Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Source Article from http://www.packagingdigest.com/article/523178-Consumers_take_responsibility_for_green_actions_.php?rssid=20538

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Consumers take responsibility for ‘green’ actions…






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/3/2013 4:11:07 PM





Cone Study

 

Earth Day may be just around the corner, but consumers are buying with an eye toward “green” all year long. A record-high 71 percent of Americans consider the environment when they shop, up from 66 percent in 2008. Additionally, nearly half (45 percent) of consumers actively seek out environmental information about the products they buy, according to the five-year benchmark of the 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker.

 

Accountability versus action

 

Even as “green” becomes increasingly top of mind, Americans still struggle with their role in the lifecycle of products with an environmental benefit. Nine-in-10 said they believe it’s their responsibility to properly use and dispose of these products, but action isn’t aligning with intent:

 

  • Only 30 percent say they often use products in a way that achieves the intended environmental benefit
  • 42 percent say they dispose of products in a way that fulfills the intended environmental benefit

 

Despite the lack of consistent follow-through, consumers are showing an inclination to learn more. Americans report they regularly read and follow instructions on how to properly use (71 percent) or dispose (66 percent) of a product. Forty-one percent said they perform additional research to determine how best to utilize and discard a product for maximum benefit.

 

Closing the gap: access and communications

Nearly all respondents (85 percent) want companies to educate them on how to properly use and dispose of products. But they identify significant barriers to doing so, as well. One-third of consumers (33 percent) cited not having the adequate resources, such as disposal bins and community access, as the primary reason for not disposing or using products as intended, while 20 percent stated they simply do not know how to do so.

Consumer understanding of environmental messages also presents an obstacle. Although more than 60 percent of respondents say they understand the environmental terms companies use in their advertising, the majority continue to erroneously believe common expressions such as “green” or “environmentally friendly” mean a product has a positive (40 percent) or neutral (22 percent) impact on the environment. Fewer were able to correctly identify these terms as meaning the product has a lighter impact than other similar products (22 percent) or less than it used to (2 percent). Despite the attention given to product development and environmental marketing, consumer misunderstanding of “green” claims has remained flat at around 60 percent since 2008.

 

“The new green gap is about consumers only taking the idea of responsibility so far, despite feeling responsible for proper use and disposal,” says Liz Gorman, Cone Communications’ senior vice president of Sustainable Business Practices. “They’re buying with the environment in mind, but they rely on companies to provide access and education to truly ‘close the loop.'”

 

Honesty and clarity trump perfection

Almost three-quarters (71 percent) of consumers wish companies would do a better job helping them understand environmental terms. Although they feel overwhelmed by the volume of messages in the marketplace, consumers prioritize authenticity over perfection and will punish companies if they feel misled:

  • 48 percent say they are overwhelmed by environmental messages
  • 69 percent say it’s okay if a company is not environmentally perfect as long as it is honest
  • 78 percent say they will boycott a product if they discover an environmental claim to be misleading

 

When it comes to finding those environmental messages, consumers are primarily looking on the product itself, signaling prime real estate for companies looking to communicate important environmental information:

  • 45 percent say they are most likely to use on-pack resources for information about how to properly use and dispose of environmental products
  • 26 percent say they are most likely to use an online search

 

“Consumers are ready to follow through on the intended use or disposal of environmentally preferred products, but they need companies’ help,” Gorman explains. “This is the next evolution of environmental marketing. Clear and candid communication can ensure consumers understand the important role they play in minimizing the impacts associated with the product’s lifecycle.”

 

About the Research
The 2013 Cone Communications Green Gap Trend Tracker presents the findings of an online survey conducted March 7-10, 2013 by ORC International among a demographically representative sample of 1,068 adults, comprising 552 men and 516 women 18 years of age and older. The margin of error associated with a sample of this size is ± 3 percent at a 95 percent level of confidence. Some figures may not add up to 100 percent due to rounding.

