Menasha Packaging to Energize GlobalShop 2014

Menasha Packaging will spotlight how it’s energizing clients’ sales with powerful end-to-end solutions during GlobalShop 2014 from March 18 to 20 at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nev. Menasha’s promotional intelligence team will connect with attendees at booth 3241 throughout the annual trade show. 

For 165 years, Menasha has been dedicated to helping its clients move and sell more product. As a market leader, Menasha is able to amplify customers’ retail promotional solutions with exclusive retail insights, resources and innovation. The resulting merchandising solutions are more effective at retail by grabbing attention, increasing trial, strengthening brands and increasing ROI.

With its commitment to providing complete merchandising solutions and a comprehensive network of operations, services and co-pack solutions, the promotional experts of Menasha hope tradeshow attendees will be energized by Menasha’s full capabilities. 

“Menasha harnesses the power of retail integration by bridging the gap between consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies and retailers,” says Dennis Bonn, vice president of marketing for Menasha Packaging. “During GlobalShop, our team will demonstrate how Menasha’s array of connections empower manufacturers and retailers to optimally sell, protect and promote their products at retail.” 

GlobalShop is the world’s largest annual trade show and conference dedicated to store design, visual merchandising and shopper marketing.

About Menasha Packaging
Celebrating 165 years in business, Menasha Packaging Company, LLC, based in Neenah, Wisconsin, is a subsidiary of Menasha Corporation and has more than 2,400 employees at locations nationwide. Menasha Packaging is a leading provider of graphic consumer packaging, merchandising solutions, corrugated packaging, food packaging, shipping containers, material handling solutions, pack-out and fulfillment services. With a network of design, sales service centers, corrugated and paperboard manufacturing plants, and fulfillment facilities located throughout the United States, the company’s mission is to help its customers protect, move and promote their products better than anyone else. Visit its website at www.menashapackaging.com.

About Menasha Corporation
Menasha Corporation is a leading corrugated and plastic packaging manufacturer and supply chain solutions provider specializing in retail merchandising packaging and displays, plastic reusable containers and pallets, protective packaging interiors, and packaging supply chain and fulfillment services. Menasha Corporation’s products and services are used by major food, beverage, consumer products, healthcare, pharmaceutical, industrial and automotive companies. Established in 1849, Menasha Corporation is one of America’s oldest privately held, family-owned manufacturing companies. Headquartered in Neenah, Wisconsin, the company employs approximately 4,000 employees in over 75 facilities in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information, visit www.menasha.com.

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Dow Features 100% PE Recyclable Stand Up Pouch at PACK EXPO Las Vegas 2013

Dow Features 100% PE Recyclable Stand Up Pouch at PACK EXPO Las Vegas 2013

Dow is proud to once again serve as title sponsor of this year’s The Showcase of Packaging Innovations® at PACK EXPO Las Vegas 2013, where the award winning 100% PE Recyclable Stand Up Pouch from Dow Performance Packaging will be on display.  

The 100% PE Stand Up Pouch is an innovative solution for food packaging that offers a more sustainable proposition of recyclability. Dow’s Performance Packaging business, in partnership with a converter and brand owner, introduced the pouch in Latin America earlier this year and the design has since won several industry awards for its unique qualities.

“The Stand Up Pouch is a game-changing technology that will benefit Dow customers and the entire value chain,” said Nestor de Mattos, group marketing director for Food and Specialty Packaging at Dow. “We are pleased to be once again sponsoring The Showcase of Packaging Innovations pavilion at PACK EXPO, because promoting award-winning packaging design, like the 100% PE Stand Up Pouch, puts a spotlight on ingenuity and helps push the industry forward.” 

In addition to sponsoring the pavilion, Dow will participate in this year’s PACK EXPO with a full program of customer hospitality, informative thought-leader presentations, and the introduction of new technologies and capabilities.

An example of Dow’s commitment to industry collaboration and growth is Dow Performance Packaging’s highly regarded Networks with Answers (NwA) seminar series. The presentations will feature internal and external speakers on topics that are relevant to the industry today and attendance is open to customers, show attendees and other interested parties.  

On Monday, September 23 at 11:00 a.m. PST, Networks with Answers will feature a special presentation on Dow’s newest collaborative capability to accelerate packaging innovation – Pack Studios. Connecting Dow’s global network of industry experts with Dow Performance Packaging’s broad product portfolio, materials science labs and application testing capabilities, Pack Studios provides a collaborative environment to accelerate solutions for better packaging.  Located at Dow’s Texas Operations complex in Freeport, Texas, Pack Studios Freeport is one of four state-of-the-art collaboration centers Dow currently operates across the globe.  

To learn more about the latest innovative products from Dow, customers are invited to visit the Dow Customer Center located next door to the Las Vegas Convention Center in the Renaissance Hotel. Dow’s PACK EXPO Las Vegas 2013 portfolio will include:

·         100% Polyethylene Stand Up Pouch is manufactured with only one raw material, polyethylene, making it easier to recycle, and it can be used in a variety of markets including beverages, cosmetics, dry and frozen foods, and cleaning products. The Stand Up Pouch is developed from Dow’s patented technology which allows the unique package to “stand up” on store shelves providing companies with greater brand visibility. The award winning Stand Up Pouch will also be on display at the Showcase of Packaging Innovations.

·         LAMAL™ 90-103 Adhesive is a urethane cure alternative to traditional adhesives. LAMAL has been specially formulated for metal adhesion, being alcohol dilutable like existing LAMAL™ products and can be used in a variety of packaging applications including meat, cheese and snack food packaging, coffee pouch laminations and industrial barrier laminations.

·         MOR-FREE™ L82-105/C33 is an solventless, two component aliphatic  polyurethane adhesive that delivers a fast room temperature cure with no need for a hot room. This gives converters energy and space savings, and the adhesive can be used in a variety of flexible food packaging applications including higher temperature applications.  

·         Dow will highlight two products from the ADCOTE™ family. ADCOTE™ L 74-112 is a non-isocyanate curing solvent based adhesive that offers no interference from retained solvents in printed materials and can be used in a variety of packaging applications. ADCOTE™ L 76-185 provides higher running solids, a lower tendency to foam in application, a more stable mixed pot life and offers improved performance for retort applications including delivering improved adhesion to oxide coated barrier films and resistance to the most aggressive foodstuff.

 

Dow Performance Packaging is committed to advancing the plastic packaging sector with the development of innovative materials and technologies that further the performance value of resins, films, and adhesives products used in packaging. With upcoming facility upgrades to support Dow’s laminating adhesives business, to collaborative opportunities that enable packaging innovation through Pack Studios, Dow is the industry’s leading resource for solutions for better packaging. 

 

For more information about Dow please visit Dow Performance Packaging, or visit the Dow Customer Center in the Renaissance Ballroom I and II during PACK EXPO Las Vegas 2013.

