Almost half of U.S. households have access to carton recycling






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/9/2014 6:56:14 PM





 

Carton recyclingTwo thousand and thirteen marked a year of significant expansion of carton recycling. Thanks to collaborative industry efforts and support from communities nationwide, 48 percent of U.S. households now have access to carton recycling. Meeting the Carton Council of North America’s goals for 2013, access increased by 16.4 percent and expanded from 43 to 45 U.S. states. 

The Carton Council, a group of carton manufacturers united to deliver long-term collaborative solutions in order to divert valuable cartons from the landfill, credits this exceptional growth to voluntary private and public collaboration that includes industry companies and organizations, recycling facilities and local governments. Since 2009, the Carton Council has focused efforts on building infrastructure and improving access to carton recycling nationwide. At that time, just 18 percent of U.S. households had access to carton recycling. Currently, 56.1 million U.S. households have access to recycle cartons. 

“We are proud of the progress made in 2013,” says Jason Pelz, vp, environment, Tetra Pak North America, and vp of recycling projects for the Carton Council of North America. “Carton recycling access has increased 160 percent in just four years. School-aged children are learning about the importance of recycling their milk and juice cartons as part of their larger contribution to the environment, and are then taking these lessons home to their parents. Citizens, who are buying more food and drinks in cartons than ever before, now have more ways to recycle these containers. Communities are treating cartons as ‘must recycle’ items. All of these are examples of the huge strides made, working together in a collaborative way.” 

A number of large-sized communities added carton recycling in 2013, including Tampa, FL.; Memphis, TN; and Columbus, OH. In total, 7.9 million households gained access in 2013. As more communities have expanded their recycling programs to include cartons, the Carton Council has also launched a series of comprehensive public education campaigns to get the word out to local residents. The campaigns have included direct mail, television public service announcements, advertisements in local newspapers, and community event outreach, along with online digital ads and social media activities.

2013 Carton Campaign Communities where CCNA ran education campaigns. (The list of communities added is much longer.)
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ohio
Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas
Des Moines, Iowa
Lansing, Mich.
Memphis, Tenn.
Tampa, Fla.
Twin Cities, Minn.

“We expect access to continue to expand in 2014 as more recycling and waste management industry professionals, as well as local governments, recognize the value of cartons and the ease by which they can be added to their community’s recycling program.” Pelz says. “We also want to make more Americans aware that cartons are recyclable and will continue our efforts on broadening awareness in 2014.”

Additionally, the industry has been taking notice of the strides made to improve access to carton recycling:

• In August, the California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC) awarded the Carton Council with the 2013 Bow and Arrow Award for Coalition Building to recognize efforts in building strong, effective partnerships not only between competitors in carton manufacturing, but also across the entire recycling supply chain with recycling professionals, sorting facilities and paper mills. 

• The Carton Council was also recognized by the State of Texas Alliance for Recycling (STAR) in November with its 2013 Outstanding Recycling Partnership Award. 

Made mainly from paper, a renewable resource, lightweight and compact in design and with a low carbon footprint, cartons have proven to be a sustainable packaging solution that is growing in use for a variety of liquid and food products. Including cartons as an accepted material in every curbside recycling program offers a better, more cost-efficient option than other proposed recovery solutions.

The Carton Council currently has a campaign designed to help counties and municipalities, as well as recyclers, bring carton recycling to their residents. For more information, visit www.CartonOpportunities.org

Source: The Carton Council

 

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EPA and USDA join forces over food waste






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/5/2013 5:21:11 PM





 

 

EPA-USDAEnvironmental Protection Agency acting Administrator Bob Perciasepe joined U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack (shown) on June 4 to announce the launch of a challenge that asks farmers, processors, manufacturers, retailers, communities and government agencies to reduce wasted food. The U.S. Food Waste Challenge builds upon the success of EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge to help more Americans do their part to reduce food waste.

 

“Food waste is the single largest type of waste entering our landfills — Americans throw away up to 40 percent of their food. Addressing this issue helps to combat hunger and save money, while also combating climate change. Food waste in landfills decomposes to create potent greenhouse gases and by reducing this waste we can in turn reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” says Perciasepe. “I’m proud that EPA is joining with USDA today to announce the U.S. Food Waste Challenge. With the help of partners across the country, we can ensure that our nation’s food goes to our families and those in need – not the landfill.”

