Zenify stress relief drink launches in first Rexam 12 oz. SLEEK® can with tactile printing

“Live Stress Free.” That’s the mantra of Zenify, the 100 percent natural stress relief drink. Looking for a truly distinctive package that would exemplify the look and feel of its brand, the company chose to launch in the first Rexam 12oz. SLEEK® can in the U.S. to utilize tactile printing technology.

Zenify is a clean and extremely refreshing stress relief drink.  It contains 25 times more stress-relieving antioxidants than green tea, but without the caffeine. The drink’s blend of natural antioxidants and amino acids has been clinically shown to increase alpha waves in the brain, elevate serotonin and dopamine levels and reduce stress without drowsiness. Zenify also includes 100 percent of the recommended dietary allowance of five B-Vitamins, which are designed to work synergistically in the beverage to reduce stress.

“80% of working Americans are chronically stressed. Our goal was to create the most effective and best-tasting stress relief drink on the market, one that you can drink throughout the day to clear your mind and stay focused,” said Adam Rosenfeld, founder and formulator of Zenify. “And we wanted a unique design that would be a differentiator. Working closely with Rexam, we created just that.”

“The tactile printing adds another dimension to the brand,” said Brian Liu, co-founder of Zenify. “In addition to taste, sight and smell, our product now has a distinct texture all its own. We’ve already received tremendous customer feedback on the new can.”

In addition to its exclusive tactile can design, Zenify benefits from the many inherent advantages of aluminum cans including portability, durability and sustainability. Aluminum cans are infinitely recyclable with cans able to be melted, converted to cans again and back on retail shelves within 60 days. In the last 15 years, the beverage can industry has reduced the overall carbon footprint of the aluminum can by more than 45 percent. These facts help make cans the most recycled beverage container in the world with a U.S. recycling rate of 65.1 percent, more than double the rate of other beverage packages.  

Rich Grimley, president and CEO, Rexam BCNA, commented on how Zenify’s unique packaging will benefit its brand and business. “Our 12oz. SLEEK can is already a great solution to help brands attract attention on store shelves. Utilizing our tactile printing technology takes it one step further, allowing the product to stand out even more, while benefiting from the inherent advantages of cans that include superior recycling, filling, distribution and retail display economics.”

In addition to reducing stress and tension, the company is committed to helping bridge divides. Zenify is the first corporate partner of The Coexist Foundation, donating five percent of its profits to the global non-profit organization focused on increasing understanding and reducing conflict throughout the world.

Zenify is currently available at select natural and specialty retailers in New York and California, with plans for continued expansion.

 

 

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Brazilian Packaging Association (ABRE) | 2013 o Prêmio ABRE da Embalagem Brasileira

 

Brazilian Packaging Association (ABRE) | 2013 o Prêmio ABRE da Embalagem Brasileira
www.abre.org.br
The Brazilian Packaging Award of the Brazilian Packaging Association (ABRE) created its awards program in 2001. Over its 10-plus years of existence, ABRE has awarded prizes to companies of all sizes showing that proper packaging is essential for all types of products from different categories, providing quality of life for people. Packages are critiqued for excellence in quality, technology, design, functionality, innovation and sustainability.

Gold—Savory Food Packaging
Atum Salera
Submitted by: Salera Alimentos
This package protects and showcases fish products for a small company that has limited financial and machinery resources. Brightly printed cartons have a cleverly placed window that lets consumers see the clear, glass jars of packaged fish inside. A stylishly retro graphic design delivers shelf appeal.

Gold—Alcoholic Beverages Packaging
Cachaça Gouveia Brasil
Submitted by: Verallia
Extra-clear glass and a complex design make this 700-mL bottle a stunner. The structural design uses two transverse planes that have an offset axis, yet the axis of the bottle as a whole remains aligned.

Gold—International Competitiveness: Food and Beverages Products for Export
Linha Brazilian Soul
Submitted by: Vinícola Aurora
The brand uses its Brazilian origins as a differentiator. The package elegantly expresses Brazilian culture with a hot-stamped design that features colors from the Brazilian flag. A small picture of the Brazilian flag on the labels’ front panels further attests to the wines’ origins. The resulting packages align with brand values, look great on shelves and are well received by customers.

Gold Winner—Packaging for a Family of Products
Linha de Maquiagem Phebo
Submitted by: Casa Granado
Hot-stamped silver is paired with transparent packaging to present a premium image that also showcases the cosmetics’ colors. To draw shoppers’ attention, the elegant primary packages are housed in bright coral-colored cartons.

Gold—Perfume Packaging
Perfumes Quem Disse, Berenice?
Submitted by: Wheaton Brasil
This perfume package puts the brand in consumers’ hands. The PP cap, which is fashioned to resemble the Quem Disse, Berenice? brand logo, makes the package a standout but is perfectly paired with the round glass bottle. Decorative silkscreen printing is used to differentiate scents, and three varieties feature hot-stamped gold lettering.

