Menasha Packaging Wins 14 OMA Awards at GlobalShop 2014

Menasha Packaging won 14 of POPAI’s Outstanding Merchandising Achievement (OMA) Awards at GlobalShop 2014 in Las Vegas, Nev. The OMA Awards is the retail merchandising industry’s largest and longest running awards contest.

Menasha received three gold, five silver and six bronze awards in 10 categories, including: Aisle/Category/Department Redesign, Cosmetics and Fragrances, Drug Store, Food, General Merchandise, Healthcare, Mass Merchandise, Snack Products, Soft Drinks and Supermarket. 

Menasha’s winning Gold displays are:

  • Coty Sally Hansen Insta-Dri Walmart Display, a semi-permanent mass merchandise display
  • Katy Perry’s “Killer Queen” Launch Tester for Coty, a semi-permanent cosmetics and fragrances display
  • P&G Vick’s Severe Formula Launch Floor Stand, a temporary healthcare display

Menasha competed in a field of 460 entries from 70 competitors.

“Menasha is honored to have received so many accolades from POPAI this year since the OMA Awards is one of marketing at-retail’s highest recognitions,” said Dennis Bonn, vice president of marketing for Menasha Packaging. “By harnessing the power of retail integration, our team strives to create powerful and effective retail promotional solutions that help our consumer packaged goods (CPG) customers optimally sell, protect and promote their products in stores.”

Displays compete for gold, silver and bronze honors in three divisions based upon length of time in the store: Temporary, Semi-permanent and Permanent. Entries are evaluated on design, engineering, shopper engagement, retail experience, brand performance and sales results. Awards are presented to the most innovative, effective in-store displays that lift sales, make products memorable and entice shoppers to purchase.

The winners were announced on March 19, 2014 at POPAI’s Annual Awards Celebration during GlobalShop 2014. GlobalShop is the world’s largest annual trade show and conference dedicated to store design, visual merchandising and shopper marketing.

About Menasha Packaging
Celebrating 165 years in business, Menasha Packaging Company, LLC, based in Neenah, Wisconsin, is a subsidiary of Menasha Corporation and has more than 2,400 employees at locations nationwide. Menasha Packaging is a leading provider of graphic consumer packaging, merchandising solutions, corrugated packaging, food packaging, shipping containers, material handling solutions, pack-out and fulfillment services. With a network of design, sales service centers, corrugated and paperboard manufacturing plants, and fulfillment facilities located throughout the United States, the company’s mission is to help its customers protect, move and promote their products better than anyone else. Visit its website at www.menashapackaging.com.  

About Menasha Corporation
Menasha Corporation is a leading corrugated and plastic packaging manufacturer and supply chain solutions provider specializing in retail merchandising packaging and displays, plastic reusable containers and pallets, protective packaging interiors, and packaging supply chain and fulfillment services. Menasha Corporation’s products and services are used by major food, beverage, consumer products, healthcare, pharmaceutical, industrial and automotive companies. Established in 1849, Menasha Corporation is one of America’s oldest privately held, family-owned manufacturing companies. Headquartered in Neenah, Wisconsin, the company employs approximately 4,000 employees in over 75 facilities in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information, visit www.menasha.com

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Menasha Packaging to Energize GlobalShop 2014

Menasha Packaging will spotlight how it’s energizing clients’ sales with powerful end-to-end solutions during GlobalShop 2014 from March 18 to 20 at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nev. Menasha’s promotional intelligence team will connect with attendees at booth 3241 throughout the annual trade show. 

For 165 years, Menasha has been dedicated to helping its clients move and sell more product. As a market leader, Menasha is able to amplify customers’ retail promotional solutions with exclusive retail insights, resources and innovation. The resulting merchandising solutions are more effective at retail by grabbing attention, increasing trial, strengthening brands and increasing ROI.

With its commitment to providing complete merchandising solutions and a comprehensive network of operations, services and co-pack solutions, the promotional experts of Menasha hope tradeshow attendees will be energized by Menasha’s full capabilities. 

“Menasha harnesses the power of retail integration by bridging the gap between consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies and retailers,” says Dennis Bonn, vice president of marketing for Menasha Packaging. “During GlobalShop, our team will demonstrate how Menasha’s array of connections empower manufacturers and retailers to optimally sell, protect and promote their products at retail.” 

GlobalShop is the world’s largest annual trade show and conference dedicated to store design, visual merchandising and shopper marketing.