 

“The United States enjoys the most productive and abundant food supply on earth, but too much of this food goes to waste,” says Tom Vilsack. “Not only could this food be going to folks who need it – we also have an opportunity to reduce the amount of food that ends up in America’s landfills. By joining together with EPA and businesses from around the country, we have an opportunity to better educate folks about the problem of food waste and begin to address this problem across the nation.”

 

More food waste than paper and plastic

 

Americans send more food to landfills and incinerators than any other single municipal solid waste (MSW) – 35 million tons- even more than paper and plastic. When wasted food is sent to landfills, it decomposes and becomes a source of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. In addition, the production and transportation of food has a number of environmental impacts; by reducing wasted food our society helps conserve energy and reduces environmental impacts.

 

In 2010, EPA began challenging organizations along the food lifecycle to adopt more sustainable practices through its National Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) program’s Food Recovery Challenge (FRC). EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge provides direct technical assistance, a tracking system, and recognition to help support and motivate organizations to reduce their food waste. Through the simple act of measuring food that is wasted, organizations can immediately identify simple changes that lead to big reductions More than 200 organizations are now participating in the Food Recovery Challenge.

 

More on the U.S. Food Waste Challenge: www.usda.gov/oce/foodwaste/index.htm

 

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Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association challenges ‘natural’ plastic additives






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/18/2013 2:32:32 PM





Oxo Bio logoThe Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association is challenging the effectiveness of a recently-developed class of plastics containing additives described as “natural”, “enzymatic” or “microbiodegradable”.

 

These additives, which are not oxo-biodegradable, are being marketed as promoting biodegradation of a host of polymers within a few months to several years, even when buried deep in landfill.

 

An OPA statement (www.biodeg.org) reads: “It seems reasonable to believe that the additives themselves will biodegrade, but will they make the plastic biodegrade? It is difficult to believe on the published scientific evidence that incorporation of these additives into a polymeric matrix will render the resultant plastic article biodegradable at all, and on the basis of known scientific principle it is hard to see how it can. Biodegradation of the additive could give a false reading in a CO2-evolution test, suggesting that the plastic itself is biodegrading.”

 

The new additives appear to consist of a starch or polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix often extended with mineral filler, with no pro-degradant catalyst salts in the composition.

 

The idea seems to be to help plastic disintegrate but, unlike an oxo-biodegradable additive, it does not change the plastic into a biodegradable material.

 

Polyethylene and polypropylene do not present a metabolic pathway for enzymes and it is precisely because of these properties that they are useful for food-packaging.

 

In addition, degradation of PVC may produce toxic residues that are highly dangerous, and which may interfere with the survival of the biodegrading microorganisms.

 

A film made with the new additive was analyzed and found to contain inorganic filler derived from CaCO3 and some primary antioxidant, and approx. 400 parts per million of a secondary stabilizer. No other chemical compounds were found. Based on this analysis, these products cannot biodegrade.

 

There seems to be ambiguity in the testing by companies promoting these products. It is for example sometimes unclear whether the data refers to the additive or the final product.

 

Some of the testing seems to be on blends of material using much higher rates of additive than recommended. This will obviously alter its properties, processing-characteristics and recyclability, but the strength and fitness-for-purpose of products extended in such a manner must be doubted.

 

Further, if biodegradation is by an enzymatic process, the enzymes are unlikely to survive the processing conditions needed to create the plastic in the first place.

 

The OPA is not persuaded that these “enzymatic” additives will work as claimed.

For further information, visit www.biodeg.org.

 







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Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association challenges ‘natural’ plastic additives






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/18/2013 2:32:32 PM





Oxo Bio logoThe Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association is challenging the effectiveness of a recently-developed class of plastics containing additives described as “natural”, “enzymatic” or “microbiodegradable”.

 

These additives, which are not oxo-biodegradable, are being marketed as promoting biodegradation of a host of polymers within a few months to several years, even when buried deep in landfill.

 

An OPA statement (www.biodeg.org) reads: “It seems reasonable to believe that the additives themselves will biodegrade, but will they make the plastic biodegrade? It is difficult to believe on the published scientific evidence that incorporation of these additives into a polymeric matrix will render the resultant plastic article biodegradable at all, and on the basis of known scientific principle it is hard to see how it can. Biodegradation of the additive could give a false reading in a CO2-evolution test, suggesting that the plastic itself is biodegrading.”

