PureCircle announces ambitious 2020 sustainability goals






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Posted by Jack Mans, Plant Operations Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/12/2013 9:23:32 AM





PureCircle, a leading producer and marketer of high puC - daily - PureCircle_logo.jpegrity stevia products, announced today that it has expanded its Sustainability program and set an ambitious 2020 goal to reduce carbon, water, waste and energy use across its supply chain from farm to sweetener.

These goals mark a significant commitment to making a positive impact on the food and beverage industry’s environmental footprint and helping to tackle the global obesity challenge. PureCircle’s efforts will enable a cumulative reduction of the food & beverage industries’:

       • Carbon emissions by one million metric tons by 2020
       • Water consumption by two trillion liters by 2020
       • Calories in global diets by 13 trillion by 2020

 

When setting these ambitious commitments, PureCircle drew from the industry leading work it has undertaken to measure its carbon and water footprint. PureCircle was the first in the stevia industry to measure and publish results of the carbon and water footprint from farm to sweetener.

 

In Fiscal 2012, it completed its second carbon footprint, which together with the 2011 study formed the basis for the 2020 goals. These goals show that PureCircle stevia has a significantly lower environmental footprint than other natural mainstream sweeteners (high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), beet and cane sugar) based on publically available benchmarks.

 

Building on the progress the company has already made to reduce its carbon emissions and water use, the 2020 goals layout PureCircle’s commitments to have zero untreated waste to landfill and support 100,000 farmers by 2020. PureCircle‘s own vertically integrated supply chain, allows for innovation and traceability from farm to final stevia ingredient.

 

Ajay Chandran, Global Marketing and Sustainability Director said: “It is PureCircle’s vision to lead the global expansion of stevia as the next mass volume natural sweetener that is grown, processed and delivered in a way that respects people and the planet. Our 2020 goals, published today, demonstrate this vision in action. Our customers and consumers can be assured of our long-term commitment to further embedding sustainability principles and practices across our integrated supply chain, which will result in improved products with a reduced impact.

 

“As the world’s largest stevia producer and supplier, we recognize the unique role we can play in helping the food and beverage industry to reduce its impact on the environment and tackle the global obesity challenge, with our goals articulating the significant role we can play in this respect.”

The 2020 goals serve as an important next step in PureCircle’s sustainability journey, following the company’s publication of its Sustainability Commitment in 2011 and first Carbon and Water Footprint in 2012.

 

To learn more about PureCircle’s 2020 Sustainability Goals, visit: http://purecircle.com/company/corporate-social-responsibility/our-2020-sustainability-goals







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P&W Weighs in on the Future of Fresh & Easy

Close watchers of the grocery industry may have learned that Tesco is undertaking a strategic review of Fresh & Easy to assess its future under Tesco’s stewardship. It was a bold brand experiment never attempted before—on many levels. U.K.-based grocery giant Tesco came to America with a concept ahead of its time.

The concept was a new brand for this retailer offering convenient, better-for-you prepared foods, fresh produce and common staples brought to local neighborhoods. Tesco planned a first-phase rollout of over 200 innovative Fresh & Easy markets in California, Arizona and Nevada over six years. They invested in an aggressive private label strategy with sophisticated branding and package design. They enlisted London-based design agency P&W to create a solid, flexible brand foundation that could expand into dozens of category-specific directions. Working in collaboration with the Deutsch advertising agency in L.A., the new brand was born.

The best faces forward
Fresh & Easy launched with 1000+ “all-natural” private label products; within four years, that increased to 3000+. The heavy emphasis on private label meant the strategy for implementation was storewide. Products ranged from everyday core products to specialty kids foods to premium adult indulgence.

All Fresh & Easy products adhered to comprehensive food safety regulations. Beyond that, strict food policies of no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives—as well as no high fructose corn syrup or trans fats in any of their private label products—were set to revolutionize the U.S. market.

Focusing on values of honesty, good quality, simplicity, and health-consciousness, we created a fresh, uncluttered consumer experience that would engender loyalty to Fresh & Easy products.

The philosophies that guided the extensive Fresh & Easy design work were attended to with great thoughtfulness. P&W’s loving dedication as brand guardians, and the ability to remain creatively agile, made for a fruitful client/agency relationship.

Brand value = business value
Fresh & Easy’s brand promise goes beyond consistent quality to continual improvement. Recipes are reviewed and refined, healthier ingredients are sourced, and salt content is reduced whenever possible.

