Snapsil portion pack






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Posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/24/2013 10:09:55 AM





 

Snapsil stick packs

 

 

Developed by Australian-based Snapsil Corp., the Snapsil semi-rigid container features a patented audible “snap-opening” function that allows consumers to open the package with one hand. Snapsil has developed a range of creative dispensing designs, enabling simple and controlled product release for a variety of unit-dose and single-serve consumer products.

Snapsil portion packs will be produced on the MULTIVAC thermoforming packaging machines. The snap-opening function is integrated in the lower web of the thermoformed pack. There is no requirement for any type of perforation of the film in the opening area of the portion pack; this provides unrestricted barrier properties for package contents. MUTIVAC has already performed extensive testing on the package at itsWolfertschwenden, Germany-based Test Application Center, identifying a number of tooling and package refinements and enhancements during the process.

 

With MULTIVAC as the machinery provider, interested marketers will benefit from the company’s established and extensive engineering, sales and service network. And, customers who already utilize MULTIVAC thermoforming packaging machines can introduce the Snapsil package with the addition of new tooling.

T.H.E.M. will support the Snapsil partnership with product evaluation, testing and contract packaging services. The first Snapsil production lines will be commercially operational at T.H.E.M.’s FDA-registered contract packaging and development facility in Marlton, NJ, later this year. Structured with multiple interchangeable packaging suites, T.H.E.M.’s facility has the flexibility to accommodate new package introductions like Snapsil with initial trial, test market, as well as higher volume commercial production runs.

The Snapsil pouch will make its commercial thermoformed debut in a single-serve offering of tomato sauce in August with three brands scheduled for launch during the second half of 2013. With a comprehensive array of configurations, the package is suitable for a number of branded food, personal care, healthcare and household products. Snapsil has also been tested by the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), and has been awarded the “Ease of Use” quality seal.

In recent focus group testing, consumer feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with participants expressing genuine appreciation for the audible “snap” sound that indicates the product is being opened for the first time, delivering a reassuring indicator of freshness. Focus group members also praised the ease-of-use and inherently fun, and interactive nature of the package.

 

www.them.net

 

www.multivac.com

 

 

 

 

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Who is willing to fork out more for fresh and sustainable packaging?






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/8/2013 10:57:55 AM





 

Fresh foods (Microsoft)When it comes to food and beverage packaging, consumers are most likely to pay more for value-added features that relate to freshness and sustainability. This is the latest finding from a global study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

Consumers from around the world were given a list of potential packaging features and asked which ones they would be willing to pay more for. On a global basis, consumers were most likely to say they would pay more for “Packaging that keeps food fresh longer” (55 percent) and “Packaging that is environmentally-friendly” (55 percent).

 

Following freshness and environmental benefits, consumers said they were likely to pay more for packaging that is re-usable (42 percent) and easier to use (39 percent). Interestingly, more sophisticated packaging features were less likely to motivate consumers to spend more: packaging that prevents mess or spills, keeps food and beverages at the right temperature, and makes it easier to eat and drink on-the-go ranked lowest (34 percent, 33 percent and 31 percent, respectively).

 

“Packaging plays a key role in consumer packaged goods innovation, whether marketers are introducing new products or trying to invigorate existing brands” ,” says Lauren Demar, global CEO, Ipsos InnoQuest. “As a key driver in the consumer’s decision to buy, packaging features can often be leveraged to charge a premium. Our latest findings indicate that consumers place the most value on packaging that preserves freshness and offers environmental benefits. For marketers, there may be an opportunity to win over consumers and increase revenues through innovative package designs that deliver sustainability of freshness as well as sustainability of the planet.”

 

The survey also revealed that certain countries were more likely to say they would pay more for fresh and sustainable packaging:

 

South Africa, Malaysia and India were most likely to say they would pay more for packaging that keeps food fresh longer.

Mexico, South Africa and Indonesia were most likely to say they would pay more for environmentally-friendly packing.

 

Complimentary access to the data in this report for each of the 26 countries is available upon request from Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

These are the findings from a study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest via Ipsos Global @dvisor, an online survey of citizens around the world. A total of 19,883 adults from 26 countries were polled between Aug. 7 and 21, 2012. The countries included Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.

 

Source: Ipsos InnoQuest

 

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Taking Out a Second Mortgage on Your Brand—a DIY Guide

Brands build equity with their consumers over time, just as homeowners build equity with their properties. When enough equity is built-up, both brands and homeowners can borrow against it – take out a second mortgage – and use the proceeds to improve their assets, including packaging. When is the right time to borrow against a brand’s equity? Which equity elements can provide the best return on a brand reinvestment? Here’s a DIY guide for marketers and designers who may be considering taking out a second mortgage to renovate or reinvest in their brands.

Know when to borrow
Timing is everything for homeowners seeking to take out a second mortgage and use the funds to update and improve their abode: They must build up enough equity in their property before they can borrow money against it. Similarly, timing is everything for brand owners seeking to take out a second mortgage and use the “proceeds” to update and improve their brand: They must build up enough equity – as evidenced by high levels of consumer confidence and overall brand strength – before they can borrow against it. So when is the right time to borrow? The following steps can help brand owners figure that out:

  1. Conduct a brand appraisal: Before borrowing against equity, owners must determine a brand’s market value, as expressed by the opinions and perceptions of loyal and non-loyal consumers. Loyals will inform the brand about its current strengths and non-loyals will supply critiques and  suggest additional attributes that could be tipping points to turn them, and others, into loyals. Combining the two points of view can help develop an accurate appraisal.
  2. Perform a brand inspection: Determining through research, sales analyses or other analytics what things are “wrong” with a brand and need fixing—where it does not fulfill its promise, meet performance expectations and/or fulfill consumer needs—can guide the brand renovation process and help brand owners determine how much equity to borrow.
  3. Focus on a high ROI: Homeowners know that renovating kitchens and bathrooms provides the greatest return on investment (ROI). Brand owners should view a brand renovation in the same light.  First, determine the renovation priority: Is it to make loyals happier or to attract new customers? Then, pick a renovation tactic: If the house (brand) is already in great shape, perhaps an addition (e.g., line extension) makes sense. Or maybe the brand’s curb appeal (on-shelf presence) needs to be enhanced. In the second scenario, evaluating and evolving the brand’s packaging could be a worthwhile investment.