 

The new additives appear to consist of a starch or polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix often extended with mineral filler, with no pro-degradant catalyst salts in the composition.

 

The idea seems to be to help plastic disintegrate but, unlike an oxo-biodegradable additive, it does not change the plastic into a biodegradable material.

 

Polyethylene and polypropylene do not present a metabolic pathway for enzymes and it is precisely because of these properties that they are useful for food-packaging.

 

In addition, degradation of PVC may produce toxic residues that are highly dangerous, and which may interfere with the survival of the biodegrading microorganisms.

 

A film made with the new additive was analyzed and found to contain inorganic filler derived from CaCO3 and some primary antioxidant, and approx. 400 parts per million of a secondary stabilizer. No other chemical compounds were found. Based on this analysis, these products cannot biodegrade.

 

There seems to be ambiguity in the testing by companies promoting these products. It is for example sometimes unclear whether the data refers to the additive or the final product.

 

Some of the testing seems to be on blends of material using much higher rates of additive than recommended. This will obviously alter its properties, processing-characteristics and recyclability, but the strength and fitness-for-purpose of products extended in such a manner must be doubted.

 

Further, if biodegradation is by an enzymatic process, the enzymes are unlikely to survive the processing conditions needed to create the plastic in the first place.

 

The OPA is not persuaded that these “enzymatic” additives will work as claimed.

For further information, visit www.biodeg.org.

 







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Unilever reduces waste by one million household bins






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/13/2013 3:47:52 PM





 

Unilever Knorr 322Unilever reported that more than 50 percent of all its factories have achieved the goal of sending no waste to landfill in 2012.

 

This goal was achieved while the company reported annual sales of €51 billion – up from €40 billion when Unilever set out its new vision of doubling the size of its business while reducing its environmental impact and increasing its positive social impact. Unilever has already reached the milestone of 100% of sites sending zero waste to landfill in 18 countries. This achievement is equivalent to removing more than one million household bins of waste every year.

 

Over 130 Unilever factories across the world, from Costa Rica to Japan, send no non-hazardous waste to landfill, up from 74 at start of the year. Key driver for this achievement is the elimination of waste in the factories. Additionally, waste is reduced, reused, recycled and recovered. Under its Sustainable Living Plan, Unilever announced that by 2020, total waste sent for disposal will be at or below 2008 levels – despite producing significantly higher volumes. Today, Unilever is stretching the original target even further by bringing the 2020 commitment 5 years forward. A total of 252 factories across the world will not send any non-hazardous waste to landfill by end of 2015.

 

“This is a significant achievement for Unilever as we make progress towards reaching our ambitious sustainability goals,” says Tony Dunnage, Unilever eco-efficiency manager. “It’s a great example of how we are putting our sustainability strategy into action – by decoupling the growth of our business from its environmental impact. Today’s landmark demonstrates how our factories are more environmentally responsible, which is helping us to save money to invest in our business. Having over 130 sites not sending waste to landfill equates to a cost saving of almost €70 million, all achieved without the need for capital expenditure.”

 

Unilever is implementing best practices from all over the world, actively using the global supply chain network, to create more environmentally responsible factories. By using the “design once and deploy everywhere” philosophy, the company is driving a sustainable model that is good for the environment and saves costs. Every new factory will produce 50% less waste than 5 years ago and will not send any non-hazardous waste to landfill by design.

 

Where reduction of waste is not sufficient it will reuse, recover or recycle waste to reach zero-waste to landfill. For example, in Russia Unilever collects a few tons of perforated outer-tea bags annually and this is sold in pet shops as animal bedding, used for wallpaper, etc. In Hefei (China) Unilever reduced plastics to wrap boxes on pallets by replacing it with reusable elastic fabrics.

 

Source: Unilever

 

 

 







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Will Tom Cruise Be Composting On The Set Of Top Gun 2?

Will Tom Cruise Be Composting On The Set Of Top Gun 2?

When the news broke that Tom Cruise would be working on a followup to the blockbuster classic Top Gun, everyone began talking about it. The buzz has grown, and the sequel has the potential to draw a gigantic crowd. One area that often goes unnoticed is the production behind the scenes.