 

Source: Cone Communications

 

 







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Delhi Tour Agencies: Avail amazing tour package

Delhi Tour Agencies: Avail amazing tour package

Budding up of many touring agencies give clear vision that travel industry is shinning. Number of packages are designed letting explore tourists’ India.

Traveling has always been people’s top priority. We all love to unlock new places and spots. Exploring unseen destinations and getting close to smart destinations always rule our minds. Humans crave to travel and learn about new places.

People from far off places visit to new places and spots. Traveler have high inclination to explore the new destinations. Travel industry is booming because and new benchmarks have been achieved. Travelers are great source of revenue for a country. Even many earn and this mark as major source of income.

Country like India support many tourists’ destinations and travelers in big number come to the place to get introduced to the beautiful and unique places. People in India are highly dependent on the tourists’ activities and form the great source of income from them. Flourished and coming up touring agencies really proves that travel industry has really done wonders in the life of unemployed.

Delhi is the pivot when tourist visit India, the state is national capital housing amazing options. Housing galore of ease and convenience, the state also posses oodles of charm and potentials which enrapture travelers from every nook of the world. People from every corner world visit to Delhi and then leave for other cities and tourists destinations. Delhi tour agency can be easily located which are  into designing of versatile and flexible touring packages.

Delhi tour agencies cater the need of diverse travelers and fabricate wonderful holiday packages for any Indian cities. India boast many places which are ideal for spending vacations. Besides, the beautiful demographic of the country lends amazing pleasure and also smart weather. Touring agencies in Delhi provide smart holiday packages for spending beautiful vacations.

India have dedicated ample of space for the survival of wildlife. Beautiful variety of flora and fauna are  budding in various cities. Wildlife tour packages take visitors to the enthralling nature letting a view to get introduce to the various animals. Tigers, Leopards, crocodile, elephants, deer etc can be closely looked in safe way with the wildlife tour package. Travelers and visitors really relish the charm of the various animals and birds sanctuaries which are situated in India. Wildlife tour package can really take you close to the nature and memory of lifetime can be earned.

Golden quadrilateral tour is another wonderful package which are designed to make tourists aware about the beauties which are located in different cities of India. This package is amazingly designed to cater varied interests of the tourists.

Another highly revered touring package is Kashmir tour package. This state is once quoted as heaven on Earth due to the bewitching beauty and charm. The place is highly magnetic and grabs travelers’  attention. Travelers love the Kashmir tour because of the natural beauty which is present there.

Interests’ of tourists are incrementing which is due to the hard efforts of government and people associated with this domain. Many holiday packages are designed to capture the interests of the guests visiting India.

Author Bio:-
Jack Smith is well known writter of delhi tour travel, kashmir tour package and golden quadrilateral tour. He has written many book and article on delhi tourism, palace on wheel tour rajasthan, wildlife tour packages, palace on wheel tour and delhi tour agency.

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Effortlessly Ethical, Your Bread & Butter

Effortlessly Ethical, Your Bread & Butter

Hello and welcome to the first of my Effortlessly Ethical articles.

If you want to live doing the most good and least harm possible to our planet but are confused about how, or it all seems too much hard work, then you will love these articles. What is best – Organic or fair-trade products? Should we buy locally and support our farm shops or try to buy from poorer countries that obviously desperately need our support? What about the carbon footprint our food creates?

‘m Gemma Thompson, a business and personal coach specializing in growing ‘green’ businesses, ‘greening’ businesses and helping individuals live in a more sustainable fashion. I’ve faced the same confusions, and often still do! Obviously I don’t expect to live exactly the way I do, but hopefully by sharing what I’ve found with you I can help you find easy solutions that work for you in your life. As there are so many different angles to look at in food alone I’ve decided to keep these articles short and sweet and look at just one little section at a time. So this first one deals with our bread and butter – literally!

