PMMI Unveils New Logo, Officially Drops Old Name

“Leading companies, leading solutions.” “Total systems solutions.” “Made in the USA.” PMMI has been each of these things at any given point in its history. Now, in 2013, PMMI is “The Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies,” the largest association serving the processing and packaging supply chain.

The new descriptor and logo, both released today, reflect the evolution of PMMI. And, in the largest departure from tradition, PMMI has discontinued using “the Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute” publicly.

“PMMI has had a long, distinguished history as Packaging Machinery Manufacturers Institute, but that name doesn’t reflect who we are today,” says Charles D. Yuska, president & CEO, PMMI. “We’re PMMI, and we are The Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies.”

The new logo modernizes the familiar PMMI “shield” and lettering, incorporating PMMI’s history while embracing the present and future of the association and the industries it serves.

“In 1933, PMMI only represented packaging machinery manufacturers. Today, we’re a resource for the entire packaging and processing supply chain. The shift has come over time, as we have addressed our members’ and their customers’ needs. We’ve communicated that point in our strategic vision. Now our logo and descriptor line reflect it too,” Yuska says.

PMMI’s strategic vision statement supports the comprehensive nature of the PACK EXPO shows and the demands of PMMI members’ markets, stating, “PMMI convenes packagers, processors, and their supply chain partners to facilitate innovation, foster connections, and develop business opportunities.”

“The PACK EXPO shows and the PMMI membership have expanded dramatically in the last 10 years,” Yuska says. “Since 2006, we’ve added supplier, materials and containers, and processing membership classes, expanded membership to Mexico, and brought processing suppliers to the PACK EXPO exhibitor base. We’re convening the industry — bringing the processing and packaging supply chain together — on every front.”

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Food-grade rPET resin






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/25/2013 10:11:43 AM





Phoenix LNOLNO w resin, a new food-grade, melt-extruded rPET pellet with good color and cost attributes and is applicable for blow molded and thermoformed applications including water, cold-filled beverages, deli trays, fruit tubs and other end uses. LNOTM w resin is ideal for packages which aren’t subjected to heat (either in the filling process or during consumer usage) or need the rigorous performance attributes required by certain food applications. It can be used at levels up to 100 percent, or blended with virgin PET.

Additionally, the resin is ideally suited for personal care packaging applications which can benefit from food-grade rPET attributes which align with corporate philosophy and marketing objectives. LNO w is said to be 5- to 8-percent less expensive than Phoenix’s rPET grades used for containers that are subjected to thermal situations.

 

Phoenix Technologies

 

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LiquiGlide gives foods the slip to reduce waste






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This intriguing technology developed at MIT provides a slippery coating for containers
to improve efficiency and reduce food waste.


Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/26/2013 9:53:54 AM





 

Liquiglide drawingLiquiGlide can be engineered to control the speed that the object, liquid or material slide over the surface by changing the materials or structure of the coating.Who hasn’t lamented at those last portions of mayo clinging to the interior of a jar or a Heinz 57 sauce that’s so thick it becomes increasingly difficult to dispense the flavorful condiment as the volume dwindles with use? 

So tantalizingly close, yet frustratingly inaccessible…for now.
Some product waste that has been previously thought of as unavoidable may not be so elusive with LiquiGlide, a technology developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by five students and professor Kripa Varanasi. 

Developed in the Varanasi Research Group at MIT, the coating is made from nontoxic materials and is easily applied to food packaging. 

Industry Intel reported in mid-2012 that MIT’s “LiquiGlide coating is so slippery it allows all condiments to pour from the bottle. When applied to the inside of a bottle, the walls are so lubricated that sauces that would have normally stuck to the insides almost fall out. 

“The team estimates, that with this innovation, they would be able to make a dent on the estimated 1 million pounds of global food waste thrown out each year. In addition, they would eliminate the need for large squeeze-bottle caps, saving about 25,000 tons of petroleum-based plastics annually. 

According to MIT PhD candidate Dave Smith, LiquiGlide is almost like a structured liquid, because it is both rigid like a solid, yet lubricated like a liquid.” 

A composite of solid and liquid

What is LiquiGlide? Here’s the official description: “Liquid-impregnated surfaces are a patent-pending, super-slippery surface technology that comprise a composite of solid and liquid materials, where the solid holds the liquid tightly at the surface and the liquid provides the lubricity.”