Movie sets generate an enormous amount of waste, and surprisingly a hefty portion of this can be diverted from the landfill. Companies such as Reel Green Media located in California are showing production companies how to reduce their impacts on the environment while actually saving quite a fair bit of money.

Tyler Weaver, a waste reduction specialist and founder of Crazy About Compost, has been pushing to popularize sustainability in the film industry. He states that “the film industry could be doing so much more when it comes to recycling movie sets and composting banquet sized sets on a near daily basis. I feel that if just a few celebrities promoted these efforts, it could quickly become a standard that benefits everyone.”

Composting is an activity that anyone can participate in, not just for the hippies and farmers of the world. Essentially all of your food scraps and materials such as paper products (a good portion of food packaging) are all excellent candidates.

It would be great to see Tom Cruise putting his leftovers into a compost bin, wouldn’t it? In fact, more and more cities in California are hopping on board with a residential/commercial composting program. They always seem to be at the forefront of trying sustainable initiatives, don’t they? So how’s Hollywood doing?

Tyler Weaver offers free information about how to effectively and conveniently create excellent compost while reducing costs on waste disposal at http://www.crazyaboutcompost.com.

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Madden on Returnable Packaging and Reducing 30% Landfill Waste

Madden on Returnable Packaging and Reducing 30% Landfill Waste

David Madden is Founder and President of Container Exchanger (containerexchanger.com), an online marketplace for used returnable packaging systems, such as collapsible bulk containers, metal shipping containers, plastic pallets, and hand totes.  Founded in 2005, Madden led the company through the startup phase and into its current status as the definitive one-stop shop for used containers and crates.

 

 

 

Madden started Container Exchanger after five years of Engineering experience in the automotive industry, where Madden’s primary responsibilities revolved around waste reduction.  He soon realized that one exceptional source of waste in the automotive business lied in the returnable packaging systems.  After the packaging was used for a few years, the packaging was still good, but it was no longer needed.  The containers piled up and were often sold for scrap values or less.  Madden started Container Exchanger to fill this gap; find retail buyers for these used packaging systems, thereby increasing the money that the containers were sold for, and decreasing packaging acquisition costs for the purchaser.

 

 

Madden holds a Bachelors degree in Industrial Engineering from North Carolina State University, an MBA from Georgia Tech, and he received his Black Belt certificate from the DaimlerChrysler Quality Institute.

 

Returnable packaging reduces waste created by every business. The EarthWorks Group estimates that 30% of landfill waste is created by plastic and paper packaging. The use of cardboard products and other one-time-use packaging products contribute to this waste.

Folding bulk containers, industrial totes, and metal storage bins are used over and over again within a facility or between a supplier and a customer. They can be used literally thousands of times. These bulk boxes are much cheaper in the long term when compared to buying cardboard boxes and wood crates every time that product is shipped. Savings can be observed in the per piece packaging cost. While the upfront investment in returnable packaging may cost more, savings can be realized quickly through repeated use (the same bulk containers, metal bins, and totes are used over and over), labor (no more box assembly), material handling (fewer moves from stackable containers), quality (fewer rejects due to damaged packaging), and floor space (plastic and metal containers can stack very high). The per piece packaging costs for used bulk containers and totes can be as low as 5% of the costs for a comparable expendable solution, depending on shipping volumes.

Container Exchanger (www.containerexchanger.com) is dedicated to the sale and resale of reusable packaging and containers. The firm resells folding bulk containers, metal storage bins, plastic industrial totes, plastic pallets, and used gaylord boxes nationwide. When a company is finished using a returnable packaging fleet, Container Exchanger represents the seller and finds a buyer for the used bulk packaging. Sellers enjoy a high sales price for a better return on investment. Buyers save significantly in comparison to new packaging prices.

 

 

Container Exchanger

www.containerexchanger.com

David Madden, President

pr@containerexchanger.com

404-551-5599

Professional Marketing Firm for the Manufacturing Community and Manufacturing Journalist to most manufacturing magazines

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Reduce Your Company?s Carbon Footprint and Save Money

Reduce Your Company?s Carbon Footprint and Save Money

The environmental cost of commerce has become an important part of business in America and the world as we all become increasingly aware and concerned about the impact of our actions on climate change and our environment.  Many businesses are creating sustainability plans, training environmental impact officers and implementing company wide recycling and reduction programs.