 

About Dow

Dow (NYSE: DOW) combines the power of science and technology to passionately innovate what is essential to human progress. The Company connects chemistry and innovation with the principles of sustainability to help address many of the world’s most challenging problems such as the need for clean water, renewable energy generation and conservation, and increasing agricultural productivity. Dow’s diversified industry-leading portfolio of specialty chemical, advanced materials, agrosciences and plastics businesses delivers a broad range of technology-based products and solutions to customers in approximately 160 countries and in high growth sectors such as electronics, water, energy, coatings and agriculture. In 2012, Dow had annual sales of approximately $57 billion and employed approximately 54,000 people worldwide. The Company’s more than 5,000 products are manufactured at 188 sites in 36 countries across the globe. References to “Dow” or the “Company” mean The Dow Chemical Company and its consolidated subsidiaries unless otherwise expressly noted. More information about Dow can be found at www.dow.com.

 

 

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Brazilian Packaging Association (ABRE) | 2013 o Prêmio ABRE da Embalagem Brasileira

 

Brazilian Packaging Association (ABRE) | 2013 o Prêmio ABRE da Embalagem Brasileira
www.abre.org.br
The Brazilian Packaging Award of the Brazilian Packaging Association (ABRE) created its awards program in 2001. Over its 10-plus years of existence, ABRE has awarded prizes to companies of all sizes showing that proper packaging is essential for all types of products from different categories, providing quality of life for people. Packages are critiqued for excellence in quality, technology, design, functionality, innovation and sustainability.

Gold—Savory Food Packaging
Atum Salera
Submitted by: Salera Alimentos
This package protects and showcases fish products for a small company that has limited financial and machinery resources. Brightly printed cartons have a cleverly placed window that lets consumers see the clear, glass jars of packaged fish inside. A stylishly retro graphic design delivers shelf appeal.

Gold—Alcoholic Beverages Packaging
Cachaça Gouveia Brasil
Submitted by: Verallia
Extra-clear glass and a complex design make this 700-mL bottle a stunner. The structural design uses two transverse planes that have an offset axis, yet the axis of the bottle as a whole remains aligned.

Gold—International Competitiveness: Food and Beverages Products for Export
Linha Brazilian Soul
Submitted by: Vinícola Aurora
The brand uses its Brazilian origins as a differentiator. The package elegantly expresses Brazilian culture with a hot-stamped design that features colors from the Brazilian flag. A small picture of the Brazilian flag on the labels’ front panels further attests to the wines’ origins. The resulting packages align with brand values, look great on shelves and are well received by customers.

Gold Winner—Packaging for a Family of Products
Linha de Maquiagem Phebo
Submitted by: Casa Granado
Hot-stamped silver is paired with transparent packaging to present a premium image that also showcases the cosmetics’ colors. To draw shoppers’ attention, the elegant primary packages are housed in bright coral-colored cartons.

Gold—Perfume Packaging
Perfumes Quem Disse, Berenice?
Submitted by: Wheaton Brasil
This perfume package puts the brand in consumers’ hands. The PP cap, which is fashioned to resemble the Quem Disse, Berenice? brand logo, makes the package a standout but is perfectly paired with the round glass bottle. Decorative silkscreen printing is used to differentiate scents, and three varieties feature hot-stamped gold lettering.

Gold—Promotional Packaging; Gold—Graphic Design: Non-alcoholic Beverages
Schweppes 230 Anos
Submitted by: Coca-Cola Brasil
Schweppes turned 230 years old this year. To celebrate, the brand released seven retro cans—one for each Schweppes flavor. Each design was dressed with a custom illustration that represents a different era during Schweppes’ history. A matte finish projects a premium image for the entire limited-edition collection.

Gold—Graphic Design: Sweets and Desserts
Latas Colecionáveis Talento
Submitted by: FutureBrand
These gift tins express the spirit of Brazil with colorful illustrations that celebrate the plurality of a village of colonial houses, the joy of Carnival, urban street art, the country’s varied cultures and people, and the daily optimism of Brazilians.

Gold—Graphic Design: General Products
Green by Missako
Submitted by: Green by Missako
The challenge was to project the free spirit of the brand within the whimsical world of children. Cheerful illustrations bring in elements of fun while uncluttered lines and vibrant colors deliver shelf impact.

Gold—Marketing: Communication Strategy
Encontre sua Coca-Cola Zero
Submitted by: Coca-Cola Brasil
Coca-Cola Brasil courts 20-something year old consumers, with this customized packaging campaign. It printed 150 of the most common names in Brazil on Coca-Cola Zero cans. The limited-edition offering helped consumers identify with the Coca-Cola Zero brand and sparked conversations on social media.

Gold—Special: The Open Choice
Se Beber, Vá De Carona
Submitted by: Routhier & Darricarrère
The shipping case and wine label were designed side-by-side to tell the story of the Brazilian winery and its French origins. When Routhier & Darricarrère’s owners first arrived in Brazil, they bought a Volkswagen bus to tour the country’s beautiful beaches. The wine’s shipping case pays tribute to this memory by mimicking the van’s appearance. The novel design is balanced with a sophisticated color palette dominated by bright reds and clean whites. The theme and color scheme is carried over to the bottle decoration with red capsules and white labels.

Gold—Cosmetics and Personal Care Packaging; Gold—Sustainable Packaging
Sou
Submitted by: Natura
Sou’s easy-to-use package breaks category paradigms with a design that requires 70% less material to manufacture than conventional hair- and body-care packaging. The drop-shaped pouch also reduces product waste by enabling near-complete product evacuation.

Gold—Graphic Design: Cosmetics, Personal Care, Health and Pharmaceutical
Redesign Sempre Livre
Submitted by: Johnson & Johnson do Brasil
Sempre Livre’s updated look clearly communicates the product’s benefits with informative graphics on color-coded backgrounds with a lighthearted design. To ensure consistency across the color coding system, all colors had to be tested and validated, with some pigments requiring reformulation.

Gold—Special: The Consumer’s Choice
Fragrância Linda Lindinha de O Boticário
Submitted by: Grupo Boticário
Recognizing that girls often imitate the woman they find the greatest source of inspiration, love, joy, confidence and style—their mothers, the brand created this youthful fragrance. The fragrance’s bottle is painted with glitter to bring a sense of play, while the transparent, thick-walled plastic used for the overcap and the simple metal coating for the sprayer speak to this generation’s preference for minimalist design. The carton continues this simple-yet-playful design with relief and sparkling lamination.

Gold—Graphic Design: Savories
Liggero
Submitted by: Narita Design
The brand identity, name and package design lets consumers know that Liggero packaged pastas deliver fast-and-easy meal preparation with taste appeal. 