Bread & Butter

This was an area of total confusion to me a while ago but then I found www.ethicalconsumer.org which even contains a handy table scoring different products ethically taking all factors imaginable into account. Perfect for when you don’t have the time or inclination to bake your own bread. So what are our supermarket choices? These days it’s relatively easy to buy organic bread in your local supermarket, if you prefer sliced you can get it sliced there or think about buying Warburton’s organic, this is one of the highest scoring widely available breads according to the good people at ethical consumer magazine.

There are more ethical breads, but these are not so easy to get. Or see if you have local bakers you can support, many of these do their own organic bread and you have the added benefit of it being packaged in a nice biodegradable brown paper bag rather than the plastic that mass produced brands come in. As for me, I’ve started baking my own bread again, at first this wasn’t easy just because it was so time consuming but I recently found a recipe that suggested leaving the dough to rise overnight slowly in the fridge – genius!! Now I can start preparing it before bed and not have so much to do in the morning when I am typically a little too busy to start baking bread. If you want to start baking your own but are hampered by time why not try doing it on the weekends only? If you bake your own bread it’s getting much easier to find organic flour on shelf at your local supermarket, but if you’re not finding it try going online to http://www.dovesfarm.co.uk and check out their list of stockists and don’t forget to mention to your supermarket or shop that you want to be able to buy organic flour from them. As yet I can find no suppliers of Fairtrade flour so it seems best to stick to the organic angle on this one.

Butter though – this really confused me! Should I buy butter or margarine?? Should I buy anchor ‘free range’ that’s been flown from New Zealand? Or maybe English or European butter after all it will have a smaller carbon footprint, won’t it? What about organic butter? And is it true that the palm oil used in so many margarines is causing devastation in South East Asian Countries? So much confusion over such a small thing!

Back to the folks at www.ethicalconsumer.org where I read an excellent article by Lyndsey Whalen called ‘Butter Wouldn’t Melt’ that explained everything to me and of course I could refer to their table for an ‘at a glance’ solution. The highest scoring on this table are still unfortunately harder to find so I have reproduced the top half of the table here to start making your life easier. You can buy online at www.abelandcole.co.uk, or www.goodnessdirect.co.uk, but this can lead to extra delivery miles so as with the flour, don’t be shy to ask you local store to stock it for you, you never know, by doing this you might also help others eat more ethically too!

Brand Rating

Biona organic butter 16.5

Biona organic margarine 16.5

Pure organic vegan margarine 15.5

Suma organic vegan margarine 15.5

Pure vegan margarine 14.5

Suma vegan margarine 14.5

Yeo Valley organic butter 14

Castle Dairies organic butter 13.5

Rachel’s Organic butter 13

Castle Dairies butter 12.5

Country Life organic butter 12

I hope this little run down has helped make it easier for you to be ethical, for more information on anything written here please do check out the links I’ve included, there are many other sources of information out there also and I plan to keep introducing them with my further articles. Some other topics coming up very soon are fruit and veg, local versus fair-trade and the beef on organic meat. But these articles won’t stop there as I also plan to cover subjects like fashion, energy, fitness, transport, technology, gardening, parenting, and the list goes on! To stay on the mailing list for future releases, to see how I can help you or your business or to give me suggestions for future articles please go to www.illuminate-coaching.co.uk or email me at gemma@illuminate-coaching.co.uk. Warm regards Gemma

Gemma Thompson worked in Spa management for more than 10 years.

Through this she gained extensive recruitment and training experience and also spent a lot of time working on various ‘green teams’ to maintain and improve the ethical credentials of the companies she worked for.

The parts of her job she loved the most were helping people to define their dreams and motivating them to achieve them, and working ethically and minimising ecological damage by the companies I worked for.

After returning from 21⁄2 years in the sun-drenched middle-east, she decided to focus on living her dream and is now a business / life coach specialising in working greener and sustainable living


“To the dull mind all nature is leaden, to the illumined mind the whole world burns and sparkles with light”


– Ralph Waldo Emerson

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