Know your borrowing limit
Homeowners should carefully consider their borrowing limit when they take out a second mortgage or they risk defaulting on their loan. For example, a responsible owner is unlikely to borrow 80% of their home’s value (and a bank is unlikely to lend that much). Likewise, brand owners should carefully consider their borrowing limit when they mortgage (change) a percentage of their brand’s equity/assets or they risk defaulting on consumer loyalty. Consider Tropicana’s $35 million dollar package re-design disaster as an example of a brand renovation gone very wrong. When Tropicana abandoned its iconic straw in an effort to appear “premium” and attract more affluent consumers, the brand borrowed too much equity, compromised it strong visual strategy and alienated its most loyal consumers.

Evaluate your investment options
Like homeowners, brand owners have many options available in which to invest the proceeds from a second mortgage and should evaluate them thoroughly: Should the investment be fully allocated to a major renovation of the existing home/brand assets? Or should a portion of it be used to finance a new starter home (e.g., a new brand launch or brand extension) and the remaining funds/equity be banked to support its future growth?

The answers are likely to vary from brand to brand and category to category. Similar to some neighborhoods, where the high cost of upgrading from a two-bedroom to a three-bedroom house makes remodeling an existing home a more attractive investment option, some consumer goods categories have high costs of entry for a new product and the investment needs to be weighed carefully against the time and effort needed to achieve adequate ROI. While it can be expensive to build a new brand, sometimes it’s worth the cost. For instance, Proctor & Gamble created a whole new category, quick clean, when it launched the Swiffer brand. P&G smartly chose to invest in this “starter home” instead of attaching Swiffer to an existing brand. The investment paid off because granting Swiffer its own brand gave it the space to grow its own line extensions— like Wet Jet, Dusters and SweeperVac—into today’s successful product portfolio. However, this is not a one-size-fits-all solution. In other cases, it may be more expedient and cost-effective to use equity from an existing brand to develop a line extension. Among questions to consider:

  • What success have other brands had when investing in the category? Were their costs and efforts worth it?
  • What attributes and benefits do consumers value the most among brands within the category? How do investment/equity borrowing efforts complement those values?
  • What is the anticipated ROI and timeframe for success? Can the brand confidently deliver against that timeline before realizing the new venture profits will never surpass the initial fiscal (and brand equity) investments, essentially making the brand “upside down” on its mortgage

Follow your blueprints
Before embarking on a brand renovation, it’s important to draft precise “blueprints” that contain the foundational elements of the brand’s visual vernacular. These elements must be adhered to throughout the renovation process so that the brand’s structural integrity remains intact and the brand remains relevant to loyalists.

This rule can be difficult to follow; even the most successful brands take for granted the importance of their foundational elements from time to time. Let’s look at The Coca-Cola Company. In its recent “Arctic Home” campaign to help protect endangered species, Coke ignored its brand blueprint and mortgaged too many of its visual architecture elements when it changed its entire line of can colors (e.g., red for Coke and silver for Diet Coke, etc.) to white. The campaign failed, in part, because Coke borrowed too much against its brand equity – removing its familiar brand architecture cues caused confusion at shelf because consumers could no longer quickly self-select their favorite products.

Establish a realistic timeline
Brand renovation doesn’t happen as quickly as an episode of “Extreme Home Makeover.”  Brand owners should recognize that substantive change may take months or years and plan their timeline accordingly instead of banking on a quick “Move that bus!” moment. The path to success starts by developing a plan for the visual changes (how to do the renovation), then selecting the branding and communication devices (building materials) to take the consumer on the journey in a manner that surprises and delights – rather than shocks – them. In doing so, the brand creates desire and anticipation for its next renovation, as Apple has successfully done with its evolution of iPods to iPhones to iPads and more.

Watch your brand’s “property” value grow
Renovating a home can produce a great sense of accomplishment. Updating or extending a brand can be equally rewarding. Homeowners and brand owners who carefully consider when and how much to borrow against their equity, evaluate their investment options, follow a renovation blueprint, and establish a realistic timeline will find that taking out a second mortgage can turn a second mortgage into first-rate ROI.

Allison Bradley is brand strategy director at Hyperquake.  Sherwood MacVeigh, also a brand strategy director at Hyperquake, contributed to this article. Allison can be reached at allison.bradley@hyperquake.com. Sherwood can be reached at sherwood.macveigh@hyperquake.com.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Desire for details

In a consumer insights study, Anthem Worldwide, the branding agency aim of Schawk, predicted Consumer Engaged, Shopper Informedto be a ruling trend in 2013. (For more in-depth data, click to read more and access “Anthem Sightings, Vol.4, 2012: The Forecast Issue.” )

“The results of the study support the conclusion that despite the pervading belief of marketers that consumers and shoppers want to simplify as much as possible, 58 percent of total respondents believe “Getting into the details” will be a more prominent trend in 2013 compared to the counter trend “Skimming the highlights,” says Kathy Oneto, vice president, brand strategy, of Anthem’s San Francisco office. (See more of Oneto’s insights in the video “Inflection Point: Where Will 2013 Take Us?”)

She adds, “One could argue that today’s consumers are more engaged with brands than ever before. Some even create ads for brands, while others create movements that change company actions. At the same time, shoppers are now armed with and connected to more information, reviews, and recommendations than in the past, making them savvy, engaged purchasers.”

The study found that while U.S. consumers were balanced in their responses, 61% of U.K. consumers and 59% of Chinese consumers were more strongly aligned with the sentiment that “Getting into the details” would be more prominent compared to “Skimming the highlights.” Despite people being busy, it appears they are willing to dig in and take advantage of the data now available to them.