Gold—Promotional Packaging; Gold—Graphic Design: Non-alcoholic Beverages
Schweppes 230 Anos
Submitted by: Coca-Cola Brasil
Schweppes turned 230 years old this year. To celebrate, the brand released seven retro cans—one for each Schweppes flavor. Each design was dressed with a custom illustration that represents a different era during Schweppes’ history. A matte finish projects a premium image for the entire limited-edition collection.

Gold—Graphic Design: Sweets and Desserts
Latas Colecionáveis Talento
Submitted by: FutureBrand
These gift tins express the spirit of Brazil with colorful illustrations that celebrate the plurality of a village of colonial houses, the joy of Carnival, urban street art, the country’s varied cultures and people, and the daily optimism of Brazilians.

Gold—Graphic Design: General Products
Green by Missako
Submitted by: Green by Missako
The challenge was to project the free spirit of the brand within the whimsical world of children. Cheerful illustrations bring in elements of fun while uncluttered lines and vibrant colors deliver shelf impact.

Gold—Marketing: Communication Strategy
Encontre sua Coca-Cola Zero
Submitted by: Coca-Cola Brasil
Coca-Cola Brasil courts 20-something year old consumers, with this customized packaging campaign. It printed 150 of the most common names in Brazil on Coca-Cola Zero cans. The limited-edition offering helped consumers identify with the Coca-Cola Zero brand and sparked conversations on social media.

Gold—Special: The Open Choice
Se Beber, Vá De Carona
Submitted by: Routhier & Darricarrère
The shipping case and wine label were designed side-by-side to tell the story of the Brazilian winery and its French origins. When Routhier & Darricarrère’s owners first arrived in Brazil, they bought a Volkswagen bus to tour the country’s beautiful beaches. The wine’s shipping case pays tribute to this memory by mimicking the van’s appearance. The novel design is balanced with a sophisticated color palette dominated by bright reds and clean whites. The theme and color scheme is carried over to the bottle decoration with red capsules and white labels.

Gold—Cosmetics and Personal Care Packaging; Gold—Sustainable Packaging
Sou
Submitted by: Natura
Sou’s easy-to-use package breaks category paradigms with a design that requires 70% less material to manufacture than conventional hair- and body-care packaging. The drop-shaped pouch also reduces product waste by enabling near-complete product evacuation.

Gold—Graphic Design: Cosmetics, Personal Care, Health and Pharmaceutical
Redesign Sempre Livre
Submitted by: Johnson & Johnson do Brasil
Sempre Livre’s updated look clearly communicates the product’s benefits with informative graphics on color-coded backgrounds with a lighthearted design. To ensure consistency across the color coding system, all colors had to be tested and validated, with some pigments requiring reformulation.

Gold—Special: The Consumer’s Choice
Fragrância Linda Lindinha de O Boticário
Submitted by: Grupo Boticário
Recognizing that girls often imitate the woman they find the greatest source of inspiration, love, joy, confidence and style—their mothers, the brand created this youthful fragrance. The fragrance’s bottle is painted with glitter to bring a sense of play, while the transparent, thick-walled plastic used for the overcap and the simple metal coating for the sprayer speak to this generation’s preference for minimalist design. The carton continues this simple-yet-playful design with relief and sparkling lamination.

Gold—Graphic Design: Savories
Liggero
Submitted by: Narita Design
The brand identity, name and package design lets consumers know that Liggero packaged pastas deliver fast-and-easy meal preparation with taste appeal. 

Gold—Nonalcoholic Beverages Packaging
Suco Casa Madeira
Submitted by: Verallia
Inspired by the jam jar that Casa Valduga, the makers of juice, already have in its lineup, this bottle highlights the nutritional benefits of the product. The bottle is shaped like the body of a thin, tall and healthy person. On the shoulders of the bottle sits the Casa Maderia Coat of Arms in high relief, which helps brand the product and presents a premium image.

Gold—Packaging for Micro- and Small-sized Companies
Linha Iandê—Aisó
Submitted by: SA2 Design e Comunicação
A one-color design keeps converting costs down for this double-duty package. The carton easily transforms to a point-of-purchase display, which encourages retailers to place this Brazilian brand alongside higher-priced imports.

Gold—Packaging in General
Vedapren Fast
Submitted by: Pande
A rectangular design allows the tubs to be nested for transport to a filling facility, and it provides strong brand differentiation because competing products are sold in round buckets. The shape makes the product easier for consumers to use because it accommodates paint rollers as well as brushes—eliminating the need to purchase trays.