About Menasha Packaging
Celebrating 165 years in business, Menasha Packaging Company, LLC, based in Neenah, Wisconsin, is a subsidiary of Menasha Corporation and has more than 2,400 employees at locations nationwide. Menasha Packaging is a leading provider of graphic consumer packaging, merchandising solutions, corrugated packaging, food packaging, shipping containers, material handling solutions, pack-out and fulfillment services. With a network of design, sales service centers, corrugated and paperboard manufacturing plants, and fulfillment facilities located throughout the United States, the company’s mission is to help its customers protect, move and promote their products better than anyone else. Visit its website at www.menashapackaging.com.

About Menasha Corporation
Menasha Corporation is a leading corrugated and plastic packaging manufacturer and supply chain solutions provider specializing in retail merchandising packaging and displays, plastic reusable containers and pallets, protective packaging interiors, and packaging supply chain and fulfillment services. Menasha Corporation’s products and services are used by major food, beverage, consumer products, healthcare, pharmaceutical, industrial and automotive companies. Established in 1849, Menasha Corporation is one of America’s oldest privately held, family-owned manufacturing companies. Headquartered in Neenah, Wisconsin, the company employs approximately 4,000 employees in over 75 facilities in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information, visit www.menasha.com.

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Hands-on Team Player

Q&A with:

Peter DiDonato, owner of DiDonato Design

Judy Dixon, vice president of production at Hornall Anderson

Terri Goldstein, CEO of The Goldstein Group

Pamela Long, director of client services at Little Big Brands

John Nunziato, founder and creative director of Little Big Brands

Faster and cheaper has been the business directive from time immemorial. This desire, Little Big Brands’ founder and creative director John Nunziato says, is fueling a disturbing modern trend in package design. “Because of timing and cost being hero, people are approving PDFs as proofs,” he explains. “This type of proofing will most likely result in a client who’s disappointed when the product gets printed because they’ve seen the image in a very different way,” Nunziato says, noting that packages printed on white ink look different from prints on white paper and very different from images viewed on screen. A physical prototype can more clearly communicate concepts and how the package will look in different retail environments.

A prototype also lets everyone involved in the process, including the designer, brand manager and retail buyer, examine the concept closely.
A consumer packaged goods company understands the proposed direction much earlier in the process as well. “The ability to actually hold a prototype or walk up to it—depending on the project—really accentuates the detail,” Hornall Anderson’s vice president of production Judy Dixon notes. “It’s amazing how many details you realize about a design concept once you see it in 3-D.”

Nunziato adds, “That [the prototype review stage] is when the brand manager really starts to fall in love with the design idea. A prototype gives them a real package that they can go to the store with and put on the shelf. They can keep it around at eye level. They can send it to other people for review.

“It’s also easier for clients to be able to visualize type and color tweaks compared to a 3-D rendering or even a lay flat,” he adds. “A prototype can spur more creativity from the client side. I think it can even lead to some buy in from their side and result in a few more dollars invested in the project because they can see just how beautiful the brand’s going to look.”

To make sure that designers and brand managers are getting the most out of their prototypes, Little Big Brands’ director of client services Pamela Long recommends using a service that’s flexible enough to partner on some of the decisions. “They need to be able to roll with the changes,” she remarks.

Nunziato warns that designers should avoid services that “just receive a file, run it and say, ‘Well, that’s what we received.’” Prototyping services with this philosophy don’t add to the creative process. “I believe creativity continues from the agency to the prototypers to prepress to the printers,” Nunziato explains. “But I believe some of them are not using their creativity. So you want to make sure the prototype house you’re using is asking lots of questions. You want to make sure that the prototyper is invested in the client’s brand as much as you are because they’re a part of the project now and not just a piece of the process.”

That’s why Terri Goldstein, CEO of The Goldstein Group, lists service, a consultative approach and knowledge of retail environments as her top three criteria for choosing a prototype house. A commitment to customer service will help ensure that the prototype house will not only manufacture a viable prototype but also will build a plan for the packaging supplier for making the final packages. A consultative approach helps an agency get the most out of the technical expertise of the prototype house. Knowledge of the retail environment will help ensure that the package design’s intent is met despite how the package is displayed.

Goldstein explains that a good prototype house can then contribute to the design process by making sure that the best substrates and coatings are chosen for the project. “Often a brand can be sitting on the bottom shelf or way up on the top,” she says. “A prototype house that truly understands the retail environment can note how elements might look darker on a shelf or what parts of the design are likely to be covered by shelf tags. A good prototype house also keeps up with the latest technologies and substrates so they can make suggestions that adjust for these conditions.” These suggestions can have a great impact on the efficacy of the final design.

That’s why Peter DiDonato, owner of DiDonato Design, says the first and the topmost question he asks himself when choosing a prototyper is, “Do I trust them?”

