protection against the growth of germs.

• Eco Easyreport covers by Staples are not only reusable, they are made with a starch-based cellulose and that makes them biodegradable.

• Chipboard binders by Avery are made 100 per cent recycled chipboard.

“Perhaps of equal importance, our company goal is to eliminate polyvinyl chloride (PVC) from all brand packaging by the fall of 2010,” Matyas said. “Customers tell us they want the most eco-friendly products available, so this year we’ve taken the initiative to develop PVC-free packaging. Once in place, shoppers can be confidant about this environmental contribution with any Staples item they buy.”

Comparison-shopping for just the right product now includes a demand for the lowest carbon footprint.

When shoppers are given choices, for example, many say that eco-friendly products are a meaningful way to make an individual contribution to the good health of the planet.

“If that many people come together and act on their convictions to reduce chemicals and contaminants from reaching landfill, it’s going to make such a difference to protecting our land, air, and waterways,” says Steve Matyas, president of office supplies retailer, Staples Canada.

Recycling is a continuous service at Staples where handy, in-store bins for used ink and toner cartridges, rechargeable batteries and unwanted cell phones, make it easy to discard these toxic items.

“And in keeping with this commitment, our stores have also stocked the shelves with at least 2,000 eco-friendly products,” Matyas continued. “As a low-cost retailer, it’s important for us to weigh value alongside our environmental impact. The answer was to give Canadian shoppers a lot of choice in sustainable products and supplies.”

Details about these items are available online at www.staples/environmentfrom/community. Here’s a snapshot of just a few:

• Eco-friendly notebooks by Staples, made from 80 percent bagasse, a sugarcane waste by product. The bagasse line also uses eco-conscious vegetable and water-based inks for printing.

• Exercise books by Hilroy are made from 30 percent post-consumer waste and environmentally friendly ink.

• Scissors byWestcot KleenEarth have green handles made from 70 percent recycled plastic. And, the microband handles also have antibacterial protection against the growth of germs.

• Eco Easyreport covers by Staples are not only reusable, they are made with a starch-based cellulose and that makes them biodegradable.

• Chipboard binders by Avery are made 100 per cent recycled chipboard.

“Perhaps of equal importance, our company goal is to eliminate polyvinyl chloride (PVC) from all brand packaging by the fall of 2010,” Matyas said. “Customers tell us they want the most eco-friendly products available, so this year we’ve taken the initiative to develop PVC-free packaging. Once in place, shoppers can be confidant about this environmental contribution with any Staples item they buy.”

For over 25 years, News Canada has been providing the media with ready-to-use, timely, credible and copyright-free news content. Editors, broadcasters, web and video content providers rely on News Canada for newsworthy content to effectively enhance their websites, newspapers and broadcasts.

www.newscanada.com

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Packaging Materials and the Environment

Packaging Materials and the Environment

With growing pressure on the environment and the need for the nation to economise, it’s now more important than ever to conserve and reuse packaging.

Reusing packaging is the best form of recycling, because it doesn’t require further use of energy, either in converting or transporting the packaging prior to use.

As a specialist packaging supplies company we believe we have a duty to encourage Customers to give greater thought to the packaging they buy and make better use of the packaging materials they retain.

As a packaging supplier, does this mean fewer sales of packaging materials? On the contrary, we’re finding that Customers are more conscious about packaging generally and are more comfortable ordering packaging materials from a supplier that:

• Understands the Customers’ needs and is able to work to reduce their carbon footprint and support their sustainable environmental policy

• Offers environmentally better packaging, such as recycled, reusable and degradable packaging products

• Advises them on ways to economise on packaging and reduce the overall weight of packaging materials used

So whether you’re looking to save money or save the planet, buying the right packaging for the job, planning ahead for its re-use and using recycled packaging materials are some of the key steps to take.

The most important part of this cycle of recycled cardboard boxes is you the buyer. Without people willing to buy recycled cardboard boxes it would just end up in landfill. So make sure when you next buy packaging you ask for recycled packaging.