Oneto warns that designers should move forward in moderation, though. “And yet, there’s merit to the Art of Skimming counter trend,” she notes. “While some people engage deeply with brands and have more informed purchasing habits, Twitter has fueled brevity of communication. Our full, on-demand, connected lives amplify Twitter’s impact, making us consume information in bite-sized pieces, catching only the headlines and wanting to know more with less.”

Oneto remarked: “When consumers are given too much information, they are more likely to over think their decisions and feel less confident about the choices they make. The most important question marketers need to ask themselves is this: How can you tell your story in as simple and consumable a way possible, leveraging visual design cues and copy to drive purchases and build affinity?”

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Want Results? Avoid Beauty Contests When It Comes To Package Design

Want Results? Avoid Beauty Contests When It Comes To Package Design

Marketers will often turn to focus groups for feedback on current or proposed packaging design. Unfortunately, traditional focus groups tend to mimic beauty contests. They turn into opinion gathering sessions that support a participant’s point of view, rather than providing feedback on consumers’ actual buying behavior within the store environment where products are purchased.

Participants play art director over design issues, confuse the brand with the package design, react emotionally to price increase questions, and talk about what they “like” and “don’t like”. As a result, the output quality of this type of research is minimal at best.

On the other hand, effective behavior-based focus group research measures the effect of brand influence, analyzes the buying behavior of participants in a comparative retail environment, and uses eye-tracking technology to find out what consumers pay attention to – and what they ignore.

The significance of brand influence

Effective brand value testing involves separating the brand name from the actual proposed or current package design. This measurement gives an indication of how the brand is perceived prior to seeing a packaged product. Participants are then introduced to the packaging and asked if the new or proposed package design adds, or detracts from, perceived brand value. Marketers may be making a costly mistake if the perceived value of a brand is negatively affected by a new design architecture.

Buying behavior of participants in a retail environment

Packaging design is measured and tested in the comparative marketplace for which it is intended. A comparative marketplace is one in which the competition sits side by side for comparison and consideration. This is a circumstance that does not usually occur in print and broadcast media; as competitors usually do not jockey to be side-by-side.

According to Wharton School research, over one third of the brands displayed on the shelf are never seen. A colorful and exciting new design that is approved in the boardroom or chosen in a focus group may fail if all the other packages on the shelf in the same category are equally as colorful and exciting. Contrast is what makes a package design stand out on the shelf, and this can be achieved through the effective means of both design and structural innovation.

Eye-tracking technology

Consumers spend 2-3 seconds scanning a package for relevant information. If they do not immediately comprehend the benefit they will move on to a competitor’s brand. It is imperative to know what consumers are seeing and what they are not, and this can be done effectively with eye-tracking technology. This type of research gives marketers an idea of which messaging to prioritize, and which information to minimize.

Not surprisingly, the more text there is on a package, the less it will be read. Unfortunately, many well-meaning marketers think the opposite, and act accordingly. Some of the product designers at Microsoft have put together a great parody of this practice by showing how the Microsoft marketing department would redesign Apple’s iPod package. Instead of the simple and elegant messaging Apple created, it becomes a hodgepodge of system requirements, badges, call-outs, sub-branding logos, benefit statements, feature lists, and more!

Effective behavior-based focus group research goes beyond “opinion gathering”, giving researchers the feedback necessary to understand the impact and value of both present, and proposed packaging design in real-world terms.

Tim Robertson is Creative Director of BigCity, a packaging design agency. Visit http://www.bigcitygraphics.ca for more ways to avoid old-paradigm thinking around package design and research.

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Conceptual Idea Of Product Package Design

Conceptual Idea Of Product Package Design

If you are a marketer who gain some experience of marketing field, you should realise that one of the most powerful marketing tool is packaging. Especially for the consumer products in the same type of product but the different is only packaging. For example, drinking water, as you can see that drinking water product are same over the world, we just can not really identify the different of the product different but what we can se the different is only the package that contain the water.

So this is what we are talking about. Packaging can influence the consumer to buy the product, which sometimes it is much more important than the quality of the product itself. And this is what many of marketer trying to archive in order to be competitive in the market. However, there are still many young marketers who still misconcept of designing good product package.

It is likely that to day many marketer just trying to design the product package that has good appearance and attractive to the customers. Sometimes there is also a strong argument from consumers that the manufacturers just to design beautiful package only to increase the price without increasing the quality of the product. Therefore, it is clearly that quite unfair for consumer to buy more expensive products but still get the same quality and the price just increase because of the cost of product packaging.

According to the fact described above that the main purpose of product packaging design is to create “difference” to another product in the same market. But this does not mean that it is all about the appearance of the design that has to be attractive to customer. There are still more to consider in order achieving sales targets. This is because the consumers now are very well educated and they just do not look at the appearance of the package to make final decision.

However, some factor may be still play major role in customer’ decision making process, such as branding. We have to admit that branding is one of the most important marketing tool that costly, time and resource consuming but the result is magnificent. Success of product branding can indicate the success of the organisation. In case that the product has very strong branding, the importance of product packaging seem to be less significant. This is because consumers seem to stick with the brand rather than the appearance of the product package. Therefore, the characteristics of the package of product tend to be focus or other aspect such as environmental preservation, re-cycleable, flexible and movable etc.

In contrast with the product that in the stage of building its brand, the characteristics of packaging design is so important. Product designer tend to focus more on appearance of the package. However, this could be very costly and sometimes not worth the investment because it may not increase the sales volume as expect. However, for this type of product, packaging may be only one of the important marketing factor that have to be focus on, choosing other marketing tool is always the better option.

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Coffee and Ready-to-Drink Coffee in the U.S.: The Market and Opportunities in Retail and Foodservice, 6th Edition

Coffee and Ready-to-Drink Coffee in the U.S.: The Market and Opportunities in Retail and Foodservice, 6th Edition

As the U.S. economy slid deeper into recession during 2009, coffee marketers and foodservice operators moved in the opposite direction, digging out of the trench of 2008 with a variety of strategies designed to capitalize on the fact that even upscale coffee is a relatively thrifty luxury that offers comfort during stressful times. Two success stories were the rebound of Starbucks on the foodservice side and the revitalization of the former P&G retail coffee portfolio by J M. Smucker. Although the era when the coffee market grew effortlessly through premiumization may have ended, such upscale trends as the shifts towards specialty coffee beverages, gourmet beans and ethical consumerism are still clearly in force. What’s more, there’s ample opportunity for companies to capitalize on such trends as the economy recovers—not by ignoring the tougher times or reversing strategy, but by crafting an image that’s both upscale and responsive to consumers’ stronger-than-ever demand for value.