Reportedly the initial application was aimed at coating car windshields, but it works equally well on many surfaces from airplane wings to containers made of glass, plastic, metal and ceramic, which covers a lot of ground in packaging for foods and other products.

The LiquiGlide website also offers this: “Application-specific custom formulations of the coating are created, so for food packaging, the coating is made from FDA-approved, edible materials.”

Interestingly, the coating can be engineered to control the speed that the object, liquid or material slide over the surface by changing the materials or structure of the coating. Thus, LiquiGlide can be tailored for the container type as well as for the product the customer wants to have slide more easily out of the container. 

It is so uniquely utilitarian that LiquiGlide has deservedly garnered a case load of high-profile accolades, including in late 2012 when it was recognized by Time magazine as one (of 26) of the Best inventions of 2012. Forbes also named it one of the best food inventions of 2012.

We reached out to the MIT LiquiGlide contacts a number of times by phone and email, but were unable to gain feedback for an update at press time. 

However, we did uncover a technical paper published in February 2013 in the technical publication Soft Matter (2013, 9, 1772) from RSC Publishing entitled “Droplet mobility on lubricant-impregnated surfaces,” which credits half of the same team members cited in the LiquiGlide literature including lead Varanasi. 

In the introduction, it provides background on a method-and the difficulty-of entrapping air pockets in a structured surface to enhance the sliding properties of materials. The paper offers a solution that involves “surfaces containing pockets of a lubricating liquid rather than of air. Stabilized by the capillary forces arising from the microscopic texture, the lubricant lets the droplet above it move with remarkable ease.” It also is stated that such non-wetting surfaces can provide self-cleaning properties.

These details simply underscore the fact that LiquiGlide is a slick development.

Apart from consumers’ ongoing frustration at not getting those last dabs of condiments from containers, the buzz for this out-of-the-box (bottle?) development could not have come at a more opportune time when the food industry is taking an ever closer look to reducing waste. 

At year’s end, one national consumer research organization, the Values Institute at DGWB singled out Food Waste Consciousness as one of its top five health trends predicted for 2013. 

Deep in the supply chain

And just last month, a new global campaign to cut food waste was launched by the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and partners: The Think.Eat.Save. Reduce Your Foodprint campaign, which is in support of the SAVE FOOD Initiative to reduce food loss and waste along the entire chain of food production and consumption. 

It’s at that last portion of the supply chain where the value-add of processing, packaging and transportation magnifies the cost of waste versus losses farther upstream, opening up food for thought for an option like LiquiGlide.

If this wonder coating has a sticking point, it may be cost: According to Time, the estimated cost per container for LiquiGlide is 25 cents, which puts it out of the reach of most packaged foods. 

However, as development continues across the many platforms it is applicable for, including non-packaging, costs will likely become more reasonable if not practical. It is conceivable this technology may be sliding into our futures faster than we think.

 

Industry Intel, 310-553-0008
www.industryintel.com

LiquiGlide, sales@liqui-glide.com
www.liqui-glide.com

Values Institute at DGWB, 714-881-2300
www.thevaluesinstitute.org







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The Packaging Conference in brief






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Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/13/2013 6:09:20 PM





 

TPC square logoThe Packaging Conference in Atlanta February 4-6 attracted 28 exhibitors and more than 230 attendees that included me. The three-day run was characterized by stimulating presentations and several energetic speakers and content that centered on technology developments and trends, especially those that related to sustainability. And an added dose of a marketing and package design inputs complemented by Big Picture views of economic/energy-related trends to round out the coverage.

 

Several highlights among many that caught my attention:

ZipBox, a joint development of Zip-Pak and T.H.E.M., revealed that it is looking at new liner materials and a plastic box. It is also developing with ITW Hartness a 100+ containers per minute packaging machine to meet end user requirements for higher output packaging. Introduced at Pack Expo Las Vegas 2011, the hybrid format combines the resealability of Zip-Pak technology with the basic utility of a carton.

 

A new film qualification process from Mondelez (Kraft) cuts the development and turnaround time from 6-12 months to 3-5 weeks using methodology that identifies and isolates failures and applies and scales globally.