“Yes, you have to consider price and quality,” he adds. “But it really comes down to the person you’re working with.”

When you trust that person, Nunziato says, you know that everyone is working toward the same goal. “I trust that they’re a business that’s invested in building beautiful brands with our agency,” he explains. “As a business owner and creative director, I believe it’s important to let creative people be creative. I try to find the ‘specialness’ in a brand and in my team, and, of course, manage expectations.”

Goldstein adds that businesses can quickly reap the financial rewards from a good design-firm and prototype-house relationship. “A good prototype service paints a picture of how colors are met with exact formulas, how blends are achieved, basically how everything is broken down,” she says. “When a client goes to their package printer with a prototype from a great comp house, they don’t have to stay at the printer for two, 15-hour days. They simply say, ‘Here’s the target and here’s how you hit it.’

“My mandate is never to let a design go out of my studio without a comp that the client has signed off on and the formula to hit that target,” Goldstein remarks. “That’s how you get great brands that look as good on shelf as the phase one concept the client fell in love with.”

A peek behind the curtain
In our December 2013 issue, Package Design will showcase prototype services companies as well as manufacturers
of prototyping equipment in a product and services focus on prototyping. Here’s a sneak peak at some of the early submissions:

Manufacturing Target Development
guyconti.com
Guy Conti Art & Design Inc. specializes in package design exploration and development. Specialties include folding carton, tube, jar, bottle, box and bag prototyping. Package decorating and finishing options include foil stamping, custom embossing, custom spraying, chrome finishing, shrink wrapping, laser die-cutting, custom dry transfer and silk screening. The firm can also create digital proofs and prepare mechanicals and production targets.

Packaging Prototypes
www.sgkinc.com
Schawk’s brand deployment packaging prototype services range from providing comps for “live” local market tests in-store, to production comps used to sell new products at retail, to hero comps suitable for media exposure and public relations opportunities. SGK can produce a wide range of CPG prototypes, comps and sales samples, particularly for the food, beverage, health and drug industries including: both rigid and flexible packaging, comprising cartons, pouches and shrink labels, which can be produced using clear, white and metallized substrates, along with heat shrinkable films.

Complex Prototypes
www.bridgepremedia.com 
Bridge Premedia prototypes allow clients to reproduce metallics, white ink, spot varnishes, and embossing effects on production substrates such as shrink overwrap film, shrink sleeves, foil, paperboard, biaxially oriented PP, PET and corrugated board. Prototypes offered include cartons, pouches, shrink label and overwrap, rapid prototyping of jar and bottle structures, and interactive virtual prototyping.

Food Packaging Prototypes
printsure.com
As a digital printer of FDA-approved food packaging, PrintSure can manufacture prototype pouches, cartons and shrink sleeves that can be used for direct or indirect contact with food.

3-D Structural Prototypes
www.ibcshell.com
IBC Shell produces 3-D printed prototypes on a Cimquest fused deposition modeler to communicate the beauty and confirm the functionality of packaging concepts. The 3-D CAD Buildware can transform design concepts into complex, finished decorated prototypes that can also incorporate moving components.

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SGK Appoints Brian Silver Vice President of Business Development, SGK Retail Practice

SGK (NYSE: SGK), formerly marketed as Schawk, Inc., a leading global brand development, activation and deployment company that drives brand performance, announced that it has appointed Brian Silver to the position of vice president of business development, SGK Retail Practice.

Silver will be responsible for leading business development initiatives across a global marketplace within SGK’s Retail Practice. The SGK Retail Practice brings ground-breaking shopper strategy ideas to leading global and regional retailers in the food, drug, mass-market and club categories by offering the right combination of unique solutions and expertise that are unmatched in developing more desirable and profitable brands.

Kim Cooper, senior vice president, business development, SGK Retail Practice, stated, “We are thrilled to have Brian join our business development team. Brian’s understanding of the retail marketing process from concept to execution and expertise in navigating inside the Retail organization make him uniquely positioned to help our clients achieve higher brand performance.”

“I am excited to be a part of SGK’s Retail Practice and with an organization that is dedicated to delivering brand performance,” said Silver. “I look forward to leveraging SGK’s brand development and brand deployment services to drive engagement, purchase, loyalty and repurchase for our client’s brands.”

Prior to joining SGK’s Retail Practice, Silver’s most recent experience includes executive sales positions with Big Red Rooster, a brand experience firm and Miller Zell, a company that creates retail environments. Previous roles earlier in his career included driving business development for providers of in-store marketing and selling packaging solutions to major retailers and consumer packaged goods manufacturers.