Packaged Facts’ Coffee and Ready-to-Drink Coffee in the U.S.: The Market and Opportunities in Retail and Foodservice, 6th Edition offers a comprehensive look at this .5 billion market, examining both the retail and foodservice sides of the business as well as the growing overlap of the two. On the retail side, the report analyzes coffee sold for future brewing—beans and ground, and instant—as well as RTD coffee drinks (à la Frappuccinos), as well as coffee enthusiast’s new brewing method of choice: single-serve (pod) coffee. Positive upscaling trends that slowed during the weak economy will gradually regain the upper hand, the report predicts, resulting in increasing annual percentage sales gains lifting sales by 23% by 2014 to reach .3 billion. The report examines sales across the entire retail universe, using Information Resources, Inc. InfoScan Review data and SPINSscan data to extensively chart performance, market composition and marketer/brand performance for the mass-market and natural supermarket channels.

Comprehensive coverage is also devoted to the vast foodservice market for coffee, including the expansion of specialty drinks at such mass-market venues as McDonalds, Dunkin’ Donuts and, most recently, Burger King with its planned 2010 roll-out of Starbucks’ Seattle’s Best. Supplementing the market tracking and forecasting of previous editions, Coffee and Ready-to-Drink Coffee in the U.S.: The Market and Opportunities in Retail and Foodservice, 6th Edition pays special attention to trends in new product development, inclusive of valuable global perspective; details competitive opportunities, including via in-depth company profiles; explores winning marketing methods including Web-based activity; and provides detailed consumer profiling using Experian Simmons data for 2009.

Table Of Contents
Chapter 1: Executive Summary
Introduction
Scope of Report: Foodservice and Retail
Report Methodology
The Market
Economic Downturn Takes a Toll
Figure 1-1: Share of Total U.S. Dollar Sales of Coffee: Foodservice vs. Retail, 2003, 2007 and 2009 (percent)
Dry Coffee Category Leads in Market Share
Foodservice Sales Gain in Restaurants
Supermarkets Lose Share to Cheaper Alternatives
The Economy and Its Impact
Coffee Sales Fortunes to Improve Through 2014
The Marketers
Thousands of Marketers
Marketers Employ Multiple Sales Channels
Smucker Is No. 1 Coffee Marketer
Top 10 Brands in Natural Supermarket Channel
Marketing & New Product Trends
Upscale Coffee Trends Collide with Downscale Economy
Thrifty Upscale Coffee: Can It Work Outside Foodservice?
Ideological Coffee: Organic, Natural and Fair Trade
Shade Grown Coffee
Foodservice and Retail Trend Overview
Increasing Overlap and Cross-Competition Between Foodservice and Retail
Despite Chain Restaurant Proliferation, Mom and Pops Remain Industry Paradigm
Specialty Coffee Competition Intensifies and Diversifies
Burger King to Roll Out Seattle’s Best in 2010 as Part of Revamped Breakfast Program
Coffee Is Best-Selling Hot Beverage at Convenience Stores
Supermarkets Lead Retail Market for Packaged Coffee
Fair Trade Coffee Boosts Walmart’s Image, Sales
Consumer Trends
More than 50% of Americans Drink Coffee Daily
Consumer Love Affair with Gourmet Coffee Wanes a Bit
Starbucks Restaurants Feel Recession Squeeze
Usage of Coffee by Type
Figure 1-2: Household Usage Rates of Coffee: By Product Type, 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Brands Usage Rates

Chapter 2: The Products
Introduction
Scope of Report: Foodservice and Retail
Dollar Sales Based on Retail Value
Excluded Products
Product Breakouts
Product Types
Coffee Brewed and Served by the Cup
Ground Coffee
Whole Bean Coffee
Single-Serve Pods and Capsules
Instant/Freeze-Dried Coffee
Instant Cappuccino and Specialty Coffee Mixes
Liquid Coffee Concentrates
Packaged Ready-to-Drink (RTD) Coffee Beverages
IRI Categories
Additional Descriptors
Arabica vs. Robusta
Decaffeinated Coffee
Types of Roasts
Espresso: A Brewing Process as Well as a Roast
Blends vs. Varietals
Estate Coffee
Flavors
Organic Coffee and Sustainably Grown Coffee
Fair Trade Coffee
Shade Grown Coffee
Figure 2-1: Tree Canopies In Coffee Growing (levels of shade)
Global Market Overview
A Primary Commodity
South America and Central America Account for Two-Thirds of World Coffee Production
Figure 2-2: World Coffee Production: Marketing Years, 2003/2004-2009/2010 (number of bags in millions)
Europe and Asia Pacific Lead in New Coffee Product Introductions
Table 2-1: Share of Global Coffee Product Launches: By Region and Annual Total, 2005-2009 (number)
Nestlé Leads by Number of Coffee Product Introductions
Table 2-2: Top 10 International Marketers: By Number of Coffee Product Launches, 2005-2009 (number)
Instant Gratification Conquers the World
Table 2-3: Top 20 Package Tags/Marketing Claims: By Number of Global Coffee Product Launches, 2005-2008