Gold—Structural Design: Functionality
Embalagem para Implantes Dentários
Submitted by: Neodent
This single package accommodates a large range of implants, despite differences in geometry, lengths and diameter. Its design protects the product’s sterility and bio-safety while making the product easier for dentists to handle efficiently. The functionality comes from a vertical-and-horizontal lift system that works with a gripper device to safely move and place the implant.

Gold—International Competitiveness: General Products for Export
x-liso
Submitted by: Brazilian Secrets Hair
Sophisticated photography and a minimalist design aims to appeal to an international market while subtly reminding consumers that the products are made in Brazil.

Gold—Sweets and Desserts Packaging
Iorgurte Grego Batavo
Submitted by: BRF
This PP package for Greek-style yogurt is decorated with an in-mold label that helps differentiate the brand from a competitor offering similar products. The ergonomically shaped bottles help project a premium image, and an aluminum seal assures consumers of product safety. Spent packaging can be easily recycled because the primary structures and their labels are made from the same material.

Gold—Technological: Beverage Packaging
Rótulo Adesivado
Submitted by: Mazda Embalagens
A pre-glued label enables label application without a hot-melt gluer and makes the PET bottle fully recyclable because the label leaves no residue after removal.

Gold—Graphic Design: Redesign for Food and Beverages
Marilan—Pit Stop
Submitted by: M Design
To maintain its position as one of the category leaders in the cracker segment, Pit Stop needed to evolve its package communications with a new logo and overall design. The updated triangular logo has a shape evocative of a road sign to encourage shoppers to stop and look at the products. Bigger, bolder type over variety-specific shapes help shoppers identify and buy their favorite flavor from the 14-item product line.

Gold—Structural Design: Shape
PacXpert
Submitted by: Dow
This packaging structure was designed in the U.S. but has characteristics especially suitable for Brazil’s paint and food-service markets. It has a large capacity (3.6 to 18 L), enables almost complete product evacuation, a large-diameter nozzle for easy dispensing, top and bottom handles for precise application and easy handling, stability on shelf even when partially empty, and is made from materials that can be easily recycled.

Gold—Packaging: Food Service, Delivery and Carry Out
America Delivery—Embalagens
Submitted by: Dezign com Z
Food-service packaging helps unify the consumer experience from table to take-out, with messaging written from the perspective of a friendly waiter. The conversational branding also prompts a desire to taste delivered products even before the boxes and bags have been opened.

Gold—Technology: Food Packaging
Smart Cap
Submitted by: Revpack Tecnologia
The tottle’s closure is made with a cap-and-valve injection process that enables the automatic application of seals. The closure is also easy to recycle because only one resin was used for both the cap and valve.

Gold—Technology: Cosmetics, Personal Care, Health and Pharmaceutical
Frasco 1000 mL MAX VAC Embramed
Submitted by: Ab Plast
The 1000-mL PET-glycol bottle is designed as a lightweight replacement for the glass containers often used with medical suction pumps. The break-resistant bottle is blow molded with a 90 finish neck and very thick walls that prevent the package from collapsing during vacuum application. A strong sealing system holds the vacuum.

Gold—Graphic Design, Family of Products
Quem Disse, Berenice?
Submitted by: Matriz Escritório de Desenho
Grupo Boticário uses strong patterns, metallic inks and bright colors to bring a cheerful personality to its new makeup brand. The look for Quem Disse, Berenice? inspires and emotionally connects with consumers.

Gold—Graphic Design: Redesign for General Products
York
Submitted by: Matriz Escritório de Desenho
Celebrating its 60th anniversary, the York brand, from Hypermarcas, has an updated look that spans its entire product line. The new design modernizes the brand mark by
integrating the Y monogram with a cotton symbol. The York endorsements on all products, even those belonging to its sub-brands, were also made more prominent, which boosts the branding and marketing strength of the brand.

Gold—Technology: General Products
Bandeja para transporte de Placa de Circuito Impresso Sensível
Submitted by: Waco Thermoforming Solutions
This returnable package was designed to transport conductive materials. The package’s high-impact resistance prevents the containers from breaking.

Gold—Special: Student
Octa Cooler MMA
Submitted by: Douglas Cardoso do Espasso Silva at Oswaldo Cruz University
The package includes an inner container that transforms the box into a cooler that can be easily carried to game-watching parties and other social events.

To see this article as it appeared in the 2013 Annual Awards Issue in print, click here.

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Brandimage A Triple Winner In 2013 American Package Design Awards

Brandimage, a leading global consultancy of brand equity architects and designers who create brands that drive brand performance, announced that its Chicago office has been distinguished by GDUSA (Graphic Design USA) with three 2013 American Package Design Awards recognizing the value of design to advance the brand promise and forge an emotional connection with the consumer at the moment of truth.