 

Richard Blanchard, Diageo director packaging technology, noted that the company’s relative spend on packaging is 75% glass and just 7% PET with the balance other materials while providing a frank assessment of these two packaging formats the premium spirits producer relies on.

 

Blanchard solicited in rhetorical fashion the desire for a truly rigid, premium-feel clear polymer bottle that is the same weight as conventional PET bottles and at the same economics as glass. Any takers? 

Also, the company is looking to reduce the weight of its glass bottles by 15-20%.


The Absolut truth


There was an interesting presentation on the Absolut Unique bottles by Fredrik Kallqvist of the Ardagh Group that augmented information found in Packaging Digest‘s January 2013 cover story on this amazing development. Some points he made:

The Absolut Unique campaign could have made 94 quintillion different combinations; the bottles are recyclable because the organic coatings and inks burn off; per-bottle costs were only a little more than a sleeve label. In responses to questions, he also noted that while the Absolut Unique process produced very beautiful bottles and also some ugly ones, they did not segregate any less-than-appealing designs that resulted from the controlled random process simply because “beauty is in the eye of the beholder.”

 

I couldn’t agree more, though I also believe consumers will by default make that decision as it relates to any bottles left on shelf.

They did also not set aside any special bottles such as number 1 or 1,000,000 or any other one.

The Unique bottle is a nearly impossible act for Ardagh and Absolut to follow and it was stated that Absolut does not repeat a campaign, so the Absolut Exposure program launched in January that reportedly uses the groundbreaking technique of using photography in bottle printing.

 

Purac cupsHigh-heat and performance PLA homopolymers

 

As one example of the strong sustainable component to the event, Francois de Bie, marketing director of Purac, The Netherlands, disclosed the company’s work in developing in high-value polylactic acid (PLA) homopolymers, PDLA, that exhibit crystallization that increases the polymer’s heat-resistance (to 100 deg C) and other properties (see photo at left). These include versions of PLA that are microwavable and dishwasher safe for applications from consumer goods to utensils to food packaging.

One Purac innovation was for PLA foam pellets as an alternative to EPS (expanded polystyrene) pellets while another, for high-heat PLA films (around 225 deg C), is under development.

 

These examples just scratch the surface of an event that provided insightful content across the supply chain from converting through distribution.

 







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The Right Containers For Your Tomatoes

The Right Containers For Your Tomatoes

Making use of containers as you plant your favorite fruit? Don’t you know that though we often neglect it, there are containers that would give off better results than the others? Little did you know but the container you use for your plant affects the growing of your plant. Containers are very useful to our growing of homegrown tomatoes. When you do indoor planting, the container holds your plant in a more compact state. An addition to this is that your plant becomes much easier to handle since they have become mobile and easier to transfer from one place to another. You might think that as long as the container can carry soil, you are already set for planting tomatoes in containers. But actually that’s not all there is to know. The kind or the type, the quality, the size and the color are the factors you should think about. The type of planting technique should at one hand be another consideration.

For indoor planting, it is best to use the fiberglass or plastic pots. These containers are the ones that I would recommend you because of reasons that would benefit both you and your plant. There are basically two major explanations why this has been the popular choice. The first major reason is for economical purposes. These pots are larger than the others and can carry larger tomato plants. They have larger spaces and your plant’s roots can fully develop in this larger area. The second reason is that the soil in which the tomatoes are planted should remain moist. Plastic and fiberglass pots will keep your plants from drying up even if you expose your tomatoes to the heat they badly needed.

If you are doing hydroponics, the container you can use can either be a cement trough, a glass jar, an earthenware crock, a fiberglass tank or a container made of metal. Those that are made up of metal and concrete should be painted with asphalt emulsion before use. Painting it from the inside shall avoid the toxicity in your plants. For glass containers, you are to consider the opposite side. You need to paint the outer portion with dark color to avoid chemical change as the sunlight hits your container. Another reason why it should be painted with black is that the dark color prevents the possible growth of algae caused by the sun. However, when you do hydroponics, the fiberglass is the best option for a container.

The very thing you need to consider when you grow your tomatoes with the help of containers is that no matter how huge or small your containers are, it should be able to carry the weight of your plant. Often do we neglect it but it is true that the container matters. It is important that you use that which fits your tomato variety and the kind of planting technique that you would like to put into practice. Little may containers be, but they have big contributions on growing the juiciest and tastiest homegrown bests.