Fresh & Easy is innovative in a number of ways. From a product development standpoint, the brand introduced the U.S. to “facts up front,” a nutrition labeling system that brings key aspects of the nutrition panel from the back of package to the front. At the time it was implemented on Fresh & Easy products, similar systems were in place in the U.K. A voluntary labeling system is now gaining substantial momentum in the U.S.

Fresh & Easy skillfully managed to introduce innovation after innovation, from the aggressive new product development (NPD) program for private label to the intuitive self-checkout stations. Both of these are now a big part of competitors’ models.

Even though the package designs have been recognized dozens of times in graphic design awards programs, as well as by the DBA Design Effectiveness Awards program, the most important measure of the designs’ success has been customers’ positive reactions—and loyalty.

Private label revolution
Over the last 10 years, private label in the U.S. has ushered in a new way to think about store brands. Private label brands are now managed in a similar way to long-dominant national brands.

The success of private label campaigns relies on consistent quality. The parent brand contains the brand promise. Fresh & Easy starts with its name as a brand promise. The “Fresh” part is self-explanatory. The “Easy” part can be interpreted several ways, including “convenient” and “time-saving.” These elements co-exist in the logo’s clock-apple device affectionately known as the “clapple.”

Other retailers have taken note of these changes in consumer habits and invested heavily in their own private label programs in recent years. They do say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery!

“Walgreens Spikes Private Label Market Share”
“We’re seeing significant momentum in our private brands,” said president and CEO Gregory Wasson. “We’ve invested heavily in our own brands, including Walgreens, Delish, Nice! and many more, and year-over-year private brand penetration in our front-end sales improved 200 basis points to 22%.”
Source: Store Brands Decisions

Revolutionizing the U.S. retail world was no mean ambition, but perhaps the slow burn of it was not quick enough for this fast-paced retailer. Many signs indicate that the brand is living and growing. Just not fast enough, it seems.

Whatever the future holds for F&E, we hope that the brand and stores can be sold intact, so that the Fresh & Easy can mature to its fullest potential. We are proud to be a part of such a unique experience with a revolutionary company and hope to continue our work with this innovative brand.

Leading With Core Values
Fresh & Easy sought to avoid messy brand extensions by developing clean, clear brand guidelines that build value and maintain equity. Launching with clear, uncomplicated food packaging centered around six key principles:

  • Being Fresh: Selling fresh, high-quality goods at affordable prices.
  • Being Easy: Easy to shop, easy to use. One of the most dedicated strategies was incorporating resealability in as many categories as possible, to eliminate bag clips and avoid stale, ruined food.
  • Being Transparent: Whenever possible, Fresh & Easy packaging showcases the food inside. Having nothing to hide builds trust with customers.
  • Leading with Private Label: Committing to being better than national brands, making Fresh & Easy private label food the hero, and being the best of the best.
  • Displaying Efficiencies: Fresh & Easy promoted the use of retail-ready and display-ready packaging that enables one-touch replenishment.
  • Simplifying: Reducing clutter, organizing SKUs, and stripping down the retail environment all help customers find what they want easily.

P&W was founded in 1987 by current directors Adrian Whitefoord and Simon Pemberton. The company has offices in London and Los Angeles, and services clients around the world, including Tesco, Ferrero and Healthy Food Brands in the UK, Fresh & Easy in the USA and Seicomart in Japan.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

P&W Weighs in on the Future of Fresh & Easy

Close watchers of the grocery industry may have learned that Tesco is undertaking a strategic review of Fresh & Easy to assess its future under Tesco’s stewardship. It was a bold brand experiment never attempted before—on many levels. U.K.-based grocery giant Tesco came to America with a concept ahead of its time.

The concept was a new brand for this retailer offering convenient, better-for-you prepared foods, fresh produce and common staples brought to local neighborhoods. Tesco planned a first-phase rollout of over 200 innovative Fresh & Easy markets in California, Arizona and Nevada over six years. They invested in an aggressive private label strategy with sophisticated branding and package design. They enlisted London-based design agency P&W to create a solid, flexible brand foundation that could expand into dozens of category-specific directions. Working in collaboration with the Deutsch advertising agency in L.A., the new brand was born.