Silver earned a MBA in Marketing & Strategic Planning from Case Western Reserve University – Weatherhead School of Management and a BSBA in Marketing & Logistics from John Carroll University.

SGK is a leading global brand development, activation and deployment company that drives brand performance. By creating brands, helping sell brands, producing brand assets and protecting brand equities, we help our clients achieve higher brand performance. SGK’s global footprint spans more than 20 countries. SGK was formerly marketed as Schawk, Inc.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Seductive Spirits

As design and marketing professionals, we are tasked with the challenge of conveying the unique charm of a frosty beer, a ruby-hued Syrah, or a sublime single-malt Scotch to a fickle consumer who may only have a few seconds of shopping to spare. Often our goal of seducing the eye of passing strangers is made even more challenging when natural cues such as product color, taste and aroma are obscured by the package we are decorating.

Our solutions must be fluid and forward thinking, as we try and stay ahead of a wave of new product formulations, packaging formats and emerging product categories. Sometimes, we find inspiration in other consumer packaged goods markets.

The allure of clear
In the early 90s, marketers and consumers alike were in love with the novelty of clear products. This phenomenon began in the personal hygiene category with Ivory Soap and crossed over into soft drinks with products like Pepsi Clear.

At this same time, Miller Brewing Company, understanding that light beer sales were reaching a fever pitch, began tinkering with its filtering process and succeeded in producing a low calorie, low carbohydrate beer that had the lucky side effect of coming out of the process completely clear. Hoping that it had just the right product to tap into the Zeitgeist, Miller quickly began taste tests for its new miracle brew. As luck would have it, in blind tastings consumers claimed they enjoyed the product as much as the old-fashioned “beer-colored” stuff.

A plan for test marketing the newly dubbed Miller Clear was hatched with a product debut scheduled in Austin, TX; Minneapolis, MN; and Richmond, VA. Our agency was promptly engaged to work on the branding and packaging. The brief was simple—highlight the clarity of the beverage in an attempt to visually combat the negative image of beer as being overly heavy and too filling. In short, our design would telegraph lightness and refreshment.

Our not-so-secret fear was the positive associations of a clear product would be outweighed by the perception of neutrality in flavor, aroma and body. For years, we’d heard from worldly beer aficionados that American beers tasted like water. But our client had a mountain of research claiming lightness was king and that taste had been prevalidated.

To satisfy the brief, we used a brisk, electric blue background to reinforce the idea of lightness and refreshment. We developed elongated, faceted typography for the brand to suggest the purity of ice crystals and flanked the logo with sheaves of grain to dial up the beer cues. We added a beaded up water effect to add a greater sense of refreshment. Despite our attempts, the consumers weren’t impressed. Initial sales seemed promising but repeat trials were slim to non-existent. The product never made it out of the initial test market. It is true that we taste with our eyes.

Color has so much to tell us with beer. In packaging, the colors we choose can help us describe a beer style. Is it a light lager, full-bodied ale, or a hefty stout? We can use color to visually unleash aromas like the pungent whiff of hops or the heavy syrupy scent of malt. Color can help establish a sense of place—a technique that is used to great effect with the emerald forest green wrapping every bottle of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale.

Thinking inside the box
First and foremost, a package is the vessel for delivering a product from the manufacturing facility to the home and it must offer flawless protection at every step along the way. Glass has earned its distinction as the premiere packaging material for wine because it creates an excellent oxygen barrier, enhances product stability on shelf, enables consumers to judge the product inside with their own eyes and offers an elegant look and feel.

On the negative side, glass’s strength-to-weight ratio is inferior to paper or plastic. Graphics are often printed on a secondary label, which increases the cost of goods and rarely takes advantage of the package’s full real estate.

Wine producers have struggled with finding alternatives to glass packaging for decades. The format that seems to be the best candidate for the solution is the bag-in-box or wine box, which has been around in some form or another since the late 60s. Despite the historically low quality reputation of boxed wines, there are many compelling benefits for distributing wine this way. The format offers good shelf- stability after opening, functionality is improved in large formats, there is less packaging waste, and yes, there are also cost savings that can be passed along to the end consumer.

But some companies have debuted boxed wines with promising results. The Wineberry wine box with its hand-applied label takes on the appearance of personal, wooden wine cask. Four Wine’s cylindrical tube, fine matte paper appearance and metallic gold detailing does a nice job of bringing traditional wine material cues to the category.

We are convinced, the consumer will become accustomed to a new form factor, but just like the introduction of well-crafted wines in screw top bottles, boxed wines will take some getting used to. It will be difficult work but if we use the color cues from the language of wine packaging to denote flavor, texture and finish, carefully applied details such as foil, elaborate die cuts and richly textured paper, we can underscore quality messages and reinforce a sense or rarity, care and wine’s idyllic beginnings on a wine box.