For five decades, Graphic Design USA has sponsored national design competitions that spotlight areas of excellence and opportunity for creative professionals. Of these, the American Package Design Awards are the fastest growing. This year’s entries grew to over 1600 with only a selective one in six firms being recognized for their packaging design.

Package design is increasingly the differentiator in the consumer’s purchasing decision. Meaningful brands leverage intrinsic emotional and cultural cues to express what they are, what they stand for, and how they want to be perceived by others. When brands tell engaging stories consistently, people become brand champions. They put them on their list. They make them a part of their lives — compelling brand experience design should seduce shoppers at the point of decision.

Rob Swan, vice president, executive creative director of Brandimage’s Chicago office, said, “We really like winning GDUSA. It recognizes strong packaging as one of the ways we are shaping the culture around us, and that great design is constantly evolving just like it is. In this way, GDUSA represents a rich record of the design continuum. I’m proud that so much of our work continues to be a part of that.”

Swan added, “We are fortunate to collaborate with visionary clients who believe in the power of design to advance their brands and connect with consumers on a visceral level. It is through these partnerships that we’re able to create work that wins awards and wins in-store.”

In the Food and Beverage category, Brandimage was awarded Certificates of Excellence for:

Nature Valley, Brand Owner: General Mills

Total Cereal, Brand Owner: General Mills

Yoplait, Brand Owner: General Mills

To view all 2013 American Package Design Awards winners, click the following Web site address: http://www.gdusa.com/contests/apda13/index.php

Brandimage is a global consultancy of brand equity architects and designers. Brandimage creates brands that drive brand performance. Brandimage is part of the brand development group of SGK.

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Aliment Accentuation

Dean & DeLuca aims to get back to its roots with an in-house redesign project spanning the entire private label collection. “It was important for us to get everything redesigned and rebranded back to our core elements. Now, the customer can identify our products more easily on the shelf, and they standout as being our own and as having a consistent core brand style,” Jenny Burgett, graphic designer, brand identitiy and packaging, Dean & DeLuca, comments.

Utilizing the brand’s core colors of black, white, silver, PMS 877 for printed labels and PMS 432 gray: the redesign strives to keep packaging as white and light as possible. Taking a cue from the Neo-classical, minimalist look of the brand’s retail spaces. Glass bottles and jars are used throughout the collection to emphasize a natural look. For products the brand could not show, due to the nature of the packaging, such as the boxed baking mixes, photography was employed.

A clean sans serif typeface is consistent throughout the line, and denotes the product category; while a cursive font, based on the handwriting of one of the founders, Jack Ceglic, depicts the variety on pack. “We wanted to revert back to our own history and the value in that, so we decided to bring that font back into all of our packaging. It represents a strong part of our brand history,” Burgett explains.

A palette of secondary brand colors is used as a guide when choosing accent colors for products that need to be distinguished on shelf. For instance, the syrup and dipping oil collections, both featuring four flavor varieties, utilize the palette of secondary brand colors. However, for the brand’s 10 glass packaged salts, only the primary color palette was utilized, as the unique coloring and textures of the salts serve as an adequate differentiator on shelf.

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Snapshots: June/July 2013 Issue

Aliment Accentuation
Packaging that says, ‘It’s all about the food.’

Dean & DeLuca aims to get back to its roots with an in-house redesign project spanning the entire private label collection. “It was important for us to get everything redesigned and rebranded back to our core elements. Now, the customer can identify our products more easily on the shelf, and they standout as being our own and as having a consistent core brand style,” Jenny Burgett, graphic designer, brand identitiy and packaging, Dean & DeLuca, comments.

Utilizing the brand’s core colors of black, white, silver, PMS 877 for printed labels and PMS 432 gray: the redesign strives to keep packaging as white and light as possible. Taking a cue from the Neo-classical, minimalist look of the brand’s retail spaces. Glass bottles and jars are used throughout the collection to emphasize a natural look. For products the brand could not show, due to the nature of the packaging, such as the boxed baking mixes, photography was employed.

A clean sans serif typeface is consistent throughout the line, and denotes the product category; while a cursive font, based on the handwriting of one of the founders, Jack Ceglic, depicts the variety on pack. “We wanted to revert back to our own history and the value in that, so we decided to bring that font back into all of our packaging. It represents a strong part of our brand history,” Burgett explains.

A palette of secondary brand colors is used as a guide when choosing accent colors for products that need to be distinguished on shelf. For instance, the syrup and dipping oil collections, both featuring four flavor varieties, utilize the palette of secondary brand colors. However, for the brand’s 10 glass packaged salts, only the primary color palette was utilized, as the unique coloring and textures of the salts serve as an adequate differentiator on shelf.

 

Branded Luxury
Italian Alps channeled in artisan chocolate package design.