For many small and medium sized businesses, the option of hiring a college degreed sustainability officer and staff is really not in the budget. There are however new online training programs which cater to small and medium sized businesses such as CarbonProfessionalSchool.com But short of taking a course and becoming an expert, what can your business do to be environmentally responsible and reduce your carbon footprint…all while saving money.

Here are 5 ways to reduce your carbon footprint and save some money.

(1) Recycle Toner and Ink Jet Cartridges. These things, which always run out at the most inopportune time, cost way too much and, contrary to what the big companies than manufacture them proclaim with their “send it in recycling programs” – end up in the landfill, usually in the poorest areas of the world.  The technology and quality of recycled toner and ink jet cartridges in many cases surpasses the original equipment manufacturers…and you get to support a local business like yours when you patronize them.   And don’t forget to set your printers to “draft” mode when you’re not printing for official communications…it’ll save you money and toner/ink.

(2) Use Less and Buy Recycled Paper. Back in the early 90’s when email was gaining popularity we all proclaimed that it was the beginning of the paperless office.  But the paper companies weren’t scared. Paper sales went through the roof because now we had more information to print out, copy and share with each other. Now there are a variety of document sharing services, including free ones like Google Docs, while allow immediate sharing of and collaboration of documents without having to print out 5 copies for the group to mark up.  It saves money, time and is much more efficient.

Furthermore, as the quality of recycled content paper has gone up to photo quality level and the cost has gone down to below the cost of “new” paper, it clearly makes no sense not to include the procurement of recycled printer and copier paper in your corporate sustainability plan.

(3) Go Paperless with your invoices. PayPal and Google Checkout both have electronic invoicing capabilities for those of you who process payments via credit card, and for many companies, their PayPal and Google Checkout accounts are tied directly to their corporate checking accounts for seemless, and transaction fee free payment processing.  They both offer a variety of export formats and integrate with popular accounting packages like QuickBooks and Microsoft Accounting.  

No more 3 copy carbon based invoices, no gas guzzling postmen delivering the mail and no more licking envelopes!

(4) Recycle Everything. Soda cans, newspapers, used equipment, furniture and materials (if you’re manufacturing things) all carry a price.  Aluminum cans trade for around $ .80 a pound (32 12 ounce cans = 1 pound) – so figure you can sell them to a local recycler for a bit better than half of that.  Doesn’t sound like a lot, but when you have an office full of Red Bull crazed employees or “Diet Coke Fiends” it can actually add up relatively quickly.   

List your used equipment on Craigslist or Google for a local company that will pick up and “recycle” your used equipment – or better yet, donate it to a local charity and take the tax deduction.  Goodwill and the Salvation Army will send out a truck to pick up larger items and most likely make weekly or monthly trips through your area.

(5) Offset Your Carbon Footprint with Carbon Credits

While Reducing, Reusing and Recycling is key in preventing climate change, offsetting your carbon emissions is the next great step in the preservation of our environment for generations to come. The Carbon Calculator Math is below, or you could use a Carbon Footprint Calculator at ecoaidnow.com/Calculators.aspx

To offset your carbon emissions simply means to neutralize your part in the polluting of our environment. In technical terms, a carbon offset is a certificate representing the reduction of one metric ton (2,205 lbs) of carbon dioxide emissions.

Certified Projects are developed such as a reforestation project that reduces carbon dioxide emissions, every ton of emissions reduced will result in the creation of one certified carbon offset (ecoaidnow.com)

Since carbon dioxide emissions are the principal cause of climate change, purchasing carbon offsets is key to promoting a greener environment.

When you offset your personal carbon emissions, you are doing your much-needed part in helping to put an end to global warming and climate change. In addition to making the world a better place, you just might also score a few popularity points with your friends and family.

Going Green at work doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to build a new building out of used tires, or procure all new energy saving computer and office equipment.  It is possible to work towards carbon neutrality without breaking the bank, and then supplement your efforts with cost-effective carbon credits.

Dr. Ken Pollock is EcoAid’s Chief Executive Officer, sets the strategy for the company. www.ecoaidnow.com. Read more of his articles at www.buycarboncreditsandoffsets.com. In addition, he will be launching http://carbonprofessionalschool.com in the near future to provide the training and tools for individuals, businesses and institutions. He has a PhD in Chemical Engineering.