With this in mind, read our top 10 tips to reuse some of your packaging, save on packaging costs and also help the environment:

Make sure your packaging doesn’t cost the earth! For further information, visit http://www.davpack.co.uk or call Davpack on 01332 821200.

Make sure your packaging doesn’t cost the earth! For further information, visit our packaging website or call Davpack on 01332 821200.

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Eco-Friendly Nappy Use: Nappies – 3 Ways to Use Disposable Nappies in an Eco Friendly Way

Eco-Friendly Nappy Use: Nappies – 3 Ways to Use Disposable Nappies in an Eco Friendly Way

Eco-Friendly Nappy Use: Nappies – 3 Ways to Use Disposable Nappies in an Eco Friendly Way

Can disposable nappies ever be eco-friendly?

Eco-friendly Nappy Use: How ‘green’ are the nappies your baby wears?

Yes! When using disposable nappies you have choices that will reduce the carbon footprint of your family. A ‘hybrid’ stash will ease your eco-conscience – easily! In a moment we’ll look at 3 ways of using disposable nappies in a more eco-friendly way. (+1)

Of course you don’t think about landfill when using a disposable nappy on your baby; however we all know that this is less than optimal. When you roll out your wheelie bin full of smelly nappies, your eco-conscience does a little cringe…

As we are all busy, we don’t always have the time to research our options, and your Mum said that cloth nappies are such hard work, right? How can you reduce that environmental impact of using disposable nappies, and easily?

Let’s Consider 3 Ways to Use Your Disposables in a More Eco-Friendly Way.

1. Pre-cycle Your Disposable Nappies.

Pre-cycling is simply preventing excess waste coming into your home. When Using disposable nappies, the best way to do this is to buy in bulk! Bulk buying means less packaging waste, less to and fro shopping trips and the added benefit of a discount or special price.

2. Use Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies.

Yes, there are disposable nappies you can bury in your garden to turn into rich soil. There are varieties you can add to a worm farm or compost. Others have ‘earth friendlier’ components. Still more can be ripped open and flushed down the toilet. What if you bought a bag of more eco friendly disposables now and then?

3. Empty Wet Nappies into Your Garden.

Simply, the guts of each nappy is a gentle fertilizer. Emptying the nappy and scratching it in, covering it with mulch actually adds the same water retaining crystals that you can buy to help drought proof your garden. Then, a fraction of the usual waste amount goes into the bin. What if you did this with one each day? Watch your garden grow. If you are feeling squeamish, think of all that manure or blood and bone you add to your soil, use gloves and wash your hands!

What’s the +1? Hybridising Your Stash, Starting With 1 Modern Cloth Nappy.

A hybrid stash includes regular disposable nappies, eco-friendly disposable nappies, and modern cloth nappies. Just like a hybrid car, it combines old and new, mixes different types to give you the most flexibility, and best of all, the opportunity to reduce your carbon footprint. The ‘modern’ cloth nappy is different. It is shaped, it has simple fastenings, it doesn’t need soaking, and you have control over how big or small its environmental impact is. We have washing machines these days, too. They are simple to use. Especially if you start with just one. One ‘green’ nappy...

With a hybrid stash, you can begin your baby’s life on a foundation of growing sustainability.

As you discover more, all the tips and tricks, you’ll naturally raise a ‘lower carbon’ baby. Your conscience will earn great eco karma, and you will encourage those around you to start with one green nappy too.

Here’s your challenge:

If you acted on one of these ideas, which would be the best for your family? Buying your next lot as bulk disposables, grabbing a bag of eco friendly disposables each month, Emptying the occasional ‘convenience’ nappy under the bushes in the backyard and covering it with mulch, or Looking into hybridising your nappy stash, starting with one washable, reusable, modern cloth nappy?

And now Charndra invites you to win a modern cloth nappy on My Green Nappy, by registering to play in the regular giveaways held on this informative and popular site.