Designing for limitations in form can be just as difficult as designing packaging for a challenging new product. Without the ability to see the wine through the box, you have to work that much harder to represent what is inside of it.

By experimenting with new ways of integrating natural materials into box-in-bag structures that conjure up familiar cues such as cork, burlap and straw, we can get consumers to look beyond the workaday utility of a paperboard box and think about what is inside of it. 

Primo Angeli is the design consultant at Primo Angeli Design International (www.primoangeli.com). Angeli has worked on branding, corporate identity and package design projects for several international clients, including DHL, Ben and Jerry’s, Coca-Cola, Guinness, Intel, Nestlé, Robert Mondavi Winery, Xerox, General Foods and AT&T.

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10 key trends in global retail packaging






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/7/2013 12:59:20 PM





A cross-functional team of 10 managers from resealable-closure company Zip-Pak recently completed an intensive 18-month global packaging study.

Zip-Pak’s goal in conducting the study was to openly observe the packaging landscape and the global consumer to better understand and identify prevailing trends, and the drivers behind them. The study involved in-depth interviews with more than 75 industry insiders, including consultants, media, research personnel, packaging school professors, equipment manufacturers, converters, consumer packaged goods executives and retailers. The voice of the consumer played an equally important part in the report.

Top global retail packaging trends

Upon completing the study, Zip-Pak’s team reported on 10 key trends.

1. Changing Demographics and an Aging Population
As many economies face aging populations, packaging and retail stores must accommodate an aging consumer base with more easier-to-open packaging formats, increased readability of packaging and larger font sizes. Retailers will achieve this through access-improved store layouts, improved lighting, stocking popular items on mid-level shelves, and the introduction of a greater range of “healthy product.”

2. Prepared Foods
Although highly mobile, consumers have demonstrated an increased involvement in meal preparation at home. As a key indicator, the study pointed to the growing number of meals that are being cooked in the kitchen by combining additional ingredients to pre-prepared foods. This interest has been supported over the past decade by the considerable growth of pre-prepared, heat-and-eat, or grab-and-go food and meal choices. This trend is expected to continue with increased variety, high quality offerings and more competitive pricing.

 

Supporting this consumer behavior presents an opportunity for packaging development of portion-specific sizes and formats that further extend product life and offer ease of use. Packaging supply chain partners are anticipated to contribute to this shift as well, through the advancement of solutions that deliver enhanced product protection and preservation, tamper indication, and added convenience.

3. Liquids in Flexible Packaging
A growing number of liquid-based brands are adopting flexible packaging formats. From soups to coffee, wine, baby food and energy drinks, consumers appreciate the convenience and portability of a flexible pouch. The packaging supply chain will continue to contribute through advancements in film construction, pouch-forming equipment, and new dispensing technologies. Globally, the trend is growing in the breadth and width of product offerings with some of the greatest inroads made along the Pacific Rim. As one member of the Zip-Pak study team commented, “If you really want to see innovative liquid packaging, just go to Japan.”

4. Sustainability
Environmental responsibility and stewardship have been, and will continue to be, areas of global focus and innovation. A prime example of this is the progression from rigid to flexible packaging, with sustainability being cited in the study as the leading driver. The shift to flexible has also resulted in packaging material reduction for many brands as well as cost reduction when compared to their rigid counterparts. A recent consumer lifestyle research study points to this trend as a “win-win” for brands, as the shift strongly appeals to a growing community of environmentally informed consumers who seek out brands and products that share their concern for the environment.

5. Theft and Shrinkage
Theft and shrinkage remain key concerns for retailers. Packaging companies are being called upon to provide new security measures that safeguard products from theft throughout the entire supply chain, without compromising the consumer’s experience at point-of-sale or during check-out. The industry response has been the introduction of packaging technologies that both enhance the appearance of the products and protect from theft at the same time. Retailer demand for new and innovative approaches to theft prevention is clear; and for inventive packaging suppliers, anti-theft solutions represent an abundance of opportunity.

 

6. Over-Protective Packaging
In the interest of theft protection or tamper-resistance, packaging can often be “over-engineered.” This is evidenced by the hundreds of reported annual emergency room visits for injuries to hands and fingers, the result of unsuccessful consumer attempts to access products “protected” by virtually impenetrable packaging. Packaging solutions that strike a smart, reasonable balance between content and theft protection, and easier-to-open functionality post-purchase, are expected to grow in demand.