Nestled in the Italian alpine resort community of Breuil-Cervinia, a boutique hotel by the name of Principe Delle Nevi, or “Prince of Snow” beckons ski enthusiasts worldwide. Plan B Creative Team (www.planbproject.com), Tel-Aviv, Israel, took on the task of creating a sub-brand chocolate line for the hotel.

Dubbed “The Chocolate”, Plan B’s brief was to create a branded luxury packaging for the hotel’s unique handmade chocolates. “Our goal was to combine the new and the old. A mix between classic Italian design and clean and modern elements, reflecting the hotel’s branding and interior design.” explains Max Gat-mor, creative director and partner, Plan B.  The logo that appears on the packaging is a mix between a contemporary typeface and the brand name; an image of the “Matterhorn” mountain, the central view from the hotel, is the focal point and consistent throughout The Chocolate line. The chocolatier’s autograph appears on the sleeve and labeling, adding to the artisanal quality of the collection.

Hotel Principe Delle Nevi offers a selection of luxury chocolate pralines, housed in high-quality thick duplex paper. Israeli printing and packaging service supplier Ravgon collaborated with Plan B to conduct material research and testing until the current box was developed. For efficiency and budget consciousness, the custom chocolate box is printed entirely on a single sheet of paper, using only three Pantone colors. Hot stamping the Hotel Principe Delle Nevi’s crest onto the package further reinforces the high-end appeal.

Brushed aluminum bags, sourced through a large coffee packaging vendor evoke a contemporary look and feel. Digitally printed labels with a complementary color palette provide the brand with flexibility to add new colors as seasonal flavors are introduced into the line. The artisanal quality is further continued as a “freehand” font type was selected for the labels as a flavor descriptor.

 

Sweet Reunion
The Mike and Ike split is settled.

Mike and Ike, the infamous duo of the Just Born Inc. family settled their differences and reconvened, after taking a year to explore separate interests. The fruit-flavored candy brand was revitalized, with a complete packaging redesign, by BrandFirst (www.brandfirstnj.com). A redesign was in order, for the brand to be more relevant with the target consumer, ages 13-19.

“The creative brief outlined the need for three different design families: Fun & Energetic, Cool & Hip, and Futuristic & Trendy,” explains Donald Huston, Mike and Ike, brand manager. Huston comments on the redesign capabilities of BrandFirst: “Their design creativity, confirmed by extensive consumer testing, led us to a fantastic design that is new and fresh but still very much tied to the historical visual cornerstones of the brand.” On the logo, the word “and” is now situated on a vertical plane between Mike and Ike; dimension applied to the background generates the sense of motion.

“We introduced black as a mainstay color, to work across all of the flavors of the brand,” explains Amy Happ, BrandFirst, creative director. “That really gave it the edge that we were looking for, and with that we built on it with the futuristic background.” Gone are cartoony fruit illustrations; custom illustrations featuring photo realistic quality now grace Mike and Ike packs. The on-pack “bean” graphics were given a sleek redesign, now debossed and featuring a translucent appearance.

Mike and Ike’s color palette expanded with the redesign; transitioning from a spot-color printing process to a seven-color printing process. “Our suppliers are delivering on the expanded gamut printing process that we need to really deliver on the new eye catching design.” explains Huston.

 

Sensual Structure
Condom brand enters new territory.

Church & Dwight wanted to address a new market with its Trojan brand, so Trojan Lubricants was created. To develop a visual identity for the collection of three varieties of gender-neutral personal lubricants, Church & Dwight approached strategic partners, Product Ventures (productventures.com), for structural design and Colangelo (colangelo-sm.com), for graphic design and communication of the outer carton.

Product Ventures’ client director on the Trojan project, Sarah Palomba recaps the design firm’s goals, “The idea was that the package would be engaging, feature dynamic color, and appeal to both sexes through its alluring and captivating form,” The environment of use was yet another design element addressed, “Another key design goal for the product was understanding the environment of use and therefore we sought to make the package as easy-to-handle and intuitive to use as possible.” continues Palomba.

The PP cap is fully integrated into the curved PET bottle shape, assisting with the one-handed-operation design. A luxurious gold ink, bearing the Trojan logo is pad-printed on the front of the hourglass bottle, versus a lamination process, which could potentially get slick. The jewel-tone bottles evoke a premium feel via use of a pearlescent finish. Peter Clarke, CEO of Product Ventures reflects, “The branding on the bottle is minimal so that the structure becomes the primary visual. The form evokes a passionate embrace with the intertwining curves and undulating surfaces.”

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How Important is Consistent Clarity in a Thermoformed Package for Increased Sales?