Paul Dale is the author of “Tomato Growing Secrets”. For more great information on growing tomatoes in containers go to our website. The website contains valuable information on anything related to growing your own tomatoes.


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Dual-Dispensing Packaging Technology

Dual-Dispensing Packaging Technology

Dual packages can deliver low-cost products while preserving the activity and effectiveness of the individual components. For these products, the incompatibility of the component ingredients dictates that the components remain separate until the moment of use.

There are several categories of dual-chambered packaging technology:

1) Dual compartments

2) Dual tubes

3) Dual chambers with unique discharge orifices

The technologies associated with these types of dual containers can be adapted or customized for dispensing products of different viscosities, from thick pastes to aqueous solutions.

The principle difference between these various types of dual dispensers is the manner in which the twin components are mixed. Generally, the components are transported and then mixed as used on a brush, in a cup, in the hand, etc. Sometimes the mixing can be in a third chamber which is part of the transporting package.

Dual containers can be fabricated from plastic, glass, or metal. Dual-dispensing technologies also offer varying degrees of precision in dose-to-dose delivery and mix ratio of the components. For some products, the need for clean dispensing cut-off must be considered. A clean cut-off will prevent cross contamination of the two components at the exit orifice.

Two critical factors control the advance of dual-packaged products in the marketplace. The first is packaging costs. In general, dual products cannot compete on shelf price. Shelf price is a function of manufacturing, material, and other costs. The cost of the dual compartmented package is increased due to the complexity of the package as compared to two separate containers of the incompatible components or a single container with an admixture of the two components.

Manufacturing costs are also greater for dual packaged products since dual containers are essentially packaged twice. Two completed packages must be provided, filled, closed, and sealed, for each shelf unit produced. Manufacturing costs of dual packaging are also increased by the complexity of the production operation.

The second factor that can drive dual packages from the market is reformulation. A manufacturer can devise a formulation or process that “compatibilizes” the incompatible components, obviating the need for the two compartmented package.

Guideline anticipates that new products with roots in the pharmaceutical, healthcare, and personal care areas will adapt dual packaging to products with a specific and unique requirement for dual-chambered technology. These market introductions will provide the user with a superior product and the manufacturer with a new means of supplying this product. The next several years should see movement in the usage of this technology.

The dual-compartmented package is just starting a cycle that will take some time to bring to fruition – time for consumers to perceive benefits afforded by the duality of the packaging unit, time to test the products, and time to review results. If a result can be obtained by a less expensive or higher performance alternative, then the dual-packaged product will fail in the marketplace.

This is the executive summary of an annual strategic report on dual-dispensing packaging technology written by Guideline staff and experts. For more information please visit us at www.intota.com.


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Reduced Moves of Stackable Containers Achieved Through Returnable Packaging Leader Container Exchanger

Reduced Moves of Stackable Containers Achieved Through Returnable Packaging Leader Container Exchanger

Container Exchanger is an online marketplace that offers manufacturing and distribution businesses an outlet for procuring or selling used returnable packaging. The product offerings include many standard and common reusable packaging solutions, including but not limited to plastic totes, plastic collapsible bulk boxes, metal containers, wire baskets, and plastic pallets. Launched in 2005, ContainerExchanger.com has empowered companies to reduce packaging acquisition costs through access to used returnable packaging inventories and it has enabled companies to maximize return during disposal of their used packaging fleets.

 

Returnable packaging reduces waste created by every business, including material handling.  According to David Madden, President of Container Exchanger recently reported that, “Returnable packaging improves material handling by reducing the number of moves from stackable containers. This type of lean manufacturing and distribution metric is quantifiable and makes this environmentally sound decision a good business choice as well.”

 

 

The EarthWorks Group estimates that 30% of landfill waste is created by plastic and paper packaging. The use of cardboard products and other one-time-use packaging products contribute to this waste. The per piece packaging costs for used bulk containers and totes can be as low as 5% of the costs for a comparable expendable solution, depending on shipping volumes.  