7. Compliance Packaging
Driving the advances in compliance packaging has been the universal desire to significantly reduce the number of deaths in the U.S. associated with lack of medication adherence by patients. This fourth leading cause of death in America has associated costs to the healthcare system estimated to be as much as $150 billion annually.

 

Innovative materials and advancements in technology are having a significant impact. Among the many solutions to the issue are enhanced unit dose packaging that offers medication protection and a growing array of blister card packs that improve ease of use and provide more robust patient information. A highly progressive approach to this national concern for patient safety is resulting in the introduction and development of leading-edge packaging solutions designed to help patients remember and follow drug regimens.

8. QR Codes and Mobile Technology
QR codes are continuing to provide a wealth of information for consumer brands, including expanded product information and costs savings in packaging, as products require less in the way of inserts or printed information. Complementary to this are the growing numbers of smartphones and tablets used by consumers to access and share information about products and brands. This behavior shift has resulted in the emergence of “apps” that help guide consumer purchases and decision-making.

 

Thanks to these “apps” the well-known “moment of truth” at point of sale is rapidly being replaced with a “zero moment of truth” as consumers have completed their fact-finding and decision-making process before even entering the store. As a result, packaging with interactive, scan-able links to information resources will continue to grow as brands seek more “screen time” with consumers on their mobile devices. This trend represents a further shift in the ways that retailers and brands effectively engage more knowledgeable, information-equipped consumers.

9. Flexibility vs Speed
Flexibility in the supply chain has become a key driver as large companies have been transitioning into smaller, de-centralized groups of “brand” companies. Equipment makers and manufacturers are facing the demand for shorter runs, more rapid changeovers and the ability to accommodate variety in size, shapes and graphics. Prior to this focus on flexibility, packaging machinery and processing companies were primarily concerned with speed as brands largely approached products with a “one size fits all” mentality. Today, with consumers demanding individual attention and more customized solutions, speed’s reign appears to be on the wane.

10. Increasing Influence of Store Brands
The growth of retail brands represented a noteworthy trend in the study. Nearly 20 percent of all products currently sold by retail stores are store brands. Increased product quality and the appearance of more sophisticated packaging are just two factors contributing to this growth pattern. Retailers are trending “up-market” with best-in-class brands to satisfy a growing segment of premium-quality shoppers. They indicate a willingness to invest in opportunities that represent a differentiated package option from those presented by national brands.

A product’s physical packaging continues to be a key factor in establishing differentiation and preference with consumers. In many product categories, today’s shoppers base their opinions on the quality and value of a product by the physical characteristics of the packaging itself, which include materials and shape, applied graphics and package closure.

This is particularly relevant for store brands marketed in flexible packaging. Here, findings revealed an increased percentage of consumers indicating a preference for resealable closure options that could deliver convenience, maintain freshness, and perform reliably throughout the entire product lifecycle. They also viewed resealable flexible packaging as an enhancement to a brand’s perceived and realized value.

Thanks to a growing list of innovations in both technology and equipment compatibility it is becoming increasingly faster and simpler for companies to capitalize on these preferences and perceptions. In many instances, a resealable solution can be integrated into an existing flexible package in as little as five-to-six weeks, often with no additional capital expenditures required in the product’s supply chain.

Summing it all up
In the dynamic and ever-changing world of packaged goods, opportunities will always abound. One simply needs to be an attentive student of consumers, and the drivers that influence them, to convert forward-thinking and innovative ideas into the packaging success stories of tomorrow.

Source: Zip-Pak

 

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Menasha Packaging Wins 18 OMA Awards at GlobalShop Trade Show

 Menasha Packaging is proud to announce it won 18 of POPAI’s Outstanding Merchandising Achievement (OMA) Awards at GlobalShop 2013 in Chicago, Ill. The OMA Awards is the retail merchandising industry’s largest and longest running awards contest.

Menasha received three gold, seven silver and eight bronze awards in nine categories, including: Convenience Store Retailer, Drug Store Retailer, Grocery and General Merchandise Products, Hair and Skin Care, Health Care, Home and Garden Mass Merchandise Retailer, Services and Transportation, Snack Products and Soft Drinks, and Supermarket Retailer.

Menasha’s winning Gold displays are:

  • Pepsi Football & Soccer Stadium Pallet Topper, a temporary grocery and general merchandise product display created for Pepsi Bottling Company
  • Frito-Lay Back-to-School Skylander Bus Promotion, a semi-permanent mass merchandise retailer display created for Frito-Lay, Inc.
  • P&G ZzzQuil PDQ Display, a temporary drug store retail display created for Procter & Gamble in collaboration with Leo Burnett U.S.A.