You’ll discover great tips, secrets to finding bargains, and everything you need to know about green nappies and using any sort of nappy in a more environmentally friendly way.

Article from articlesbase.com

Our vision: Create radically sustainable alternatives to conventional plastics and foams. Ecovative is a bio-tech startup creating biological composites which displace conventional foams and plastics, such as Expanded Polystyrene. MycoBond™, our patent pending technology, uses a growing organism to transform low value agricultural byproducts, into strong biological composites. These composites have applications in multiple markets, including commercial insulation, structural cores, and protective packaging. Ecovatives long term goal is to become the leader in sustainable materials, developing grown replacements for foams, plastic, and wood like products. In the near-term Ecovative is focussing its comercilization efforts on the protective packaging market, where there is a dire need for a product to replace the huge amounts of EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) which is used every year in shipping.

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How to Keep Things Out of Your Recycling Bin: Tips to Get the Most Out of Trash

How to Keep Things Out of Your Recycling Bin: Tips to Get the Most Out of Trash

EnviroCitizen.org is a big fan of recycling! It keeps a lot of waste out of landfills and helps our society to be more efficient. By definition, waste is unused refuse. The key here is “unused”. So, the question becomes: How can you use it?

Try to think of creative ways to use the items that you are planning to put in your recycling bin. Could it be used instead of recycled immediately? Again, recycling is great, but it takes energy to recycle stuff, which uses fossil fuels and emits pollution. If you can make use of your recyclables you can reduce your environmental impact, your carbon footprint and the amount of stuff that recycling plants have to process.

A few suggestions of what you can do with different recyclable goods by EnviroCitizen.org:

What could you do with the egg crate that you normally recycle? Many people reuse egg crates for planting. They make perfect single-seed planters! They can also be added to your compost pile.
What can you do with the cardboard packaging that you normally put into your recycling? You can use it to write on if you’re a list-maker, give it to your children to draw on, use it to package gifts or and you could even draw or paint on it to make a more personalized gift.
What could you do with the soda cans that you usually recycle? Soda cans can be great materials for art projects! Try making a mobile. You could cut up the cans and transform the pieces into unique shapes!

EnviroCitizen.org strongly advocates recycling, however, we also want to point out there are other alternatives to managing waste.    You can use your creativity and imagination to think of different ways to use things that you would usually recycle. You’ve probably heard the popular catchphrase, “Reduce. Reuse. Recycle.” By coming up with innovative ways to manage your waste, you can implement all three components You can reduce both the waste that you contribute to the landfill and the waste that you contribute to recycling plants. You can reuse the recyclables that would normally go into the recycling bin. When you can’t reuse something or when you’re done reusing the recyclable item, you can recycle it!

EnviroCitizen.org knows that it’s up to us to make smart decisions that reduce our waste, whether it’s through buying products with less packaging, buying in bulk or deciding to reuse recyclable goods. Let’s all try to reduce our environmental impact and carbon footprint through creative, eco-friendly thinking!

Envirocitizen.org is a comprehensive ecommerce website that combines robust commerce, content, and community.  We believe that we have created the most comprehensive site to date to make eco-friendly products, services, and information available to individuals who wish to live a green, more eco-friendly lifestyle.  Our site offers a very broad and diverse array of eco-friendly products as well as comprehensive, authoritative information and environmental education.  Additionally, users can enjoy the sense of community created by participating in our Forum.

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Tips to help clean the planet that you can do in your own backyard.

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Bottle Boxes

Bottle Boxes

Bottle boxes need to give extra protection than a normal cardboard box due to the wine bottles being made of glass. Most wine is sold in glass bottles and are sealed using corks. An increasing number of wine producers have been using other closures such as screwcaps or plastic corks. In addition to being less expensive, alternative closures prevent cork taint, although they have been blamed for other problems such as excessive reduction.

Some wines are packaged in heavy plastic bags within cardboard boxes, and are called box wines. These wines are normally accessed via a tap on the side of the box. Box wine can maintain an acceptable degree of freshness for up to a month after opening, while bottled wine will more rapidly oxidize, and is considerably degraded within a few days.