Folding bulk containers, industrial totes, and metal storage bins are used over and over again within a facility or between a supplier and a customer. They can be used literally thousands of times. These bulk boxes are much cheaper in the long term when compared to buying cardboard boxes and wood crates every time that product is shipped. Savings can be observed in the per piece packaging cost. While the upfront investment in returnable packaging may cost more, savings can be realized quickly through repeated use (the same bulk containers, metal bins, and totes are used over and over), labor (no more box assembly), material handling (fewer moves from stackable containers), quality (fewer rejects due to damaged packaging), and floor space (plastic and metal containers can stack very high).

Container Exchanger (www.containerexchanger.com) is dedicated to the sale and resale of reusable packaging and containers. The firm resells folding bulk containers, metal storage bins, plastic industrial totes, plastic pallets, and used gaylord boxes nationwide. When a company is finished using a returnable packaging fleet, Container Exchanger represents the seller and finds a buyer for the used bulk packaging. Sellers enjoy a high sales price for a better return on investment. Buyers save significantly in comparison to new packaging prices.

 

 

Container Exchanger

www.containerexchanger.com

David Madden, President

pr@containerexchanger.com

404-551-5599

 

Professional Marketing Firm for the Manufacturing Community and Manufacturing Journalist to most manufacturing magazines


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Efficient Packaging Floor Space Achieved Through Used Bulk Containers

Efficient Packaging Floor Space Achieved Through Used Bulk Containers

Container Exchanger is an online marketplace that offers manufacturing and distribution businesses an outlet for procuring or selling used returnable packaging. The product offerings include many standard and common reusable packaging solutions, including but not limited to plastic totes, plastic collapsible bulk boxes, metal containers, wire baskets, and plastic pallets. Launched in 2005, ContainerExchanger.com has empowered companies to reduce packaging acquisition costs through access to used returnable packaging inventories and it has enabled companies to maximize return during disposal of their used packaging fleets.

David Madden, President of Container Exchanger, recently reported that, “Returnable packaging improves utilization of floor space because plastic and metal containers can be stacked very high, unlike one-time cardboard options.  This efficiency provides an important lean manufacturing and distribution metric that is highly quantifiable and makes this environmentally sound decision a good business choice as well.”

Returnable packaging reduces waste created by every business. The EarthWorks Group estimates that 30% of landfill waste is created by plastic and paper packaging. The use of cardboard products and other one-time-use packaging products contribute to this waste. The per piece packaging costs for used bulk containers and totes can be as low as 5% of the costs for a comparable expendable solution, depending on shipping volumes.  

Folding bulk containers, industrial totes, and metal storage bins are used over and over again within a facility or between a supplier and a customer. They can be used literally thousands of times. These bulk boxes are much cheaper in the long term when compared to buying cardboard boxes and wood crates every time that product is shipped. Savings can be observed in the per piece packaging cost. While the upfront investment in returnable packaging may cost more, savings can be realized quickly through repeated use (the same bulk containers, metal bins, and totes are used over and over), labor (no more box assembly), material handling (fewer moves from stackable containers), quality (fewer rejects due to damaged packaging), and floor space (plastic and metal containers can stack very high).

Container Exchanger (www.containerexchanger.com) is dedicated to the sale and resale of reusable packaging and containers. The firm resells folding bulk containers, metal storage bins, plastic industrial totes, plastic pallets, and used gaylord boxes nationwide. When a company is finished using a returnable packaging fleet, Container Exchanger represents the seller and finds a buyer for the used bulk packaging. Sellers enjoy a high sales price for a better return on investment. Buyers save significantly in comparison to new packaging prices.

Container Exchanger

www.containerexchanger.com

David Madden, President

pr@containerexchanger.com

404-551-5599

Professional Marketing Firm for the Manufacturing Community and Manufacturing Journalist to most manufacturing magazines


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Plastic Versus Poly: Polywood Rocker Polywood Outdoor Furniture

Plastic Versus Poly: Polywood Rocker Polywood Outdoor Furniture

Plastic versus Poly don’t know the difference, well keep reading. Plastic outdoor patio furniture that so many of us are accustomed to seeing at the local home improvement store or even at the local super market is lightweight, goes swimming every time the wind blows and is easily broken. You will find plastic outdoor furniture only available in white or green that I have seen. Did I mention that quite often it needs to be replaced every year due to the chalky film that develops after a couple of months in the hot sun?