The best faces forward
Fresh & Easy launched with 1000+ “all-natural” private label products; within four years, that increased to 3000+. The heavy emphasis on private label meant the strategy for implementation was storewide. Products ranged from everyday core products to specialty kids foods to premium adult indulgence.

All Fresh & Easy products adhered to comprehensive food safety regulations. Beyond that, strict food policies of no artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives—as well as no high fructose corn syrup or trans fats in any of their private label products—were set to revolutionize the U.S. market.

Focusing on values of honesty, good quality, simplicity, and health-consciousness, we created a fresh, uncluttered consumer experience that would engender loyalty to Fresh & Easy products.

The philosophies that guided the extensive Fresh & Easy design work were attended to with great thoughtfulness. P&W’s loving dedication as brand guardians, and the ability to remain creatively agile, made for a fruitful client/agency relationship.

Brand value = business value
Fresh & Easy’s brand promise goes beyond consistent quality to continual improvement. Recipes are reviewed and refined, healthier ingredients are sourced, and salt content is reduced whenever possible.

Fresh & Easy is innovative in a number of ways. From a product development standpoint, the brand introduced the U.S. to “facts up front,” a nutrition labeling system that brings key aspects of the nutrition panel from the back of package to the front. At the time it was implemented on Fresh & Easy products, similar systems were in place in the U.K. A voluntary labeling system is now gaining substantial momentum in the U.S.

Fresh & Easy skillfully managed to introduce innovation after innovation, from the aggressive new product development (NPD) program for private label to the intuitive self-checkout stations. Both of these are now a big part of competitors’ models.

Even though the package designs have been recognized dozens of times in graphic design awards programs, as well as by the DBA Design Effectiveness Awards program, the most important measure of the designs’ success has been customers’ positive reactions—and loyalty.

Private label revolution
Over the last 10 years, private label in the U.S. has ushered in a new way to think about store brands. Private label brands are now managed in a similar way to long-dominant national brands.

The success of private label campaigns relies on consistent quality. The parent brand contains the brand promise. Fresh & Easy starts with its name as a brand promise. The “Fresh” part is self-explanatory. The “Easy” part can be interpreted several ways, including “convenient” and “time-saving.” These elements co-exist in the logo’s clock-apple device affectionately known as the “clapple.”

Other retailers have taken note of these changes in consumer habits and invested heavily in their own private label programs in recent years. They do say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery!

“Walgreens Spikes Private Label Market Share”
“We’re seeing significant momentum in our private brands,” said president and CEO Gregory Wasson. “We’ve invested heavily in our own brands, including Walgreens, Delish, Nice! and many more, and year-over-year private brand penetration in our front-end sales improved 200 basis points to 22%.”
Source: Store Brands Decisions

Revolutionizing the U.S. retail world was no mean ambition, but perhaps the slow burn of it was not quick enough for this fast-paced retailer. Many signs indicate that the brand is living and growing. Just not fast enough, it seems.

Whatever the future holds for F&E, we hope that the brand and stores can be sold intact, so that the Fresh & Easy can mature to its fullest potential. We are proud to be a part of such a unique experience with a revolutionary company and hope to continue our work with this innovative brand.

Leading With Core Values
Fresh & Easy sought to avoid messy brand extensions by developing clean, clear brand guidelines that build value and maintain equity. Launching with clear, uncomplicated food packaging centered around six key principles:

  • Being Fresh: Selling fresh, high-quality goods at affordable prices.
  • Being Easy: Easy to shop, easy to use. One of the most dedicated strategies was incorporating resealability in as many categories as possible, to eliminate bag clips and avoid stale, ruined food.
  • Being Transparent: Whenever possible, Fresh & Easy packaging showcases the food inside. Having nothing to hide builds trust with customers.
  • Leading with Private Label: Committing to being better than national brands, making Fresh & Easy private label food the hero, and being the best of the best.
  • Displaying Efficiencies: Fresh & Easy promoted the use of retail-ready and display-ready packaging that enables one-touch replenishment.
  • Simplifying: Reducing clutter, organizing SKUs, and stripping down the retail environment all help customers find what they want easily.

P&W was founded in 1987 by current directors Adrian Whitefoord and Simon Pemberton. The company has offices in London and Los Angeles, and services clients around the world, including Tesco, Ferrero and Healthy Food Brands in the UK, Fresh & Easy in the USA and Seicomart in Japan.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,