Gold—Nonalcoholic Beverages Packaging
Suco Casa Madeira
Submitted by: Verallia
Inspired by the jam jar that Casa Valduga, the makers of juice, already have in its lineup, this bottle highlights the nutritional benefits of the product. The bottle is shaped like the body of a thin, tall and healthy person. On the shoulders of the bottle sits the Casa Maderia Coat of Arms in high relief, which helps brand the product and presents a premium image.

Gold—Packaging for Micro- and Small-sized Companies
Linha Iandê—Aisó
Submitted by: SA2 Design e Comunicação
A one-color design keeps converting costs down for this double-duty package. The carton easily transforms to a point-of-purchase display, which encourages retailers to place this Brazilian brand alongside higher-priced imports.

Gold—Packaging in General
Vedapren Fast
Submitted by: Pande
A rectangular design allows the tubs to be nested for transport to a filling facility, and it provides strong brand differentiation because competing products are sold in round buckets. The shape makes the product easier for consumers to use because it accommodates paint rollers as well as brushes—eliminating the need to purchase trays.

Gold—Structural Design: Functionality
Embalagem para Implantes Dentários
Submitted by: Neodent
This single package accommodates a large range of implants, despite differences in geometry, lengths and diameter. Its design protects the product’s sterility and bio-safety while making the product easier for dentists to handle efficiently. The functionality comes from a vertical-and-horizontal lift system that works with a gripper device to safely move and place the implant.

Gold—International Competitiveness: General Products for Export
x-liso
Submitted by: Brazilian Secrets Hair
Sophisticated photography and a minimalist design aims to appeal to an international market while subtly reminding consumers that the products are made in Brazil.

Gold—Sweets and Desserts Packaging
Iorgurte Grego Batavo
Submitted by: BRF
This PP package for Greek-style yogurt is decorated with an in-mold label that helps differentiate the brand from a competitor offering similar products. The ergonomically shaped bottles help project a premium image, and an aluminum seal assures consumers of product safety. Spent packaging can be easily recycled because the primary structures and their labels are made from the same material.

Gold—Technological: Beverage Packaging
Rótulo Adesivado
Submitted by: Mazda Embalagens
A pre-glued label enables label application without a hot-melt gluer and makes the PET bottle fully recyclable because the label leaves no residue after removal.

Gold—Graphic Design: Redesign for Food and Beverages
Marilan—Pit Stop
Submitted by: M Design
To maintain its position as one of the category leaders in the cracker segment, Pit Stop needed to evolve its package communications with a new logo and overall design. The updated triangular logo has a shape evocative of a road sign to encourage shoppers to stop and look at the products. Bigger, bolder type over variety-specific shapes help shoppers identify and buy their favorite flavor from the 14-item product line.

Gold—Structural Design: Shape
PacXpert
Submitted by: Dow
This packaging structure was designed in the U.S. but has characteristics especially suitable for Brazil’s paint and food-service markets. It has a large capacity (3.6 to 18 L), enables almost complete product evacuation, a large-diameter nozzle for easy dispensing, top and bottom handles for precise application and easy handling, stability on shelf even when partially empty, and is made from materials that can be easily recycled.

Gold—Packaging: Food Service, Delivery and Carry Out
America Delivery—Embalagens
Submitted by: Dezign com Z
Food-service packaging helps unify the consumer experience from table to take-out, with messaging written from the perspective of a friendly waiter. The conversational branding also prompts a desire to taste delivered products even before the boxes and bags have been opened.

Gold—Technology: Food Packaging
Smart Cap
Submitted by: Revpack Tecnologia
The tottle’s closure is made with a cap-and-valve injection process that enables the automatic application of seals. The closure is also easy to recycle because only one resin was used for both the cap and valve.

Gold—Technology: Cosmetics, Personal Care, Health and Pharmaceutical
Frasco 1000 mL MAX VAC Embramed
Submitted by: Ab Plast
The 1000-mL PET-glycol bottle is designed as a lightweight replacement for the glass containers often used with medical suction pumps. The break-resistant bottle is blow molded with a 90 finish neck and very thick walls that prevent the package from collapsing during vacuum application. A strong sealing system holds the vacuum.

Gold—Graphic Design, Family of Products
Quem Disse, Berenice?
Submitted by: Matriz Escritório de Desenho
Grupo Boticário uses strong patterns, metallic inks and bright colors to bring a cheerful personality to its new makeup brand. The look for Quem Disse, Berenice? inspires and emotionally connects with consumers.

Gold—Graphic Design: Redesign for General Products
York
Submitted by: Matriz Escritório de Desenho
Celebrating its 60th anniversary, the York brand, from Hypermarcas, has an updated look that spans its entire product line. The new design modernizes the brand mark by
integrating the Y monogram with a cotton symbol. The York endorsements on all products, even those belonging to its sub-brands, were also made more prominent, which boosts the branding and marketing strength of the brand.

Gold—Technology: General Products
Bandeja para transporte de Placa de Circuito Impresso Sensível
Submitted by: Waco Thermoforming Solutions
This returnable package was designed to transport conductive materials. The package’s high-impact resistance prevents the containers from breaking.

Gold—Special: Student
Octa Cooler MMA
Submitted by: Douglas Cardoso do Espasso Silva at Oswaldo Cruz University
The package includes an inner container that transforms the box into a cooler that can be easily carried to game-watching parties and other social events.

To see this article as it appeared in the 2013 Annual Awards Issue in print, click here.

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Dei Fratelli expands tomato products line in shelf-stable cartons






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/1/2013 9:45:23 AM





 

Dei Fratelli Truly

Hirzel Canning Co. & Farms, the family-owned and operated company that produces the Dei Fratelli brand, has added Dei Fratelli Truly Tomatoes to its extensive line of tomato products. The three product varieties include Petite Cut Tomatoes in a Light Puree; Finely Chopped Tomatoes in a Light Puree with Onion, Carrot and Celery; and Rustic Cut Tomatoes in a Light Puree. The three new products are the first chopped tomatoes grown, produced and packaged in the United States that are available in shelf-stable carton packs from SIG Combibloc. The Dei Fratelli Truly carton packs will be available beginning of August 2013.

 

 

Crafted for “home chefs,” these products offer a premium tomato product packaged in an environmentally friendly carton pack, say company officials. The modern packaging allows Hirzel Canning Co. & Farms to provide optimal protection for foods that retains high quality over a prolonged period without the use of preservatives or refrigeration. The BPA-free carton packs are convenient to store, handle and dispose.

 

The aseptic carton pack is composed up to 75 percent wood fibers, a renewable resource, which is verifiably obtained from controlled sources and responsibly managed forests. Carton packs have a smaller environmental impact and use fewer fossil resources than other food packaging for long-life food products. And they are100 percent recyclable where facilities exist.

 

Dei Fratelli Truly Tomatoes are grown on local, family farms in the rich, fertile soil of the Lake Erie Basin. After a short journey from their growers’ fields, the tomatoes are carefully selected for the distinctive Truly Tomato products. Moreover, the tomatoes are preserved within a maximum of 10 hours after harvesting. This innovative concept and
traceability is called “Field to Carton.” The tomatoes are packed in a delicate, light puree providing a rich tomato flavor and contain no artificial additives or preservatives.