The environmental considerations of wine packaging reveal benefits and drawbacks of both bottled and boxed wines. Glass used to make bottles has a good environmental reputation, as it is completely recyclable, whereas plastics used in box wines are considered to be much less environmentally friendly. However, wine bottle manufacturers have been cited for clean air act violations. A New York Times editorial puported that box wine, being lighter in package weight, has a reduced carbon footprint from its distribution. Boxed wine plastics, even though possibly recyclable, can be more labor-intensive and expensive to process than glass bottles. And while a wine box is recyclable, its plastic wine bladder most likely is not.

As late as the mid-1600s, French vintners did not use cork stoppers, using oil-soaked rags stuffed into the necks of bottles instead.

Natural cork closures are used for about 80% of the 20 billion bottles of wine produced each year. After a decline in use as wine-stoppers due to the increase in the use of cheaper synthetic alternatives, cork wine-stoppers are making a comeback and currently represent approximately 60% of wine-stoppers today.

Cork is a suitable material for use as a bottle stopper. Because of the cellular structure of cork, it is easily compressed upon insertion into a bottle and will expand to form a tight seal. The interior diameter of the neck of glass bottles tends to be inconsistent, making this ability to seal through variable contraction and expansion an important attribute. However, unavoidable natural flaws, channels, and cracks in the bark make the cork itself highly inconsistent. In a 2005 closure study 45% of corks showed gas leakage during pressure testing both from the sides of the cork as well as through the cork body itself.

Since the mid 1990s, a number of wine brands have switched to alternative wine closures such as synthetic plastic stoppers, screwcaps, or other closures. Screwcaps are often seen as a cheap alternative destined only for the low grade wines. These alternatives to real cork have their own properties, some advantageous and others controversial. For example, while screwtops are generally considered to offer a trichloroanisole (TCA) free seal they reduce the oxygen transfer rate to almost zero, which can lead to reductive qualities in the wine. TCA is one of the primary causes of cork taint in wine. However, in recent years major cork producers have developed methods that remove most TCA from natural wine corks. Natural cork stoppers are important because they allow oxygen to interact with wine for proper aging, and are best suited for bold red wines purchased with the intent to age.

The study “Analysis of the life cycle of Cork, Aluminum and Plastic Wine Closures,” commissioned by cork manufacturer Amorim and made public in December 2008, concluded that cork is the most environmentally responsible stopper, in a one-year life cycle analysis comparison with the plastic stoppers and aluminum screwcaps.

Kevin Thomas works for Davpack, a uk packaging supplier. Their friendly staff are waiting to help you choose the right packaging for your business.

Text and content © Copyright of Davenport Paper Co. Ltd 2009

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WONG: One man’s garbage is another man’s fortune. In Bangladesh, used plastic bottles that are found in garbage dumps and litter drains and roadside dishes are providing much-needed income to impoverished people. They’re also creating a new export commodity for the country. Here’s a closer look. STORY: Over the past five years, the recycling of the Poly Ethylene Terephthalate or PET bottles has steadily grown into an industry in Bangladesh. The extremely poor and street children scavenge the used packaging for food products, beverages and edible oils sell them to factory owners. The factories sort the bottles and containers into different colors before crushing them into pieces to make plastic flakes, which are in high demand from many Southeast Asian countries. Most of the work is done manually. [Parveen Begum, Recycling Worker]: “We have been working in this factory for five long years, we separate colored and white bottles from the dump. Four members of our family are working here and earning our livelihood out of this and living fine by the grace of God.” The flakes are made into fibers and are a base material for clothing, pillows, carpets and polyester sheets. [Sarwar Wadud Chowdhury, Flake Exporters Assoc.]: “Poor people collect these non-traditional items from garbage and the roadside and supply them to our factories. In our factory we sort and recycle them to make PET flakes. These PET flakes are exported to China, Korea, Vietnam and Thailand. Our importers make

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