American Beverage Association Celebrates Earth Day

On Earth Day, and every day, the American Beverage Association (ABA) and its member companies demonstrate their longstanding commitment to our environment through ongoing efforts to further reduce their environmental impact.

“The beverage industry’s leadership in environmental sustainability has never been stronger than it is today,” says Susan Neely, ABA president and CEO. “We are leading a race to the top in the consumer products industry through the design of lightweight, more environmentally-friendly packaging.  Through our support, we are seeing comprehensive, efficient and effective community recycling programs get off the ground, including one launched this past year through a successful partnership with Florida’s Palm Beach County.  Our work is helping in communities throughout America, and as an industry, we have only just begun.”

This past year, the ABA supported a pilot project called “Recycle on the Go” in Palm Beach County, Fla.  Parks, beaches and boardwalks were the target locations for placement of 125 recycling bins, which were paired together with waste bins.  Promotional activities were carried out by the local jurisdictions, including North Palm Beach, Delray Beach, Lake Park, Wellington and West Palm Beach.  The goals of the project were to:

  • Measure and improve public space recycling performance;
  • Create an effective, attractive and sustainable recycling system for beverage containers generated in the public space for each participating jurisdiction;
  • Provide opportunities for the public to recycle beverage containers and reduce litter; and
  • Increase public awareness of opportunities to recycle while away from home. 

 Data compilation is currently underway, but it is expected to show that the project is working to capture a significant amount of recyclable beverage containers and reduce the amount of litter in the locations that bins were placed.

“We care deeply about our industry’s impact on the environment; our operations reflect the priority and longstanding commitment we have to a clean environment,” said Kate Krebs, ABA senior environmental policy advisor. “Most importantly, we are beginning to see some real, positive change.  Our companies are engaging with citizens and communities to partner on projects that encourage everyone to do better, do more and do the right thing when it comes to the health of our planet.  On Earth Day, it is important to acknowledge these efforts are working.”

Some examples of ABA member companies’ efforts include:

  • The Coca-Cola Company is working to expand access to recycling and increase participation.  In partnership with Keep America Beautiful, the Company recently announced the recipients of its Recycling Bin Grant program, which will help more than 150 communities across America advance their recycling efforts this year.  Through this initiative and others, The Coca-Cola Company has now placed more than 180,000 bins throughout North America since 2008.  This is in support of Coca-Cola’s goal to recover 50 percent of the equivalent bottles and cans it places in market by 2015.  In addition, Coca-Cola diverts more than 95 percent of solid waste from landfills in its North American facilities.
  • Since its establishment in 2008, Dr Pepper Snapple Group has invested resources into aligning and integrating its operations to serve customers and consumers more efficiently and, as a result, conserve fuel and reduce emissions in transporting products.  The company has removed millions of miles from its over-the-road distribution footprint as a result of improved logistics, including intermodal transportation. DPS is also on track to reach its goal to replace 60,000 older vending machines and coolers with EPA Energy Star-rated cold drink equipment that consumes approximately 30 percent less energy.  In addition, through container lightweighting and other packaging improvements, DPS has conserved 46 million pounds of PET since 2007. The company also has increased its diversion of manufacturing solid waste to 82 percent and just last month announced a partnership with Keep America Beautiful to fund the placement of recycling bins in public parks.
  • To celebrate the launch of its new 0.5L ReBorn bottle, made with 50 percent recycled plastic, Nestlé Waters North America’s Arrowhead brand launched the “Recycling Is A Beautiful Thing” video with visual elements created out of recycled materials.  The video shows artistically beautiful ways to repurpose recycleable materials with the goal of inspiring people to recycle more.  Last November, Arrowhead also partnered with Keep California Beautiful (KCB) to promote America Recycles Day in San Francisco. Arrowhead, KCB and other community partners hosted a recycling education and beautification event near Fisherman’s Wharf with more than 150 volunteers.  Arrowhead also provided funds to install four solar-powered BigBelly bins that serve as a one-stop solution for recyclables, compostables and trash, which was a first for public spaces in the United States.
  • PepsiCo was recognized with the prestigious 2012 Stockholm Industry Water Award for its comprehensive approach to water stewardship.  It announced that it reached its goal to improve global water use efficiency by more than 20 percent per unit of production four years ahead of its 2015 target date.  Last month it announced that it had reached another goal in partnering to provide access to safe water to three million people in developing countries by the end of 2015, three years early.  The company’s Dream Machine Recycling Initiative, done in collaboration with Waste Management and Keep America Beautiful, continues to address the need for greater public access to recycling solutions and to help increase the national recycling rate. Since program launch, 5,500 Dream Machine bins and electronic kiosks have been placed, and nearly 1,000 K-12 schools across 42 states have participated in the Dream Machine Recycle Rally program.  This has resulted in more than 190 million recyclable bottles and cans being diverted from landfills to recycling.

For more information on the beverage industry’s environmental stewardship, visit www.ameribev.org

 

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

 

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Mohawk Recognized as One of the Greenest Organizations in the U.S.

At Mohawk, North America’s largest privately-owned manufacturer of fine papers, envelopes and specialty substrates for commercial and digital printing, every day is Earth Day.  