Poly outdoor furniture, on the other hand, is a High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) plastic which is made from recycled milk jugs, bottles and containers. The HDPE plastic is then formed into typical wood profiles that will later be cut, drilled and screwed into sustainable outdoor furniture, decking, and a variety of commercial uses that are built to last a lifetime. Poly outdoor furniture is weighty and will withstand the north wind blowing as the lightest adirondack chair is weighing in at about forty pounds.

There are now several poly lumber furniture manufacturers taking the outdoor patio furniture market by storm. The company on the leading edge is Poly-Wood outdoor furniture which is a name brand for recycled poly lumber furniture. PolyWood outdoor furniture may cost you more initially however is a far wiser investment when you consider the longevity of the outdoor furniture and the virtually maintenance free qualities. Poly-Wood outdoor furniture is backed by a manufacturer’s warranty which promises that it will not rust, split or splinter. PolyWood outdoor furniture uses commercial grade stainless steel with an additional “Xylan” protective and cosmetic coating. All these features intentionally planned to create sustainable outdoor furniture built to last a lifetime.

Poly-Wood outdoor furniture is available in a wide variety of styles to complement any outdoor environment. You will find the classic Adirondack chair in several styles and a minimum of six traditional colors and six bright, vivid colors. Also, you can find Traditional Benches, Rockers, Gliders, Dining and Bistro Tables, Dining Chairs and Bistro Chairs and Swings all made out of sustainable PolyWood outdoor furniture.

In the end you need to decide whether you are interested in sustainable PolyWood outdoor furniture for a lifetime of enjoyment that will withstand high winds and blazing sun. Or you can go with lightweight plastic furniture that will blow in the breeze, chalk and crack after a few years of use and then be tossed aside to further fill our overflowing landfills.

Amir is a sr. editor to the website http://www.poly-lumber-furniture.com/ is an Miami Springs Florida (US) based provide affordable Poly Lumber Furniture was designed to be virtually indestructible – it won’t crack, splinter, peel or rot and will stand up to the harshest environments.


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Wholesale Plastic Containers – A Must For Restaurant Owners

Wholesale Plastic Containers – A Must For Restaurant Owners

As a restaurant proprietor, it’s crucial for you to store your establishment with all the appliance required to assemble both your workforce jobs and your customers’ dining experiences as easy and pleasant as viable. Wholesale plastic containers are included in the list of essential equipment. Because you can display and stock your product in these containers, they assist to keep your restaurant organized and sanitary as well as aid your cooks and waiters staff execute their tasks efficiently.

Below are a few of the virtual everyday places in your restaurant where you can – and should – use wholesale plastic accessories.

Whether it’s a junk food joint or an elegant formation, your restaurant needs plastic pots in its kitchen. A restaurant’s food grade containers can:

Store elements when your cook isn’t asking them.
Devise ingredients when your cook is making foods.
Hold nutrients that your cook has already prepared and is available to serve.
You can likewise use big square plastic containers in your restaurant’s kitchen to hold your cook’s shafts when they’re not in use, such as tongs, spatulas, and ladles. If you project to use these containers to stock food, get sure you select food grade dispensers with lids. Likewise, if you consider your group will need to transfer these containers often, select dispensers with handgrips for convenience.

During business minutes, you will probably have a drag or two set up along the sidelines where your wait staff can well access any additional products your customers might need during their meals. Such particulars might include extra silverware sets, table napkins, straws, or condiments. Wholesale plastic containers work better to organize these items so your servers and waitresses can easily find and remember them for your customers.

These accessories are influential for managing cleansing provisions such as counter, floor, and window dry cleaners, as well as sheets, extra mop heads, and extra spray bottles. You might also want to use these pots to stock toilet items like paper towels, soap, and toilet paper. You can also use these pots to manage and store customer items, like all the extra utensils, table napkins, stalks, and condiments your wait staff holds handy during business hours.

If you produced your product display applying plastic pots on your countertop, make certain that nothing stands between your customers and the pots. This takes on any floor racks you might have nearly your countertop as well as incremental display fixtures on the countertop. If you created your product display using plastic pots set on a tie display stand for your floor, make sure the rack is situated so that your customers can easily pass around to view each side without relegating into other display fixtures or getting that one side is stuffed

hello guys,this is bruce.good news for you.do you really wanna buy something blue-chip without going abroad.do you really wanna buy something blue-chip only by using your first finger.just call me.wholesale plastic line you know where i am.good luck!


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