 

“It’s about quality. When a product’s ingredients are so simple, they have to be quality and that has always been a focus for the Hirzel family. With local growers, we are able to monitor every aspect of the production from seed to shelf—ensuring that only the highest quality tomatoes make it into our products,” says Stephen Hirzel, president. “Each variety of our Truly Tomatoes offers ‘home chefs’ a premium foundation for authentic soups, stews and sauces. We anticipate this new line of products generating renewed enthusiasm in the shelf-stable tomato category.”

 

Source: SIG Combibloc

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‘Chromatografting’ imparts barrier to paper






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A sustainable method from BT3 Technologies of France deposits fatty acids on paper substrates to yield superior barrier properties against moisture and oxygen.


Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/17/2013 6:32:00 PM






 

BT3 Molecules


BT3 Technologies’ self-coined chromatografting (see sidebar at end) technology imparts a barrier to paper substrates using “green chemistry,” taking its inspiration from aquatic birds like ducks and swans that can glide through water without getting soaked. You may never have considered that the secret to waterfowls’ water repellency is hydrophobic (“water hating”) waxes in the form of esters between long-chain alcohols and long-chain fatty acids.

 

Now the start-up company wants to see its technology take flight with the development and commercialization of products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials with these unique properties:

• Water repellence

• Grease repellence

• Gas barrier properties

• Remain recyclable and biodegradable.

 

The company’s main targeted markets are papers and corrugated cases, food packaging and textiles.
What the company’s researchers saw several years ago was a pressing need for the development of new technological solutions that would allow the production of papers and boards with good barrier properties that did not hamper their sustainability characteristics. To this end, the BT3 team has been working for some time on the potential of molecular grafting to achieve barrier properties using cellulosic substrates.

 

In 2010, Cleantech was formed in Grenoble, France, with a six-person staff and backed by 15 years of R&D from the CNRS-CERMAV (www.cermav.cnrs.fr) and with a five year partnership with the French pulp and paper technical center, Centre du Papier Technique (CTP, www.webctp.com). BT3 was formed to develop and sell products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials.

 

Update at TAPPI symposium

 

What has come out of that group is summarized in an abstract for a technical paper that BT3 presented last September at the 12th Technical Assn. of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) Advanced Coating Fundamentals Symposium that provides a good overview into what their development is about: “Cellulose-based products such as papers and boards are exceptionally versatile and attractive materials notably from the point of view of sustainability.

 

“Compared to their plastic film competitors, their application potential is however hampered by their lack of barrier resistance to water, grease and gases. Composite multilayer structures have then to be [developed and produced], with an obvious, strong negative impact on sustainability. Chromatografting (or chromatogeny) has been shown to be able to provide a partial answer to this problem. It involves the molecular grafting of long-chain natural fatty acids upon the external OH groups of cellulosic fibers. The resulting hydrophobic effect provides excellent barrier properties to liquid water while being fully compatible with paper sustainability.

 

“We show that the application potential of chromatografting may be extended to grease and gases barrier thanks to the prior coating of specific polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH or PVA) layers. We further show that the barrier properties of chromatografted PVOH layers may be enhanced through the addition of PVOH coated particles that are coined smart reacto­chromatogenic particles.”

 

What this all means is that the company’s basic technology can produce water-resistant paper substrates and, by employing a PVOH-treated substrates preprocess, can add grease and gas barriers to the finished products. Furthermore, using specialized PVOH-coated particles yields even higher barriers.

BT3 is developing three levels of barrier materials that are being developed in the following priority order with ascending barrier properties:

 

1. Fatty acids chromatografted using conventional paper renders it water-resistant;

2. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper adds grease and gas barriers;

3. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper “predecorated” with smart reacto-chromatografting nano/micro particles such as clays, talc or calcium carbonate provide high-barrier protection.

 

 Ambient pressure, high-speed process

 

Fundamental to the whole process is the control of the vapor pressure, which makes it possible to deposit on the surface of paper, at very high speed, an extremely thin layer of molecules of plant origin (fatty acids) and also triggers a reaction to render the paper hydrophobic. BT3′s prototype processing system at the CTP uses a web width of up to 240mm (9 1/2 inches) at a speed to 400 m/min. (1,312 ft/min) to treat a paper weight of 30 to 400 g/m² and a reel diameter of 1,200mm (47 inches). The reaction occurs at ambient pressure at temperatures from 120 to 180° C (248 to 356° F) over a period of one second.

 

Olivier Muquet, BT3 Technologies’ marketing and sales manager, compares the process to printing. “Basically, the process is similar to a printing process: We apply fatty chlorhyde acids in a liquid state onto paper; then we increase the temperature to bring it to a gaseous state. That allows the entire surface of papers to be protected from water because of the direct chemical bond between surface hydroxyls and fatty acids.”

 

The grafting occurs in three dimensions and somewhere between “onto” and “into” the paper substrate, he adds.
Muquet reports that what they are seeing with the technology is the increased performance of cellulosic materials and the reduction in the amount of material (fibers) used: “Our technology protects boards from water and humidity and reduces their thickness. The technology, which can be applied both on roll-to-roll material and also on three-dimensional objects such as molded [pulp], appears very promising.”

 

These sustainable chromatografted materials may also help offset a growing trend toward carbon taxes and related “eco taxes” aimed at complex materials that are difficult to recycle or are non-biodegradable.
Muquet acknowledges that one of the challenges they face is to depose (remove) the PVOH layers without creating pinholes in the high barrier applications.

 

The company has a general strategy related to geography. “Our target markets are first Europe and the U.S., and then we will look to expand worldwide,” he says. “We are looking for local industrial partners for all those markets. To accelerate our growth, we are currently in a fundraising process and are open to discuss U.S. venture capital opportunities.”

 

Muquet tells Packaging Digest the company is currently involved in about 20 developments with industrial partners in different fields including corrugated board packaging.

 

BT3 Technologies, +33 458 001 273.

www.bt3technologies.com

 

TAPPI, 800-332-8686.
www.tappi.org

 

SIDEBAR: Chromatografting: A hybrid of two techniques
As defined by Wikipedia, chromatography is the collective term for a set of laboratory techniques for the separation of mixtures. The mixture is dissolved in a fluid called the mobile phase, which carries it through a structure holding another material called the stationary phase. The various constituents of the mixture travel at different speeds, causing them to separate. The separation is based on differential partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases. A subtle difference in a compound’s partition coefficient result in different retention on the stationary phase thus changing the separation.

Another source puts it far more succinctly: A method to separate the components of a substance for analytical purposes.

Grafting is a horticultural technique whereby tissues from one plant are inserted into those of another so that the two sets of vascular tissues may join together.