Chapter 3: The Market
Market Size and Growth
Economic Downturn Takes a Toll
Table 3-1: Total U.S. Sales of Coffee, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Foodservice Sales Top Billion
Table 3-2: U.S. Sales of Coffee Through Foodservice Channels, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Retail Sales of Coffee Hit Billion
Table 3-3: U.S. Sales of Coffee Through Retail Channels, 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Foodservice and Retail Shares Remain Stable
Figure 3-1: Share of Total U.S. Dollar Sales of Coffee: Foodservice vs. Retail, 2003, 2007 and 2009 (percent)
Retail Market Composition
Dry Coffee Category Leads in Market Share
Table 3-4: IRI-Tracked Sales and Share of Coffee by Category, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Ground Coffee Segment Dominates Dry Coffee Category
Table 3-5a: IRI-Tracked Sales of Dry Coffee Category: Dollar Sales, Change and Category Share by Segment, 2009 (in million of dollars)
Table 3-5b: IRI-Tracked Unit and Volume Sales of Dry Coffee: By Segment, 2009 vs. Year Ago (in millions)
Relative Fortunes of Coffee Segments Remain Constant Despite Recession
Overarching Dry Coffee Trend Is—Back to the Future
Table 3-6: IRI-Tracked Sales of Dry Coffee by Segment: Basic vs. Processed, 2008-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Decaf Coffee Continues to Slide
Table 3-7: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Decaffeinated Coffee: By Segment, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Instant Coffee Sales Go Slowly
Table 3-8: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Instant Coffee: By Segment, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
RTD Coffee Dominates Liquid Coffee Category
Table 3-9a: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Liquid Coffee: By Segment, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 3-9b: IRI-Tracked Unit and Volume Sales of Liquid Coffee Category: By Segment, 2009 vs. Year Ago (in millions)
Bolthouse Farms Reigns in RFG RTD Coffee Drink Segment
Table 3-10: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of Refrigerated RTD Coffee, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Cool Brew Lifts Refrigerated Coffee Concentrate Segment
Sales by Channel
Foodservice Sales Gain in Restaurants
Table 3-11: Share of U.S. Foodservice Dollar Sales of Coffee: By Venue, 2008-2009 (percent)
Supermarkets Lose Share to Cheaper Alternatives
Table 3-12: Share of U.S. Retail Dollar Sales of Coffee: By Channel, 2008-2009 (percent)
Seasonality and Regionality
Retail Sales Highly Seasonal
HealthSaver Caffeinated Cities Survey Details Trends by Region
Table 3-13a: U.S. Cities with Highest Levels of Coffee Consumption: Regular Coffee & Specialty Coffee Drinks, 2007 vs. 2008
Table 3-13b: U.S. Cities with Lowest Levels of Coffee Consumption: Regular Coffee & Specialty Coffee Drinks, 2007 vs. 2008
Table 3-13c: “Most Caffeinated U.S. Cities”: 2007 vs. 2008
Table 3-13d: “Least Caffeinated U.S. Cities”: 2007 vs. 2008
Table 3-13e: U.S. Cities Most Likely to Say Caffeine Is Good for You: 2007 vs. 2008
Table 3-13f: U.S. Cities Most Likely to Say Caffeine Is Bad for You: 2007 vs. 2008
Northwest Coffee Culture Hides Specialty Coffee’s East Coast Roots
Market Outlook
The Economy and Its Impact
A Shift to Gourmet/Specialty Coffee
More Than Half of Americans Drink Coffee Daily
Competition from a Broad Spectrum of Beverages
Table 3-14: IRI-Tracked Sales and Share of Major Beverage Categories, 2009 vs. Year Ago (in millions of dollars)
RTD Tea Beats Out RTD Coffee on Price
Table 3-15: IRI-Tracked Dollar Sales of RTD Coffee vs. RTD Tea, 2009 vs. Year Ago (in millions of dollars)
New Spins on Caffeine
New Research Supports Coffee’s Health Halo
Single-Serve Systems Are Here to Stay
Coffee Pricing Is Volatile
Raw Coffee Prices Shrink in 2009
Table 3-16: Composite Green Coffee Prices, 2005-2008 (in cents per pound)
Looking Ahead: Projected Market Growth
Economy Slowly Improving
Focus on Environmental and Social Responsibility Will Endure
Coffee as the New Health Food
Hispanic Coffee Sales to Grow
Table 3-17: Projected Hispanic Population as Percent of Total U.S. Population: 2000, 2007, 2010 and 2015
Coffee Sales Fortunes to Improve Through 2014
Table 3-18: Projected Total U.S. Sales of Coffee, 2009-2014 (in millions of dollars)
Foodservice Sales to Near Billion
Table 3-19: Projected U.S. Sales of Coffee Through Foodservice Channels, 2009-2014 (in millions of dollars)
Steady Growth in Retail Sales
Table 3-20: Projected U.S. Sales of Coffee Through Retail Channels, 2009-2014 (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 4: The Marketers
Competitive Overview
A Complex Marketing Structure
Thousands of Marketers
Marketers Employ Multiple Sales Channels
Major Coffee Marketers
Foodservice Cross-Over
Specialty Coffee Marketers
Hispanic-Style Coffee Marketers
Joint Ventures Provide Synergies
The North American Coffee Partnership
Coca-Cola, Godiva, Caribou and More
Competitive Positioning
Marketer and Brand Shares
Methodology
Smucker Is No. 1 Coffee Marketer
Table 4-1: Top 10 Coffee Marketers by IRI-Tracked Sales and Market Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Smucker and Kraft Dominate Mammoth Ground Coffee Segment
No Other Marketers Claim Double-Digit Share
Smaller Marketers Make Impressive Gains
Smucker Leads Ground Decaf Segment
Nestlé Tops 0 Million Instant Coffee Segment
Kraft and Smucker Lead Instant Decaf Segment
Eight O’Clock Moves Up in Whole Beans Segment
North American Coffee Partnership Owns RTD Coffee Segment
Wm. Bolthouse Reigns in Refrigerated RTD Segment
Cool Brew Dominates Tiny Refrigerated Coffee Concentrate Segment
Top 10 Brands in Natural Supermarket Channel
Table 4-2: Leading Ground Coffee Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 4-3: Leading Ground Decaffeinated Coffee Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 4-4: Leading Instant Coffee Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 4-5: Leading Instant Decaf Coffee Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 4-6: Leading Whole Beans Coffee Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 4-7: Leading Shelf-Stable RTD Coffee Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 4-8: Leading Refrigerated RTD Coffee Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in millions of dollars)
Table 4-9: Leading Refrigerated Coffee Concentrate Marketers and Brands: By IRI-Tracked Sales and Share, 2009 (in dollars)
Table 4-10: Top 10 Brands of Ground Coffee in Natural Supermarket Channel: Market Share and Dollar Sales, 52 Weeks Ending January 23, 2010 vs. Year Ago (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 5: Marketing & New Product Trends
Upscale Coffee Trends Collide with Downscale Economy
Figure 5-1: Number of Coffee Beverage Introductions, 2005-2009
Figure 5-2: U.S. Gross Domestic Product, 2005-2009 (in dollars)
Table 5-1: Number of Coffee Beverage Introductions by Package Tags/Claims, 2005-2009
Will Economic Turnaround Trigger New Product Turnaround?
Table 5-2: Number of Coffee Beverage Introductions, 2008 vs. 2009
Thrifty Upscale Coffee: Can It Work Outside Foodservice?
Ideological Coffee: Organic, Natural and Fair Trade
Whole Foods vs. Its Customers: Nobody Wins
Certification Labeling: Baffling for Consumers and Marketers Alike
Starbucks C.A.F.E.: Not Where You Go for a Cup of Joe
Figure 5-3: C.A.F.E Scorecard Excerpt
Ethical Direct Trade
UTZ Certified Good Inside: Is It Good Enough for True Believers?
Shade Grown Coffee
Three Strikes and You’re In—Triple Certification
Table 5-3: Caffe Ibis Coffee—Triple Certification Labels
“Green” Labels, Labels, Everywhere
Table 5-4: Organic, Shade Grown (aka Bird Friendly), and Fair Trade Labels
Products Launches May Include Myriad Products
Green Mountain Coffee Entries Includes Donut House Collection
The Four Runners Up
2009 Whole Bean and Ground Coffee Intros Exhibit Variety and Growing Sophistication
Single-Origin Coffees
Limited Editions
New Bottled Drinks Pose Question: Is Coffee the New Chocolate?
Coffee-Energy Drink Connection Continues in 2009
Java Has Been a Monster
Coca-Cola Goes Full Throttle into Hybrid Coffee/Energy Drinks
7-Eleven’s Fusion Energy Coffee Launches Foodservice Trend
Table 5-5: Coffee Beverages Introduced in 2009