According to Technomic, a food industry research and consulting firm, at the height of the economic downturn many consumers purchased retail prepared foods. But now as the economy recovers, some consumers are purchasing retail less often than they did just two years ago; in fact, 38% of today’s consumers say that they purchase prepared foods from traditional supermarkets each week—compared to 42% who said the same in 2010.

“These consumers may be reversing the patterns they set a couple of years ago by heading back to restaurants,” says Darren Tristano, vice president of Technomic. “For retailers to gain or maintain their share of foodservice dollars, they’ll need to clearly stand out from restaurants—especially since our data shows that consumers’ expectations are rising for the taste, quality, freshness and appearance of retailer prepared foods.”

In the food industry, the presentation of the food is just as important as the food itself.  Catching the consumer’s attention, especially in big stores can be difficult. A key differentiator between all of the food options available can be achieved by having a crystal clear package. As a result, numerous thermoformers are now realizing just with a simple switch to PET sheet for their packaging—they are able to increase sales.

One of the principal advantages of PET sheet is its optical clarity.  Packages made from PET sheet tend to show very little haziness compared to other available packaging materials.  Packaging made from PET sheet has even helped some thermoformers create an image of a “premium product” in a market or convenience store refrigerated case amongst their competitors. 

Yet, just by making the switch to PET, thermoformers have discovered they are not always able to produce a “truly” clear PET package every time. To resolve this industry wide issue, OCTAL developed a production process that has proven to successfully produce a consistently clear PET sheet.

“OCTAL’s propriety technology produces PET sheet directly from PET resin melt, resulting in a final product with significantly enhanced optical and mechanical properties. With direct-to-sheet PET product, DPET, OCTAL delivers the finest quality and most consistent PET sheet to enable thermoformers, brands and retail partners to realize unsurpassed reliability, consistently  higher yield, and packages with an unbeatable clear finish,” states William J. Barenberg, Jr., OCTAL’s chief operating officer.

OCTAL’s DPET provides increased gloss, no visual inclusions, finished parts without color variation, and with a high Intrinsic Viscosity (I.V.), unparalleled toughness.  DPET also requires up to five degrees less heat at standard draw ratios in the thermoforming process, which translates into less energy consumption and more savings for the customer.

“The OCTAL DPET process also brings the major advantage of a carbon footprint 25% below that of traditionally produced APET films.  The direct-to-sheet process eliminates the most energy-intensive and defect-prone processes to deliver a spotless sheet with a fraction of the energy,” stated William J. Barenberg, Jr., OCTAL’s chief operating officer.

Any thermoformer looking to attract and keep the consumers’ attention on the retail shelf through clearer package can simply make the switch to a PET sheet. However, before making any switch, it is best to test that PET sheet in a manufacturing environment to ensure that the consistent clarity promised from the supplier will be achieved.

Reference:  http://www.perishablenews.com/index.php?article=0027365

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5 top global packaging trends






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The top five packaging trend opportunities for 2013.


Jim Lucas is evp, Global Insights & Strategy, at Schawk Inc. — Packaging Digest, 5/6/2013 2:28:30 PM





Are you maximizing your packaging to BE RELEVANT AND VALUABLE for today’s consumers?
Jim Lucas, Contributing Writer

With the first quarter of 2013 behind us, where lies the greatest potential for packaging? These top shopper/consumer trends are not predictions, but rather opportunities for packaging in the remainder of 2013 and beyond. Each of these opportunities is based on providing consumers with something that is useful or valuable. With that in mind, we look at five areas with positive potential.

1. Sustainability
Sustainability continues to be an important theme for consumers globally-but with some twists.

Increasingly, consumers are holding companies (manufacturers and retailers alike) to a higher standard than themselves. While consumers have come to expect green characteristics as an important element of products, they are less willing to pay a premium for these elements. While shoppers tend to purchase green products, enthusiasm has waned somewhat, according to Mintel’s Attitudes toward Corporate Social Responsibility-U.S., published in Sept. 2012. Whether ingredients, packaging or process, “green” is not the stand-out differentiator it once was. It is important, but not as top-of-mind. It is becoming a greens fee in the marketplace.

As transparency rises, the expectation is that companies will be green. Consumers have become more skeptical and need help determining whether a product delivers on its claims (that is: proof).

An example of this is Method’s Ocean Plastic packaging. Method’s Ocean Plastic has both a good back story (the plastic is harvested by Method employees from ocean beaches) and provides proof (post-consumer recycled plastic creates a uniquely gray resin color).

Sustainable packaging plays an important role in beauty and personal care (BPC) products, too. While not a primary element of BPC products, half (49 percent) feel it is important to have products made from recycled materials, and 43 percent think it is important to recycle BPC packaging. Fresh handmade natural personal care and cosmetics manufacturer Lush, for example, claims that 70 percent of its products don’t have packaging, according to Mintel’s Personal Care Consumer-U.S. report, published in Sept. 2012. Lush promotes on its website, “Where we can, we make products into solid form so we can ditch the packaging and preservatives.” What packaging Lush does use is made from 100 percent post-consumer recycled materials.