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Go Green And Use High-Quality Plastic Containers

Go Green And Use High-Quality Plastic Containers

We have gotten far better at recycling and reusing products in an effort to save our planet. But, let’s face it, there are some things, such as plastic wrap, resealable bags and even aluminum foil, that are almost impossible to reuse. Most towns want clean aluminum foil, which means ninety percent of the foil used in most households cannot be recycled. All those bags and cling wrap go into the trash and clog our landfills.

More recently, companies have been developing so-called reusable, disposable plastic containers. They have that little “recyclable” symbol on them, but very few facilities are set up to recycle No. 5 plastics. So where do they end up? In landfills. That little number on the triangle included in most plastic products is a clear indication whether a product can be recycled or not. Yes, No. 5 plastics are considered recyclable, but most municipal recycling programs only accept No. 1 and No. 2 products.

Here’s another thing to consider: While we’re all being good samaritans by recycling everything under the sun, the market for recyclables is nearly saturated. Instead of being recycled, municipalities are stock-pilings tons of plastic and glass bottles and containers waiting for the day when someone will actually want them. In the end, the result is the same: a landfill stuffed with glass and plastic.

What’s the answer, then? Buy something you don’t have to throw away after just a few uses. The best way to go green with your food storage is to use high-quality food storage containers that will last for years. It’s the way we used to store food before convenience overtook common sense. Long-lasting plastic containers got their start back in the 1945 when Earl Tupper recognized that the invention of a new plastic, Polyethylene, could mean the start of something big. He started producing plastic bathroom cups in a variety of colors and then introduced the lidded bowl. Much innovation has happened over the years, with more and more variety and versatility now included in today’s container selection. You name it, you can find a container that can store it—and store it much longer than older containers. Many companies have come up with their own lines of plastic containers to compete with the famous Tupperware, which even after more than 60 years continues to be the industry standard.

Most recently came the advent of the disposable container. Thankfully, eco-friendly awareness is bringing back some common sense and more and more people are recognizing not only the economic benefits of buying good food containers, but also the environmental ones.

In fact, one major university is urging its students to use reusable food containers and ditch the disposable ones that have become quite popular among the dorm-living set. More glass containers are popping up, but many moms worry about breaking glass. You’re not going to send a five-year-old with a glass container filled with carrot sticks to class. The most environmentally friendly and safe alternative is plastic storage containers.

Jamison & Krista Alexander are the owners of http://www.keepmyfoodfresh.com and they promote great quality food storage containers.

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The Way to Discard the Plastic

The Way to Discard the Plastic

Plastic is the material from the synthetic or semi synthetic organic solid. The plastic material is used in many industrial products. Many companies form the plastic material to improve the performance but also reducing the cost.

You may see many things around you which are made from the plastic, for example the water bottle, bags, credit card, and etc. However, when you use the plastic product, you should be careful if you want to discard the waste. It is because the plastic product is not easily to decay to the landfill. It is better for you to reuse or recycling your plastic waste. By recycling, you can reduce the harm to your environment.

You can use your plastic to something useful for your life, for example pencil-case, ornament, or even bags. To do the recycling process, you will need to cut your plastic to many shapes. Here are some tools you can use to cut your plastic.

1. Special scissors. This scissors is able to cut many hard materials including the plastic material. The companies published this scissors even state that it can cut the penny.
2. The Nylon String. This string is usually used to cut the PVC pipe. Cutting the plastic using this tool will be fast and easy.
3. Hand Saw. If you use this hand saw to cut your plastic, you will experience the dull process. However, you will need to use the hacksaw blade to smooth the hard edges as the result of the hand-saw.
4. The Scribing Knife. You will be able to cut the plastic easily.
5. The hot Knife or the Soldering Iron. It can be said that cutting the plastic using the soldering iron is the best way. It works in any plastic types. You will face no difficulty to cut the plastic. However, when you cut the plastic using this soldering iron, you should be careful. Use the gloves to protect your hands from the heat. Never touch the tip of the soldering iron or you will burn your hand.

If you want to more about the soldering iron, you can try browsing soldering iron station. You may also want to browse Ungar soldering iron as your recommendation for your home soldering iron.

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A short film on my waterproof camera. Don’t waste a water bottle (recycle it) And use your tap water… It’s the same taste! Song: Proud by The Icarus Account
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