Chapter 6: Foodservice and Retail Trend Overview
Introduction
Increasing Overlap and Cross-Competition Between Foodservice and Retail
Foodservice Overview
Foodservice Venues
Foodservice Distribution Methods
Away from Home Food Spending Remains Static
Full-Service Restaurant Share of Sales Surges
Table 6-1: Average U.S. Household Expenditures on Food, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)
Table 6-2a: Dollar Sales of Meals and Snacks Away from Home: By Type of Outlet, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)
Table 6-2b: Dollar Sales of Meals and Snacks Away from Home: By Type of Outlet, 2004-2008 (in millions of dollars)
Table 6-3a: Share of Dollar Sales of Meals and Snacks Away from Home: By Type of Outlet, 2004-2008 (percent)
Table 6-3b: Share of Dollar Sales of Meals and Snacks Away from Home: By Type of Outlet, 2004-2008 (percent)
Restaurant Industry Trade Group Projects Growth in 2010
Table 6-4: Restaurant Industry Sales: 2008-2010 (in billions of dollars)
Despite Chain Restaurant Proliferation, Mom and Pops Remain Industry Paradigm
Organic Coffee “Hot” in 2010 Restaurant Survey
Specialty Coffee Competition Intensifies and Diversifies
Burger King to Roll Out Seattle’s Best in 2010 as Part of Revamped Breakfast Program
Different Demographics?
Coffeehouses, Kiosks and Coffee Carts
Company Snapshot: Tim Hortons
Drive-Thrus: Competitive Advantage or Retrograde Concept?
The Gasoline Factor
Coffee Is Best-Selling Hot Beverage at Convenience Stores
Coffee Tops C-Store Shopper Lists
7-Eleven Achieves Franchise-Only Status in U.S. While Playing Up Coffee
“Looking Good In Any Cup Size” Ad Campaign Introduces New Iced Coffee Line
New Coffee Is Old News at 7-Eleven
7-Eleven Announces NYC Expansion Plans
Sheetz Specialty Coffee Drinks Include Lattes, Cappuccinos and Mochas
ExxonMobil Combines Upscale Coffee Image with Relaxed Approach
Hess/Dunkin’ Donuts Rollout Continues
Walgreen Tests Café W
Licensed Cafés and Kiosks
Books Go Better with Cafés
Mountain Mudd Franchises Spread from Billings to Lebanon
Less Workers = Less Office Coffee Service
Vending Machines Lagging in U.S., Picking Up in Britain
The Starbucks Vending Machine Experience
For Hotels, It’s “Goodbye Freeze-Dried, Hello Espresso”
Airlines Flying High with Coffee Grounds
Retail Trend Overview
Retail Distribution Methods
Types of Retail Outlets
Supermarkets Lead Retail Market for Packaged Coffee
Mass Merchandisers, Supercenters & Warehouse Clubs
Walmart a Top Coffee Seller
Fair Trade Coffee Boosts Walmart’s Image, Sales
Contest for National Warehouse Club Supremacy
Gourmet/Specialty Food Stores
Light Roast Coffee
Medium Roast Coffee
Dark Roast Coffee
Specialty Coffee Stores
Company Snapshot: The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf
Health and Natural Food Stores
Top Coffee Brands in Natural/Specialty Arena
Table 6-5: Top UNFI Brands in Natural/Specialty Channels: by Share and Number of SKUs, 2008 vs.2009 (percent and number)
Internet, Mail Order, and Subscriptions