In sustainability’s new role, consumers look to companies to provide a platform that allows them to make a difference, to do something they might not be able to achieve on their own and feel good about their purchases.

2. Authentic, credible, traceable
Today’s value chain often obscures the connection between food products and their origins. Packaging is an opportunity to provide information about locale and traceability, and re-establish the connection between the consumer and food brand.

Reassurance of authenticity/credibility of products has become important in emerging markets. In China, products like infant formula and milk powder come with verification (such as seals or certification, holograms and QR codes).

Provenance can serve to communicate premium quality, authenticity and unique, distinctive taste. Companies like Japanese snack manufacturer Calbee, which is present in numerous markets, often incorporate local ingredients into many of its snack products in other markets. Heinz’s First Harvest Ketchup (sold in France) represents a unique combination of provenance and season.

3. Branding
In addition to standing out at the shelf, packaging continues to be an important part of branding. Packaging allows marketers and retailers to amplify a brand’s essence, connect with a brand’s heritage, pique interest in trial/purchase, demonstrate brand premium value and allow consumers to express themselves through choice.

Use of limited-edition and exclusive packs saw growth in 2012. Five markets (Japan, Germany, U.S., U.K. and France) account for 68 percent of exclusive/limited edition launches. Beauty and personal care, food and beverage account for 95 percent of launches. Exclusives and limited editions represent a huge opportunity for packaging to drive branding.

• Oreo’s 100th Anniversary packaging demonstrates that heritage, via longevity, does not have to be stuck in the past, but may be reimagined, updated.

• Retro packaging (used by many brands in 2012: Fanta, Ruffles, Doritos, Pepsi and Coke) helps amplify heritage via nostalgia. In addition to evoking fond memories, it can create appeal among younger users.

• 2012 saw the use of well-known designers to create limited-edition packaging with quality/luxury associations: Oria Kiely for Method, Emily Hogarth with Nivea and, of course, Andy Warhol’s iconic re-imagination of Campbell Soup cans.

• From predictability to possibility, new, limited-edition flavors help expand a brand’s equity, while tempting consumers to try/purchase. In essence, limited-time/exclusive flavors feed the consumers’ desire for the new or novel while maintaining the security of a known brand. Consumers are more likely to try new flavors from a brand they already know. Consumers welcome the novelty of limited-time flavors, but also find it intriguing to think differently about a brand.

• Seasonal/holiday and event-related packaging saw huge growth in 2012 (such as at the Olympics). The calendar is an opportunity for brands to create relevance with consumers. For example, snack maker Morinaga released a new package for Dars chocolate bar (intentionally printed backwards), as part of a clever Valentine’s Day promotional campaign. The custom for Valentine’s Day in Japan is for women to present small, inexpensive gifts of chocolate to male coworkers at the office (that is, “giri choco” obligatory chocolate).

 

4. Shoppers manage their budgets

Packaging has the potential to fit with new shopping behaviors. The shopping eco-system, comprised of both shoppers and shops, has witnessed some dramatic changes.

Research reported by SymphonyIRI’s Time and Trends suggests that shopping behavior has changed in response to the economic situation. There is more “just-in-time” purchasing (such as fill-in or top-off trips) taking place, and less pantry loading. Retail formats have come to reflect these changes, with different trip types tending to be associated with specific retail formats (such as Tesco Extra for big trips, Metro and Express for Top-off trips). Many retailers have also been experimenting with smaller formats (Tesco Metro and Express formats, Walmart Express and City Target).

Smaller, easier-to-carry packs with smaller price points hold potential not only in Europe and the U.S., but in traditional trade retailers in many emerging markets (such as kirana-India, changarro-Mexico and sari-sari-Philippines). As shoppers continue to cope with economic situations that stretch their budgets, they are trying to manage their basket. Flexible packaging is poised to play a huge role in Asia in the smaller/traditional retailers-for snacks, bakery items and more-to help shoppers maintain their budgets.

 

5. Wellness: What shoppers seek

Making it easier for shoppers to find what they are looking for in the health and wellness category is the Holy Grail. The kinds of mental shortcuts shoppers are using-the information or clues shoppers are looking for when facing the shelf-are critical for finding their way through the crowded, ever-changing shelves of health and wellness products. Key to success is focusing on the information that is most crucial in the minds of shoppers.

• Calling out key benefits or ingredients makes it easier for the shopper to find the right product for their needs. Mintel’s GNPD database indicates that claims such as “suitable for” (allergen-related claims) and “natural/organic/bio” confer currency on products. Each of these represents nearly 25 percent of the claims on new food/beverage product packaging introductions in 2012 from around the globe. Moreover, ingredients like Vitamins A, C, E and antioxidants hold positive associations for consumers/shoppers.