In a field of more than 60 competitors and more than 450 total entries, only one firm earned more awards than Menasha Packaging, confirming Menasha’s design leadership in this national competition.

“An OMA Award is among the highest recognition in marketing at-retail, and we are honored to be recognized,” said Dennis Bonn, vice president of marketing for Menasha Packaging. “Our team continues to work hard creating innovative and effective in-store and at-retail displays for our consumer packaged goods (CPG) customers.”

Displays compete for gold, silver and bronze honors in three divisions based upon length of time in the store; Temporary, Semi-permanent and Permanent. Entries are evaluated on design, engineering, shopper engagement, retail experience, brand performance and sales results. Awards are then presented to displays that make products memorable and enticing to consumers.

The winners were announced on April 17, 2013 at POPAI’s Annual Awards Celebration during GlobalShop 2013. GlobalShop is the world’s largest annual trade show and conference dedicated to store design, visual merchandising and shopper marketing.

About Menasha Packaging
Menasha Packaging Company, LLC, based in Neenah, Wisconsin, is a subsidiary of Menasha Corporation, and it has more than 2,300 employees at locations nationwide. Menasha Packaging is a leading provider of graphic consumer packaging, merchandising solutions, corrugated packaging, food packaging, shipping containers and material handling solutions, and is home of the Retail Integration Group. With design, sales service centers, corrugated and paperboard plants located throughout the United States, the company’s mission is to help its customers protect, move and promote their products better than anyone else.

About Menasha Corporation
Menasha Corporation is a packaging, logistics and marketing services company based in Neenah, Wisconsin. Established in 1849, it is one of America’s oldest privately held manufacturing companies and specializes in corrugated packaging and high-quality point-of-purchase displays, plastic reusable packaging and in-store consumer promotion. The company has more than 3,400 employees in facilities across the globe.

About POPAI
POPAI is an international trade association for the marketing at‐retail industry. Founded in 1936, POPAI has more than 1,700 member companies representing Fortune 500 brand manufacturers and retailers, as well as marketing at‐retail producer companies and advertising agencies from six continents and more than 45 countries from around the world.

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CPGs and retailers to speak on sustainability and packaging






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Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/14/2013 8:57:31 AM





Packaging Optimization Summit 2013Industry thought-leaders will identify the critical issues and present best practice solutions to optimize packaging across the supply chain at the Packaging Optimization Summit, presented by PAC NEXT. The event will take place on May 15, 2013, at the Toronto Congress Centre during the PackEx Toronto show, May 14-16. [Editor’s disclaimer: PackEx Toronto is organized by UBM Canon, owner of Packaging Digest.]

 

The Summit is being hosted by North American retail and consumer packaged goods leaders collaborating on advancing sustainability and packaging. More than 800 executives and managers are expected to participate in this collaborative, interactive and fun event.

 

Speakers include:
• The Beer Store: Ted Moroz, president, The Beer Store and Brewers Distributor Ltd.
• Canadian Tire: Joanne McMillin, assistant vp, Business Sustainability
• Coca Cola Refreshments: Bruce Karas, vp, Environment & Sustainability
• Costco: Luc Lortie, Sustainability and Environmental Director
• Kraft: Gavinder Bhatia, Associate Director, Procurement
• Loblaw: Sonya Fiorini, Sr. Director, Corporate Social Responsibility
• Molson Coors: Bruce Smith, Senior Director, Global Packaging Innovation
• Mondelez: Karimah Hudda, Sustainability Manager
• Nestle: Catherine O’Brien, vp Communications
• Procter & Gamble (P&G): Len Sauers, vp, Global Sustainability
• Sobeys: David Smith, vp Sustainability
• Target: Kim Rapagna, CSR and Sustainability Leader
• Unilever: John Coyne, vp, Legal & External Affairs and General Counsel
• Walmart Canada: Chris West, vp, Canada Sourcing
• Master of Ceremonies: Anthony Watanabe, CEO/Founder, Innovolve Group

 

General admission is $100. PAC NEXT members will only be charged $50 and the cost is $75 for PAC members. The cost includes admission to the Summit, PACKEX Toronto (May 14-16), and the PAC Next Sustainability Village; as well as lunch and a networking reception.

 

To view an important video message about this event, click here.

To register for the event, click here.

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Menasha Packaging to Showcase Expanded Capabilities at GlobalShop 2013

Menasha Packaging will reveal its expanded capabilities and retail prowess at booth 1111 during GlobalShop 2013 from April 16 to 18 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Ill. Menasha’s team of promotional intelligence operatives help attendees extract the right promotional solutions that deliver increased product sales.