Chapter 7: Competitor Profiles
Competitor Profile: Caribou Coffee Co., Inc.
Company Overview
Rebuilding and Rebranding Post Recession
Commercial Expansion Shows Results
Caribou Coffeehouses’ Rustic Design Reinforces Brand Identity
We’re #2, We Try Harder
Reinventing the Hot Chocolate Wheel
Reaching Out to Consumers on a Number of Fronts
Competitor Profile: Dunkin’ Brands, Inc
Company Overview
“We Are Mainstream America”
“You Kin’ Do It” Campaign Cheers on “Everyday People”
Dunkin’ Pushes Forward with Expansion Plans
Various Types of New Outlets Targeted
Franchisees Unhappy with Increased Retail Competition
Competitor Profile: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc
Company Overview
Specialty Coffee Unit Growing Rapidly
Keurig Unit Growing Even More Rapidly
Green Mountain’s CAGR Has Risen to 53% Since Keurig Acquisition
Green Mountain Acquires Tulley’s for .3 Million
Green Mountain Acquires Timothy and Revises Projections Up Once More
Balanced, Multichannel Distribution
How Keurig Grows Sales
Social Responsibility: Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is
Company Continues Ethical/Fair Trade Marketing
Competitor Profile: Kraft Foods, Inc
Company Overview
Table 7-1: Kraft, Inc. Net Revenues: By Region and Category, 2008 (in billions of dollars)
Kraft Acquires Cadbury
The Maxwell House Roller Coaster
Lawsuit with P&G Settled
Brewing Some Good Marketing
Yuban Is Revitalized
Sanka Suffers from Image Problem
General Foods International Coffee Mixes Losing Their Luster
Starbucks Agreement Has Had Long-Term Benefits
Gevalia Kaffe Gets New U.S. Push
Kraft’s Tassimo Home Brewing System Succeeds in Europe But Stumbles in the U.S.
Kraft Switches to Bosch
Kraft Settles Lawsuit with Keurig
Tassimo Looking to Bring Its European Mojo to the U.S
Advertising “Webisodes” Fall Flat
Tassimo Has Potential
Competitor Profile: McDonald’s Corp.
Company Overview
McCafé: An Idea Whose Time Has Come
Concept Traces Back to Premium Roast Coffee Upgrade
Adding Coffee Bars
Advertising Approaches: Special, But Unsnobby
McCafés a Global Success Story
McDonald’s Japan Shoots for No. 1 in Espresso Drinks
Competitor Profile: Massimo Zanetti Beverage USA, Inc.
Company Overview
The Third Largest Roaster in the U.S
Chock Full O’Nuts: “A Heavenly Coffee”—Literally
Hills Bros. Popular with Heavy Coffee Drinkers
MJB Premium Coffee in the Pacific Northwest
Chase & Sanborn Offers Affordable Price
Cafés and Foodservice
Competitor Profile: Nestlé USA, Inc.
Company Overview
Nestlé’s U.S. Operations: Vast and Varied
Joint Ventures with Jamba Juice & Coke
Nestlé Leads Instant Coffee Market
Nespresso’s Speedy Nespresso Brings Delayed Financial Gratification
Worldwide Nespresso Gains 28% in Third Quarter of 2009
Nescafé Rolls Out Dolce Gusto
Competitor Profile: Peet’s Coffee & Tea, Inc.
Company Overview
Sales Grow Despite Recession
Two Business Segments: Retail Stores and Specialty Sales
Peet’s Pulls in Sails Against Headwind of Economy
Peet’s Mantra: “It’s All About the Coffee”
Peet’s Retail Stores Are Marching Eastward
Peet’s 10 Commandments
Now a National Brand in Grocery Channels
Partnership with Vistar Should Increase Office Sales
Two Types of Foodservice Accounts
Bidding War for Diedrich
Competitor Profile: Sara Lee Corp.
Company Overview
Sales Results
Sara Lee Sheds U.S. Retail Coffee and DSD Foodservice Coffee Businesses
DSD Sale Does Not Mean Capitulation in Foodservice Competition
Despite Divestitures, Sara Lee Still Brewing Up a Storm
Senseo a Global Single-Serve Brand
U.S. Customers Wait for Senseo to Return
Competitor Profile: The J.M. Smucker Co.
Company Overview
Smucker Acquires Coffee Brands from P&G
A Focus on Breakfast and Tradition
A Family Business with a Thirst for No. 1 Brands
Folgers Coffee Sales Perk Up Under Smucker
Pricing Key to Success
Competitor Profile: Starbucks Corp
Starbucks to World: “Accounts of My Demise Are Somewhat Exaggerated”
Table 7-2: Starbucks Results of Operations for Fiscal Years 2005-2009 (in millions of dollars)
Return of Prodigal CEO Reignites Company
Past Is Prologue as Starbucks Reevaluates and Regroups
Schultz Shutters Hundreds of Stores
Starbucks Takes Time Out to Retrain Baristas
The Vast Worldwide Starbucks Coffeehouse Phenomenon
Starbucks “Individualizes” New Outlets
Starbucks Testing 31-Oz. Trenta Iced Drinks
Other Strategic Initiatives
Fresh Appeal
New Machines
Pike Place Roast
Clover Upscale Brewed
Customer Loyalty Program
My Starbucks Idea Webpage
Table 7-3: “My Starbucks Ideas” by Type and Number as of December 8, 2009
Prior to Recession, Starbucks Expanded Drive-Thrus
Starbucks and Ad Agency Part Ways
Starbucks iPhone Apps
Despite Store Cutbacks, Starbucks Retains Brand Portfolio
Seattle’s Best Coffee & Torrefazione Italia
Seattle’s Best Goes Franchise Route
Foodservice Operations Suffer Setback During Inhospitable Times
Burger King to Roll Out Seattle’s Best Nationally
Profitable Partnerships in Consumer Packaged Goods
Kraft Markets Starbucks’ Ground and Whole Bean Coffee
The North American Coffee Partnership
Via Rollout Ongoing
Transformation Agenda Fuels Energy Drinks
Nutritional Health & Wellness to Promote Corporate Health & Wellness
Social Responsibility as Practice and Marketing Tool
Employees vs. Starbucks: You Win Some, You Lose Some
Tazo Tea & Ethos Water
Table 7-4: Tazo Tea—List of Hot Tea Products as of December 2009
Ethos Water: PR Plus or Ethical Dilemma?
Other Partnerships, Other Products