In recognition of Earth Day 2013, Mohawk announces it has been named to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s national list of 100% Green Power Users list for the seventh year in a row.  Mohawk is ranked among other leading renewable energy purchasers including Intel, Whole Foods Market, Staples, the US EPA, Union College, and the Empire State Building.  Mohawk continues its membership in the EPA’s Green Power Leadership Club which it has held since 2005.

“We are pleased to again be recognized by the EPA for our environmental and sustainable business practices.  As a paper manufacturer, we have always understood that our dependence on basic resources such as water, wood fiber, and energy creates a unique responsibility for environmental stewardship. We continually examine every aspect of our business with the objective of minimizing our environmental footprint in every way possible. Environmental responsibility is at the core of Mohawk’s ethos,” said Michelle Carpenter, vice president, Environmental and Energy Stewardship, Mohawk.

The EPA defines “green power” as renewable energy sources with the highest environmental benefits: solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, some biomass, and low-impact small hydro.  The 100% Green Power User designation means Mohawk purchases green power at a level matching 100% of on-site electric use, and reducing the environmental impacts of conventional electricity use.

Earth Day 2013 Initiatives
As a company, Mohawk will recognize Earth Day 2013 by encouraging employees to participate in the company’s third annual Earth Day clean-ups. Employees at all Mohawk locations will be encouraged to clean up community areas outside of their workplaces.

In addition, Mohawk will continue its support of charity: water via customer incentives on the company’s retail site.  Beginning on Earth Day, Mohawk will match all charity: water donations made during check-out. Customers currently have the option to donate $5, $10 or $20 – so all donations will now be doubled thru 4/30/13, courtesy of Mohawk.  For more information about charity: water, visit http://my.charitywater.org

Committed to a Cleaner, Healthier Environment
As a leader in environmentally and socially responsible business practices, Mohawk was the first U.S. manufacturer of commercial printing papers to match 100% of its electricity with wind power renewable energy credits and the first U.S. premium paper mill to shift toward carbon neutral production. Mohawk’s portfolio of recycled papers is certified by Green Seal and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

Mohawk began participating in the Green Power Partnership with the company’s first windpower REC purchase in 2003.  In 2005, Mohawk began to match 100% of the electricity used in manufacturing operations with RECs.  This practice has continued to the present day. 

Mohawk is proud to be an environmentally and socially responsible business, and takes pride in the company’s numerous environmental partnerships and certifications, including longstanding alliances with:

Walking the Talk
Environmental commitment, social responsibility and corporate stewardship are woven into the fabric of Mohawk’s culture and business practices.

Mohawk’s management believes that business and industry have the creative capital and financial incentive to find innovative solutions to the most pressing environmental issues of our day: climate change, depletion of natural resources, and dependence on fossil fuels.

From simple activities like desk-side recycling, to designing and providing a unique Environmental Calculator on the company’s website, to complex decisions about manufacturing techniques, energy choices and vendor selection, nothing is left unexamined by Mohawk, a company that truly walks the talk when it comes to its environmental commitment.

For more information about Mohawk’s environmental and sustainable business practices, visit http://www.mohawkconnects.com/company/environment.

For more information on EPA’s Green Power Partnership, visit http://www.epa.gov/greenpower/toplists/partner100.htm

ABOUT MOHAWK
Mohawk is North America’s largest privately-owned manufacturer of fine papers and envelopes which are preferred for commercial and digital printing, photo specialties and high-end direct mail.  Mohawk fine papers and envelopes include the signature brands Mohawk Superfine and Strathmore, as well as proprietary treatments Inxwell and i-Tone. With a culture of innovation, Mohawk’s business model now extends beyond paper manufacturing into new areas of growth, including digital substrates and web-based software platforms, which connect designers and printers to new markets. 

As a leader in environmentally and socially responsible business practices, Mohawk was the first U.S. manufacturer of commercial printing papers to match 100% of its electricity with wind power renewable energy credits and the first U.S. premium paper mill to shift toward carbon neutral production. Mohawk’s portfolio of recycled papers is certified by Green Seal and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

Mohawk is a fourth-generation, family-owned and operated business based in Cohoes, New York, with global sales and operations located throughout North America, Europe and Asia.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Target to give away 1.5 million reusable bags for Earth Day






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/14/2013 9:10:03 AM





 

 

Target reusable bags

In honor of Earth Day, Target will give away 1.5 million reusable bags at stores across the country on Sun., April 21, beginning at 10 a.m., as well as sustainable product coupon books that offer more than $40 in savings.

 

 

Of the 1.5 million reusable bags, 250,000 will also contain samples of sustainable products, including method Dish Soap, Annie’s Bunny Grahams, Seventh Generation Laundry Detergent and Burt’s Bees Moisturizing Cream.

 

Target’s Earth Day giveaway encourages guests to take advantage of Target’s five-cent reusable bag discount (guests receive a five-cent discount for each reusable bag they use when they buy something at the store) and experience a selection of products that are environmentally friendly, while effectively balancing price, performance and convenience.

By providing guests free reusable bags and rewarding them with each use, Target helps guests save money and make small changes that add up to make a big difference. Target is committed to helping guests lead more sustainable lifestyles by providing the right information, tools and incentives to make it easy.

 

Source: Target

 

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






RSS

Reprints/License

Print

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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Reprints/License

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    We would love your feedback!

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Canon Resource Center






Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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