BT3′s hybrid version combines these two scientific methods using heat and vapor pressure to graft biosourced fatty acids onto (or into) paper substrates to provide the barrier properties desired. The company claims the solvent-free method maintains the recyclable and biodegradable behavior of the new material.

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‘Chromatografting’ imparts barrier to paper






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A sustainable method from BT3 Technologies of France deposits fatty acids on paper substrates to yield superior barrier properties against moisture and oxygen.


Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/17/2013 6:32:00 PM






 

BT3 Molecules


BT3 Technologies’ self-coined chromatografting (see sidebar at end) technology imparts a barrier to paper substrates using “green chemistry,” taking its inspiration from aquatic birds like ducks and swans that can glide through water without getting soaked. You may never have considered that the secret to waterfowls’ water repellency is hydrophobic (“water hating”) waxes in the form of esters between long-chain alcohols and long-chain fatty acids.

 

Now the start-up company wants to see its technology take flight with the development and commercialization of products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials with these unique properties:

• Water repellence

• Grease repellence

• Gas barrier properties

• Remain recyclable and biodegradable.

 

The company’s main targeted markets are papers and corrugated cases, food packaging and textiles.
What the company’s researchers saw several years ago was a pressing need for the development of new technological solutions that would allow the production of papers and boards with good barrier properties that did not hamper their sustainability characteristics. To this end, the BT3 team has been working for some time on the potential of molecular grafting to achieve barrier properties using cellulosic substrates.

 

In 2010, Cleantech was formed in Grenoble, France, with a six-person staff and backed by 15 years of R&D from the CNRS-CERMAV (www.cermav.cnrs.fr) and with a five year partnership with the French pulp and paper technical center, Centre du Papier Technique (CTP, www.webctp.com). BT3 was formed to develop and sell products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials.

 

Update at TAPPI symposium

 

What has come out of that group is summarized in an abstract for a technical paper that BT3 presented last September at the 12th Technical Assn. of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) Advanced Coating Fundamentals Symposium that provides a good overview into what their development is about: “Cellulose-based products such as papers and boards are exceptionally versatile and attractive materials notably from the point of view of sustainability.

 

“Compared to their plastic film competitors, their application potential is however hampered by their lack of barrier resistance to water, grease and gases. Composite multilayer structures have then to be [developed and produced], with an obvious, strong negative impact on sustainability. Chromatografting (or chromatogeny) has been shown to be able to provide a partial answer to this problem. It involves the molecular grafting of long-chain natural fatty acids upon the external OH groups of cellulosic fibers. The resulting hydrophobic effect provides excellent barrier properties to liquid water while being fully compatible with paper sustainability.

 

“We show that the application potential of chromatografting may be extended to grease and gases barrier thanks to the prior coating of specific polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH or PVA) layers. We further show that the barrier properties of chromatografted PVOH layers may be enhanced through the addition of PVOH coated particles that are coined smart reacto­chromatogenic particles.”

 

What this all means is that the company’s basic technology can produce water-resistant paper substrates and, by employing a PVOH-treated substrates preprocess, can add grease and gas barriers to the finished products. Furthermore, using specialized PVOH-coated particles yields even higher barriers.

BT3 is developing three levels of barrier materials that are being developed in the following priority order with ascending barrier properties:

 

1. Fatty acids chromatografted using conventional paper renders it water-resistant;

2. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper adds grease and gas barriers;

3. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper “predecorated” with smart reacto-chromatografting nano/micro particles such as clays, talc or calcium carbonate provide high-barrier protection.

 

 Ambient pressure, high-speed process

 

Fundamental to the whole process is the control of the vapor pressure, which makes it possible to deposit on the surface of paper, at very high speed, an extremely thin layer of molecules of plant origin (fatty acids) and also triggers a reaction to render the paper hydrophobic. BT3′s prototype processing system at the CTP uses a web width of up to 240mm (9 1/2 inches) at a speed to 400 m/min. (1,312 ft/min) to treat a paper weight of 30 to 400 g/m² and a reel diameter of 1,200mm (47 inches). The reaction occurs at ambient pressure at temperatures from 120 to 180° C (248 to 356° F) over a period of one second.

 

Olivier Muquet, BT3 Technologies’ marketing and sales manager, compares the process to printing. “Basically, the process is similar to a printing process: We apply fatty chlorhyde acids in a liquid state onto paper; then we increase the temperature to bring it to a gaseous state. That allows the entire surface of papers to be protected from water because of the direct chemical bond between surface hydroxyls and fatty acids.”

 

The grafting occurs in three dimensions and somewhere between “onto” and “into” the paper substrate, he adds.
Muquet reports that what they are seeing with the technology is the increased performance of cellulosic materials and the reduction in the amount of material (fibers) used: “Our technology protects boards from water and humidity and reduces their thickness. The technology, which can be applied both on roll-to-roll material and also on three-dimensional objects such as molded [pulp], appears very promising.”

 

These sustainable chromatografted materials may also help offset a growing trend toward carbon taxes and related “eco taxes” aimed at complex materials that are difficult to recycle or are non-biodegradable.
Muquet acknowledges that one of the challenges they face is to depose (remove) the PVOH layers without creating pinholes in the high barrier applications.

 

The company has a general strategy related to geography. “Our target markets are first Europe and the U.S., and then we will look to expand worldwide,” he says. “We are looking for local industrial partners for all those markets. To accelerate our growth, we are currently in a fundraising process and are open to discuss U.S. venture capital opportunities.”

 

Muquet tells Packaging Digest the company is currently involved in about 20 developments with industrial partners in different fields including corrugated board packaging.

 

BT3 Technologies, +33 458 001 273.

www.bt3technologies.com

 

TAPPI, 800-332-8686.
www.tappi.org

 

SIDEBAR: Chromatografting: A hybrid of two techniques
As defined by Wikipedia, chromatography is the collective term for a set of laboratory techniques for the separation of mixtures. The mixture is dissolved in a fluid called the mobile phase, which carries it through a structure holding another material called the stationary phase. The various constituents of the mixture travel at different speeds, causing them to separate. The separation is based on differential partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases. A subtle difference in a compound’s partition coefficient result in different retention on the stationary phase thus changing the separation.

Another source puts it far more succinctly: A method to separate the components of a substance for analytical purposes.

Grafting is a horticultural technique whereby tissues from one plant are inserted into those of another so that the two sets of vascular tissues may join together.

BT3′s hybrid version combines these two scientific methods using heat and vapor pressure to graft biosourced fatty acids onto (or into) paper substrates to provide the barrier properties desired. The company claims the solvent-free method maintains the recyclable and biodegradable behavior of the new material.

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‘Chromatografting’ imparts barrier to paper






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A sustainable method from BT3 Technologies of France deposits fatty acids on paper substrates to yield superior barrier properties against moisture and oxygen.


Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/17/2013 6:32:00 PM






 

BT3 Molecules


BT3 Technologies’ self-coined chromatografting (see sidebar at end) technology imparts a barrier to paper substrates using “green chemistry,” taking its inspiration from aquatic birds like ducks and swans that can glide through water without getting soaked. You may never have considered that the secret to waterfowls’ water repellency is hydrophobic (“water hating”) waxes in the form of esters between long-chain alcohols and long-chain fatty acids.

 

Now the start-up company wants to see its technology take flight with the development and commercialization of products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials with these unique properties:

• Water repellence

• Grease repellence

• Gas barrier properties

• Remain recyclable and biodegradable.

 

The company’s main targeted markets are papers and corrugated cases, food packaging and textiles.
What the company’s researchers saw several years ago was a pressing need for the development of new technological solutions that would allow the production of papers and boards with good barrier properties that did not hamper their sustainability characteristics. To this end, the BT3 team has been working for some time on the potential of molecular grafting to achieve barrier properties using cellulosic substrates.

 

In 2010, Cleantech was formed in Grenoble, France, with a six-person staff and backed by 15 years of R&D from the CNRS-CERMAV (www.cermav.cnrs.fr) and with a five year partnership with the French pulp and paper technical center, Centre du Papier Technique (CTP, www.webctp.com). BT3 was formed to develop and sell products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials.

 

Update at TAPPI symposium

 

What has come out of that group is summarized in an abstract for a technical paper that BT3 presented last September at the 12th Technical Assn. of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) Advanced Coating Fundamentals Symposium that provides a good overview into what their development is about: “Cellulose-based products such as papers and boards are exceptionally versatile and attractive materials notably from the point of view of sustainability.

 

“Compared to their plastic film competitors, their application potential is however hampered by their lack of barrier resistance to water, grease and gases. Composite multilayer structures have then to be [developed and produced], with an obvious, strong negative impact on sustainability. Chromatografting (or chromatogeny) has been shown to be able to provide a partial answer to this problem. It involves the molecular grafting of long-chain natural fatty acids upon the external OH groups of cellulosic fibers. The resulting hydrophobic effect provides excellent barrier properties to liquid water while being fully compatible with paper sustainability.

 

“We show that the application potential of chromatografting may be extended to grease and gases barrier thanks to the prior coating of specific polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH or PVA) layers. We further show that the barrier properties of chromatografted PVOH layers may be enhanced through the addition of PVOH coated particles that are coined smart reacto­chromatogenic particles.”

 

What this all means is that the company’s basic technology can produce water-resistant paper substrates and, by employing a PVOH-treated substrates preprocess, can add grease and gas barriers to the finished products. Furthermore, using specialized PVOH-coated particles yields even higher barriers.

BT3 is developing three levels of barrier materials that are being developed in the following priority order with ascending barrier properties:

 

1. Fatty acids chromatografted using conventional paper renders it water-resistant;

2. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper adds grease and gas barriers;

3. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper “predecorated” with smart reacto-chromatografting nano/micro particles such as clays, talc or calcium carbonate provide high-barrier protection.

 

 Ambient pressure, high-speed process

 

Fundamental to the whole process is the control of the vapor pressure, which makes it possible to deposit on the surface of paper, at very high speed, an extremely thin layer of molecules of plant origin (fatty acids) and also triggers a reaction to render the paper hydrophobic. BT3′s prototype processing system at the CTP uses a web width of up to 240mm (9 1/2 inches) at a speed to 400 m/min. (1,312 ft/min) to treat a paper weight of 30 to 400 g/m² and a reel diameter of 1,200mm (47 inches). The reaction occurs at ambient pressure at temperatures from 120 to 180° C (248 to 356° F) over a period of one second.

 

Olivier Muquet, BT3 Technologies’ marketing and sales manager, compares the process to printing. “Basically, the process is similar to a printing process: We apply fatty chlorhyde acids in a liquid state onto paper; then we increase the temperature to bring it to a gaseous state. That allows the entire surface of papers to be protected from water because of the direct chemical bond between surface hydroxyls and fatty acids.”

 

The grafting occurs in three dimensions and somewhere between “onto” and “into” the paper substrate, he adds.
Muquet reports that what they are seeing with the technology is the increased performance of cellulosic materials and the reduction in the amount of material (fibers) used: “Our technology protects boards from water and humidity and reduces their thickness. The technology, which can be applied both on roll-to-roll material and also on three-dimensional objects such as molded [pulp], appears very promising.”

 

These sustainable chromatografted materials may also help offset a growing trend toward carbon taxes and related “eco taxes” aimed at complex materials that are difficult to recycle or are non-biodegradable.
Muquet acknowledges that one of the challenges they face is to depose (remove) the PVOH layers without creating pinholes in the high barrier applications.

 

The company has a general strategy related to geography. “Our target markets are first Europe and the U.S., and then we will look to expand worldwide,” he says. “We are looking for local industrial partners for all those markets. To accelerate our growth, we are currently in a fundraising process and are open to discuss U.S. venture capital opportunities.”

 

Muquet tells Packaging Digest the company is currently involved in about 20 developments with industrial partners in different fields including corrugated board packaging.

 

BT3 Technologies, +33 458 001 273.

www.bt3technologies.com

 

TAPPI, 800-332-8686.
www.tappi.org

 

SIDEBAR: Chromatografting: A hybrid of two techniques
As defined by Wikipedia, chromatography is the collective term for a set of laboratory techniques for the separation of mixtures. The mixture is dissolved in a fluid called the mobile phase, which carries it through a structure holding another material called the stationary phase. The various constituents of the mixture travel at different speeds, causing them to separate. The separation is based on differential partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases. A subtle difference in a compound’s partition coefficient result in different retention on the stationary phase thus changing the separation.

Another source puts it far more succinctly: A method to separate the components of a substance for analytical purposes.

Grafting is a horticultural technique whereby tissues from one plant are inserted into those of another so that the two sets of vascular tissues may join together.

BT3′s hybrid version combines these two scientific methods using heat and vapor pressure to graft biosourced fatty acids onto (or into) paper substrates to provide the barrier properties desired. The company claims the solvent-free method maintains the recyclable and biodegradable behavior of the new material.

.







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523421-_Chromatografting_imparts_barrier_to_paper.php?rssid=20538

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‘Chromatografting’ imparts barrier to paper






RSS

Reprints/License

Print

Email









A sustainable method from BT3 Technologies of France deposits fatty acids on paper substrates to yield superior barrier properties against moisture and oxygen.


Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/17/2013 6:32:00 PM






 

BT3 Molecules


BT3 Technologies’ self-coined chromatografting (see sidebar at end) technology imparts a barrier to paper substrates using “green chemistry,” taking its inspiration from aquatic birds like ducks and swans that can glide through water without getting soaked. You may never have considered that the secret to waterfowls’ water repellency is hydrophobic (“water hating”) waxes in the form of esters between long-chain alcohols and long-chain fatty acids.