• Recent examples include GlaxoSmithKline’s Ribena Plus drink concentrate (U.K.), with real fruit juice, fortified with vitamins A, C and antioxidant vitamin E; Rewe Frei Von Backmischung für Schoko Muffins (Germany), a gluten-free cake mix for chocolate muffins with chocolate glaze; and Danone’s Activia Peach Nectar (Brazil), with fruit and prebiotic fibers. The goodness, simplicity and naturalness of ingredients are important.

• Beauty and personal care shoppers are more focused on benefits (such as beauty enhancing, brightening, reduced redness and toning). There are other “clues” packaging can provide that serve as reasons to believe, and make it easier to “choose at the shelf”-free from, natural/organic ingredients, vitamin/mineral fortified, dermatologically tested, clinically tested or hypoallergenic. Some recent examples include Tony Moly’s Clean Dew Broccoli Sprout Cleansing Cream (South Korea), made with blueberry, tomato and broccoli extracts, or Drogerie Markt’s Alverde Naturkosmetik Natural Light Make-Up (Germany), light formula with organic papaya and agave extracts for moisturizing. Complicated products require a simple story!

 

Create consumer relevance

In conclusion, the opportunities identified are based on shopper/consumer trends, and represent not so much predictions, as opportunities exhibited in the marketplace. While packaging has long been one of the most efficient marketing/media vehicles (10 to 25 percent of the cost advertising, promotion or display programs), technology, innovation, changing views and behaviors of consumers afford large potential for packaging.

With so many claims vying for attention at the shelf, providing simple, easy to understand benefits on the package is a great aid to shoppers. It communicates that the brand “gets them.”

Finally, more than any other time, packaging is poised to play a heroic role in the building of brand and business. As our review has shown, packaging can play a larger strategic role in helping brands create relevance for consumers.

 

Jim Lucas is evp, Global Insights & Strategy, at Schawk Inc. (www.schawk.com), a leading provider of brand development and deployment services. An avid student of shoppers and retailers, Lucas has been engaged in the development and practice of shopper marketing. Contact him at James.Lucas@schawk.com.
Mintel, 312-932-0400, www.mintel.com
SymphonyIRI, 312-726-1221, www.symphonyiri.com

 

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Where Packaging Came From: Where Packaging Is Going

Where Packaging Came From: Where Packaging Is Going

Where packaging came from:

Packaging, according to the Oxford English dictionary, is a noun, meaning ‘materials used to wrap or protect goods’.

End-user or consumer packaging is a relatively new phenomenon. In the 1700’s and earlier, packaging was mainly used within shipping, for containment of materials. Protection or preservation of goods was minimal.

However, in the 1800’s, the industrial revolution and innovation in packaging machinery led to an explosion in packaging usage. Metal cans were seen from 1810 and early forms of boxes and cartons began to be mass produced in the mid to late 19th century. Shopping bags became common as bag-making and other packaging machinery was developed.

Going into the 1900’s, packaging began to be used for marketing. It quickly became a differentiator between competitors and was used to communicate branding, quality, reliability and other important product attributes. Point-of-sale material and display packaging became a natural extension. After the Second World War, packaging was considered a major marketing and advertising medium.

As convenience began to dominate consumer needs and aspirations, supermarket shopping and convenience foods emerged. Pre-packed products took off and drove further packaging use and innovation. However, towards the end of the 20th century consumerism was becoming tempered by growing environmental concerns which led to the introduction of recycling schemes for bottles, cans and paper packaging.

Where packaging is going:

Today, governments and companies are focused on reducing CO2 emissions and carbon footprint. This calls for everyone to be responsible with their use of packaging and we would suggest taking the following steps, where possible:

Cut out unnecessary packaging Substitute packaging with recycled and recyclable packaging where possible Reuse packaging and pass it on where possible

Many companies are spending a lot of time, money and effort calculating their CO2 emissions and working with suppliers such as Davpack to reduce their carbon footprint and packaging waste.

We are also actively encouraging companies to reuse packaging materials and choose ‘greener’ options where economically viable. See our series of articles suggesting ways to reuse common packaging items such as jiffy mailing bags, cardboard boxes, postal boxes, bubble wrap and tissue paper

 “As a specialist packaging supplies company we believe we have a duty to encourage Customers to give greater thought to the packaging they buy and make better use of the packaging materials they retain.”

For more information about packaging materials, recycled and bio-degradable packaging, or to buy packaging online, why not visit the Davpack online packaging superstore, or call 01332 821 200 and speak to one of our experts….we can even give you tips on reusing or saving on packaging.

Article from articlesbase.com

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