For more than 160 years, Menasha’s mission has been to help its clients move and sell more product. The recent acquisition of Rand Diversified—now Menasha Rand Group—broadens Menasha’s market penetration and increases its offerings in the areas of contract packaging and fulfillment for over-the-counter pharmaceutical and consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies.

With its enhanced network of operations, services and co-pack solutions, the promotional experts of Menasha hope tradeshow attendees will make it their mission to discover Menasha’s full capabilities.

“It’s no secret that Menasha is a leader in creating promotional solutions that increase ROI, grab attention, strengthen the brand and increase trial,” says Dennis Bonn, vice president of marketing for Menasha Packaging. “During GlobalShop, our agents will spotlight how in-store promotions can work harder through the application of Menasha’s inside knowledge, resources and innovation—giving you the advantage at retail. And in all your future missions.”

GlobalShop is the world’s largest annual trade show and conference dedicated to store design, visual merchandising and shopper marketing. GlobalShop informants (i.e. attendees) are invited to drop in to booth 1111 from 3-5 p.m. on Tuesday, April 16 to discover special agent “Menasha-Rita.”

About Menasha Packaging
Menasha Packaging Company, LLC, based in Neenah, Wisconsin, is a subsidiary of Menasha Corporation, and it has more than 2,300 employees at locations nationwide. Menasha Packaging is a leading provider of graphic consumer packaging, merchandising solutions, corrugated packaging, food packaging, shipping containers and material handling solutions, and is home of the Retail Integration Group. With design, sales service centers, corrugated and paperboard plants located throughout the United States, the company’s mission is to help its customers protect, move and promote their products better than anyone else. Visit its website at www.menashapackaging.com.

About Menasha Corporation
Menasha Corporation is a packaging, logistics and marketing services company based in Neenah, Wisconsin. Established in 1849, it is one of America’s oldest privately held manufacturing companies and specializes in corrugated packaging and high-quality point-of-purchase displays, plastic reusable packaging and in-store consumer promotion. The company has more than 3,400 employees in facilities across the globe. Visit its website at www.menasha.com.

About GlobalShop
Connecting the retail design industry every year since 1993, GlobalShop features an enormous expo floor filled with innovations for visual merchandising in retail, shopper marketing trends and the newest products for store design. Hundreds of the industry’s top suppliers pack the exhibition hall to display their latest products and services. GlobalShop brings the retail design community together under one roof, providing attendees and exhibitors with business opportunities to build successful brands. It is the largest annual sourcing opportunity for store design and visual merchandising projects—by far. Visit its website at www.globalshop.org.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Who is willing to fork out more for fresh and sustainable packaging?






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/8/2013 10:57:55 AM





 

Fresh foods (Microsoft)When it comes to food and beverage packaging, consumers are most likely to pay more for value-added features that relate to freshness and sustainability. This is the latest finding from a global study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

Consumers from around the world were given a list of potential packaging features and asked which ones they would be willing to pay more for. On a global basis, consumers were most likely to say they would pay more for “Packaging that keeps food fresh longer” (55 percent) and “Packaging that is environmentally-friendly” (55 percent).

 

Following freshness and environmental benefits, consumers said they were likely to pay more for packaging that is re-usable (42 percent) and easier to use (39 percent). Interestingly, more sophisticated packaging features were less likely to motivate consumers to spend more: packaging that prevents mess or spills, keeps food and beverages at the right temperature, and makes it easier to eat and drink on-the-go ranked lowest (34 percent, 33 percent and 31 percent, respectively).

 

“Packaging plays a key role in consumer packaged goods innovation, whether marketers are introducing new products or trying to invigorate existing brands” ,” says Lauren Demar, global CEO, Ipsos InnoQuest. “As a key driver in the consumer’s decision to buy, packaging features can often be leveraged to charge a premium. Our latest findings indicate that consumers place the most value on packaging that preserves freshness and offers environmental benefits. For marketers, there may be an opportunity to win over consumers and increase revenues through innovative package designs that deliver sustainability of freshness as well as sustainability of the planet.”

 

The survey also revealed that certain countries were more likely to say they would pay more for fresh and sustainable packaging:

 

South Africa, Malaysia and India were most likely to say they would pay more for packaging that keeps food fresh longer.

Mexico, South Africa and Indonesia were most likely to say they would pay more for environmentally-friendly packing.

 

Complimentary access to the data in this report for each of the 26 countries is available upon request from Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

These are the findings from a study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest via Ipsos Global @dvisor, an online survey of citizens around the world. A total of 19,883 adults from 26 countries were polled between Aug. 7 and 21, 2012. The countries included Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.

 

Source: Ipsos InnoQuest

 

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