 

Now the start-up company wants to see its technology take flight with the development and commercialization of products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials with these unique properties:

• Water repellence

• Grease repellence

• Gas barrier properties

• Remain recyclable and biodegradable.

 

The company’s main targeted markets are papers and corrugated cases, food packaging and textiles.
What the company’s researchers saw several years ago was a pressing need for the development of new technological solutions that would allow the production of papers and boards with good barrier properties that did not hamper their sustainability characteristics. To this end, the BT3 team has been working for some time on the potential of molecular grafting to achieve barrier properties using cellulosic substrates.

 

In 2010, Cleantech was formed in Grenoble, France, with a six-person staff and backed by 15 years of R&D from the CNRS-CERMAV (www.cermav.cnrs.fr) and with a five year partnership with the French pulp and paper technical center, Centre du Papier Technique (CTP, www.webctp.com). BT3 was formed to develop and sell products and processes of green chemistry dedicated to cellulosic materials.

 

Update at TAPPI symposium

 

What has come out of that group is summarized in an abstract for a technical paper that BT3 presented last September at the 12th Technical Assn. of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) Advanced Coating Fundamentals Symposium that provides a good overview into what their development is about: “Cellulose-based products such as papers and boards are exceptionally versatile and attractive materials notably from the point of view of sustainability.

 

“Compared to their plastic film competitors, their application potential is however hampered by their lack of barrier resistance to water, grease and gases. Composite multilayer structures have then to be [developed and produced], with an obvious, strong negative impact on sustainability. Chromatografting (or chromatogeny) has been shown to be able to provide a partial answer to this problem. It involves the molecular grafting of long-chain natural fatty acids upon the external OH groups of cellulosic fibers. The resulting hydrophobic effect provides excellent barrier properties to liquid water while being fully compatible with paper sustainability.

 

“We show that the application potential of chromatografting may be extended to grease and gases barrier thanks to the prior coating of specific polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH or PVA) layers. We further show that the barrier properties of chromatografted PVOH layers may be enhanced through the addition of PVOH coated particles that are coined smart reacto­chromatogenic particles.”

 

What this all means is that the company’s basic technology can produce water-resistant paper substrates and, by employing a PVOH-treated substrates preprocess, can add grease and gas barriers to the finished products. Furthermore, using specialized PVOH-coated particles yields even higher barriers.

BT3 is developing three levels of barrier materials that are being developed in the following priority order with ascending barrier properties:

 

1. Fatty acids chromatografted using conventional paper renders it water-resistant;

2. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper adds grease and gas barriers;

3. Fatty acids chromatografted using PVOH paper “predecorated” with smart reacto-chromatografting nano/micro particles such as clays, talc or calcium carbonate provide high-barrier protection.

 

 Ambient pressure, high-speed process

 

Fundamental to the whole process is the control of the vapor pressure, which makes it possible to deposit on the surface of paper, at very high speed, an extremely thin layer of molecules of plant origin (fatty acids) and also triggers a reaction to render the paper hydrophobic. BT3′s prototype processing system at the CTP uses a web width of up to 240mm (9 1/2 inches) at a speed to 400 m/min. (1,312 ft/min) to treat a paper weight of 30 to 400 g/m² and a reel diameter of 1,200mm (47 inches). The reaction occurs at ambient pressure at temperatures from 120 to 180° C (248 to 356° F) over a period of one second.

 

Olivier Muquet, BT3 Technologies’ marketing and sales manager, compares the process to printing. “Basically, the process is similar to a printing process: We apply fatty chlorhyde acids in a liquid state onto paper; then we increase the temperature to bring it to a gaseous state. That allows the entire surface of papers to be protected from water because of the direct chemical bond between surface hydroxyls and fatty acids.”

 

The grafting occurs in three dimensions and somewhere between “onto” and “into” the paper substrate, he adds.
Muquet reports that what they are seeing with the technology is the increased performance of cellulosic materials and the reduction in the amount of material (fibers) used: “Our technology protects boards from water and humidity and reduces their thickness. The technology, which can be applied both on roll-to-roll material and also on three-dimensional objects such as molded [pulp], appears very promising.”

 

These sustainable chromatografted materials may also help offset a growing trend toward carbon taxes and related “eco taxes” aimed at complex materials that are difficult to recycle or are non-biodegradable.
Muquet acknowledges that one of the challenges they face is to depose (remove) the PVOH layers without creating pinholes in the high barrier applications.

 

The company has a general strategy related to geography. “Our target markets are first Europe and the U.S., and then we will look to expand worldwide,” he says. “We are looking for local industrial partners for all those markets. To accelerate our growth, we are currently in a fundraising process and are open to discuss U.S. venture capital opportunities.”

 

Muquet tells Packaging Digest the company is currently involved in about 20 developments with industrial partners in different fields including corrugated board packaging.

 

BT3 Technologies, +33 458 001 273.

www.bt3technologies.com

 

TAPPI, 800-332-8686.
www.tappi.org

 

SIDEBAR: Chromatografting: A hybrid of two techniques
As defined by Wikipedia, chromatography is the collective term for a set of laboratory techniques for the separation of mixtures. The mixture is dissolved in a fluid called the mobile phase, which carries it through a structure holding another material called the stationary phase. The various constituents of the mixture travel at different speeds, causing them to separate. The separation is based on differential partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases. A subtle difference in a compound’s partition coefficient result in different retention on the stationary phase thus changing the separation.

Another source puts it far more succinctly: A method to separate the components of a substance for analytical purposes.

Grafting is a horticultural technique whereby tissues from one plant are inserted into those of another so that the two sets of vascular tissues may join together.

BT3′s hybrid version combines these two scientific methods using heat and vapor pressure to graft biosourced fatty acids onto (or into) paper substrates to provide the barrier properties desired. The company claims the solvent-free method maintains the recyclable and biodegradable behavior of the new material.

.







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Sealed Air Brings Fresh Clarity to Lightweight Cryovac PP Chilled Food Packaging with Millad NX 8000

Sealed Air Corporation is offering a range of lightweight polypropylene (PP) trays and pots with high clarity for chilled foods thanks to Milliken’s clarifying innovation Millad NX 8000. Sealed Air’s choice of Millad NX 8000 to up the clarity benchmark of its thermoformed Cryovac lidded trays and pots for meats, salads and other fresh produce, means food processors can benefit from the reduced packaging weight and lower carbon footprint of PP compared to alternative materials without comprising on packaging transparency or performance.

Due to its low density, PP packaging is typically 10 – 30% lighter and has a 24% lower carbon footprint than APET, for example, while offering the same strength and rigidity (Source: Intertek). Less material usage contributes to less post-consumer waste production too. Sealed Air’s Cryovac containers are non-brittle and break without sharp edges. The inherent higher heat resistance of PP trays and containers allows them to be reheated and also laminated in heat-sealing machinery without cracking or warping. PP is readily recyclable and straightforward to separate from other materials in the recycling chain, lending itself to re-use as food packaging or, through energy recovery, as a valuable source of energy.

Sealed Air’s customers have responded favorably to the company’s success in moving the clarity standard of its PP packaging upwards. By using Millad NX 8000, Sealed Air has also benefited from processing advantages in its production chain.

“Conventional clarifying agents don’t dissolve or disperse well in PP and this can cause a build-up on machinery during processing,” comments Michael Thomson, Sealed Air. “New generation Millad NX 8000 on the other hand is easy to process. This further plus point for the clarifier adds to its significant achievement in raising the clarity standard of our polypropylene applications for the food sector.”

Milliken provided technical support and the right solution to help Sealed Air achieve optimum clarity and offer the highly-demanding food industry a competitive packaging alternative to support producers in meeting UK and European guidelines regarding reduction in packaging weight, waste and CO₂ emissions.

Sami T.K. Palanisami, marketing and sales manager plastic additives EMEA, Milliken, adds: “High clarity polypropylene helps food producers create an appealing fresh-look for packaged foods. It also brings the valuable environmental advantage of lighter packaging with a low carbon footprint during production and transportation, achieving a combination of benefits that is not possible with other materials.”

About Milliken
Milliken is an innovation company that has been exploring, discovering, and creating ways to enhance people’s lives since 1865. Working from our laboratories, application and development centers around the world, our scientists and engineers create coatings, specialty chemicals, and advanced additive and colorant technologies that transform the way we experience products from automotive plastics to children’s art supplies. With expertise across a breadth of disciplines that also includes floor covering and performance materials, the people of Milliken work every day to add true value to people’s lives, improve health and safety, and make this world more sustainable.

About Sealed Air
Sealed Air is a global leader in food safety and security, facility hygiene and product protection. With widely recognized and inventive brands such as Bubble Wrap brand cushioning, Cryovac brand food packaging solutions and Diversey brand cleaning and hygiene solutions, Sealed Air offers efficient and sustainable solutions that create business value for customers, enhance the quality of life for consumers and provide a cleaner and healthier environment for future generations. Sealed Air generated revenue of approximately $7.6 billion in 2012, and has approximately 25,000 employees who serve customers in 175 countries.

Millad is a registered trademark of Milliken & Company.

NX is a trademark of Milliken & Company.

Milliken is a registered trademark of Milliken & Company.

Cryovac is a registered trademark of Cryovac Inc., a subsidiary of Sealed Air Corporation

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Global market for advanced packaging is growing






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Posted by Jack Mans, Plant Operations Editor — Packaging Digest, 5/28/2013 3:46:34 PM





The global market for advanced packaging solutions that includes active, controlled, intelligent packaging, and advanced packaging components was at $31.4 billion in 2011, according to a report from BCC Research entitled Active, Controlled, and Intelligent Packaging for Foods and Beverages — Focus on Active Packaging.

The market growth looks promising and the overall market value for 2017 is projected to be nearly $44.3 billion after increasing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.8%. The market was dominated by controlled packaging, which had sales of nearly $12.4 billion in 2011. The expected CAGR for controlled packaging is 6% from 2012 through 2017, resulting in a projected market value of $17.6 billion in 2017. Active packaging was next in market sharB - Global- rrr.JPGe in 2011 with nearly $8.8 billion in sales; the anticipated CAGR for this segment of advanced packaging is 5.2%, leading to a market value of $11.9 billion in 2017. Advanced packaging components accounted for $6.5 billion of sales in 2011, and the market value for 2017 for this segment is expected to be at around $9.4 billion after rising at a 6.3% CAGR.

The intelligent packaging sales were nearly $3.8 billion in 2011 and could approach $5.3 billion in 2017 with a CAGR 5.6%. 

Consumer packaging is a vital component of contemporary living today, with food and beverage packaging making up the largest segment. Key megatrends, such as upgraded standard of living and demand for safety, convenience, health, well-being, and sustainability are creating long-term shifts affecting consumers’ lives, eating habits, and purchasing behaviors across many different markets, regions and demographics. These shifts, which started a decade or so ago, have forced a constant change of behavior in their manifestation. Globalization has had a tremendous effect as well on the regional markets; however, trends are to some extent also influenced by regional cultures, depending on the progress of the market in question. 

Companies engaged in manufacturing and selling food and beverage packaging must adhere as necessary to whatever regulations are in place or devised. Consumer acceptance is another key factor that manufacturers, retailers, and others involved in the industry should consider. For example, a sudden change in the regular packaging of a product such as meat or poultry might influence consumers’ purchasing of the product. Thus, the company that suddenly introduces a different packaging medium would have to provide detailed and relevant information to foster consumer acceptance of the new packaging. 

The increasing consumer demand for fresh and unaltered food has driven the integration of active packaging in the food and beverages industry. Active packaging uses a variety of techniques. Regional markets for active packaging of food and beverages have grown due to consumer preference for minimally processed foods that employ minimal or no preservatives. The convergence of global factors such as eating habits, health awareness, stress factors due to an overnight work culture, stricter regulations on food safety, and others have added to the transformation of food packaging. These factors have driven the growth of active packaging techniques in all regions.

Controlled packaging of food and beverages in the regional markets grew well during the examined period of 2010 to 2012. There is an expectation of sustained growth for controlled packaging in all regions, since the packaging techniques are focused primarily on retaining the freshness of everyday consumable products such as fresh produce (fruits and vegetables), dairy products, and other preprocessed foods for a particular segment of people.
The intelligent packaging market across all regions – North America, Europe, and emerging markets – increased substantially from 2010 to 2012 and is expected to sustain this growth for the next four to five years. A number of portentous activities, such as collaborative efforts and new product development in the Asia-Pacific region as well as in the European and North American markets, were witnessed.

Global Markets for Active, Controlled and Intelligent Packaging for Foods and Beverages (FOD038C) covers the market for active, controlled, and intelligent packaging, including advanced packaging components. BCC’s analysis includes an evaluation of the market and market breakdowns (including by region and by application) for each advanced packaging type; a breakdown of the market into subcategories as the available data allows; market forecasting; and examination of regulatory aspects, innovations, challenges, patent details, market leaders, and market share of individual packaging types. In addition, the study discusses scientific advances, consumer behaviors, and market vibrancy. 

Market data is presented to show global market trends and growth. Data are statistically validated for present and future predictions. 

Source and publisher: BCC Research LLC, 49 Walnut Park, Building 2, Wellesley, MA 02481, Telephone: 866-285-7215; Email: editor@bccresearch.com.

Active, Controlled, and Intelligent Packaging for Foods and Beverages( FOD038C)

Target Date: May 2013 Price: $5450.00







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