Chapter 8: The Consumer
More than 50% of Americans Drink Coffee Daily
77% of Adults Drink Coffee Each Year
Consumer Love Affair with Gourmet Coffee Wanes a Bit
Consumption Among 18- to 24-Year-Olds Rebounds Slightly
Coffee Drinkers Know Home Isn’t Just Where the Heart Is
Brewing Method of Choice
Figure 8-1: How Consumers Get Their Morning Java Jolt, 2010 (percent)
Consumer Use and Demographics
The Simmons Survey System
Starbucks Restaurants Feel Recession Squeeze
Table 8-1a: Usage Rates for Starbucks Restaurants and Starbucks Packaged Coffee Products, 2006-2009 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 8-1b: Adult Consumer Base for Starbucks Restaurants and Starbucks Packaged Coffee Products, 2006-2009 (number of U.S. adults in millions)
Table 8-2a: Fast-Food Breakfast Consumers: Usage Rates Overall and for McDonald’s, Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts, 2005-2009 (percent of U.S. adults)
Table 8-2b: Fast-Food Breakfast Consumers: Consumer Base Overall and for McDonald’s, Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts, 2005-2009 (number of U.S. adults in millions)
Usage of Coffee by Type
Figure 8-2: Household Usage Rates of Coffee: By Product Type, 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Espresso/Cappuccino Has Youthful Demographic
Table 8-3a: Usage of Espresso/Cappuccino: By Household Age Group, 2009 (number in thousands, percent and index)
Table 8-3b: Usage of Ground/Whole Bean Coffee: By Household Age Group, 2009 (number in thousands, percent and index)
Types of Coffee Used Most
Figure 8-3: Coffee Usage Rates: By Product Type Most Often Used Per Household, 2009 (percent of U.S. Households)
Five-Year Trend by Types of Coffee Used
Table 8-4: Trended Number of Coffee Users: By Product Type Used Most Often, 2005-2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Demographic Indicators by Product Type
Regular
Ground Decaf
RTD Coffee Drinks
Instant Decaffeinated
Instant Specialty Flavored Coffee Mix
Whole Bean Coffee
Espresso/Cappuccino
Psychographics Reveal Unlikely Connection Between Flavored Mix & Whole Bean
Brands Usage Rates
Demographic Trends: Ground and Whole Bean Coffee Brands
Café Bustelo
Chock Full O’Nuts
Eight O’Clock
Folgers
Hills Brothers
Maxwell House
Yuban
Demographic Trends: Selected Espresso/Cappuccino Brands
Demographic Trends: Instant Coffee Brands
Demographic Trends: Instant Specialty Coffee Mix Brands
Demographic Trends: RTD Coffee Brands
Table 8-5: Top Demographic Indicators for Selected Types of Coffee 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-6a: Coffee Purchaser Food and Shopping Lifestyle Attitudes: By Selected Coffee Types, 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-6b: Coffee Purchaser Food and Shopping Lifestyle Attitudes: By Selected Coffee Types, 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-6c: Coffee Purchaser Food and Shopping Lifestyle Attitudes: By Selected Coffee Types, 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-7: Coffee Brands Used Most Often by Percentage of U.S Households, 2009 (percent of U.S. households)
Table 8-8: Top 10 Demographic Indicators for Selected Ground/Whole Bean Coffee Brands, 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-9: Top Demographic Indicators for Selected Espresso/Cappuccino Brands, 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-10: Top Demographic Indicators for Selected Instant Coffee Brands, 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-11: Top Demographic Indicators for Selected Instant Specialty Coffee Mix Brands, 2009 (index of U.S. households)
Table 8-12: Top 10 Demographic Indicators for Selected Ready-To-Drink (RTD) Coffee Brands, 2009 (index of U.S. households)

Appendix: Addresses of Selected Industry Associations, Marketers and Coffeehouse Chains

Coffee and Ready-to-Drink Coffee in the U.S.: The Market and Opportunities in Retail and Foodservice, 6th Edition now Available on ReportsandReports. ReportsandReports, comprising of an online library of 10,000 reports, in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets, and 25 industry specific websites.

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Bottled Water versus Water Treatment Systems for Home or Commercial Application

Bottled Water versus Water Treatment Systems for Home or Commercial Application

The rise in popularity of bottled water over the past 2 decades has been an interesting phenomenon. Companies selling bottled water have done a great job marketing it as healthy water, while selling it for approximately 5 cents an ounce versus tap water which costs less than 1 cent per gallon! Marketers of bottled water have convinced us that as compared to tap water, bottled water is pure, superior in taste and far more available.

In recent years, however, bottled water has come under fire as an increasing number of people have learned they’re drinking nothing more than filtered tap water. Coca-Cola’s Dasani and Pepsi’s Aquafina are two very popular examples of this, bottling their water close to their distribution points, rather than from sources we often associate with bottled water such as artesian aquifers or natural springs high up in the mountains.

People have also become aware of the environmental impact, namely the amount of oil required to produce plastic bottles and transport bottled water to your local grocer, not to mention that bottled water produces up to 1.5 million tons of plastic waste per year, with 80% of it simply thrown away instead of being recycled.  And if those weren’t reasons enough, there’s also the controversy surrounding the chemicals found to be leaching from the plastic bottles into the water. Bottled water doesn’t seem so healthy now.

So how do you change people’s perception of tap water, while also providing them with the security the masses have come to associate with bottled water? Install a whole house water filter or commercial water treatment system. Doing so will optimize water quality, help to minimize our reliance on natural resources such as oil and offset our impact on the environment in the transport and disposal of plastic bottles.

Benefits to installing a water treatment system for home or commercial applications include removing disagreeable tastes and odors, including objectionable chlorine, many chemicals and gases, and in some cases it can be effective against microorganisms. In particular, reverse osmosis is highly effective in removing up to 99% of contaminants in water. It removes several impurities from water such as total dissolved solids, turbidity, asbestos, lead and other toxic heavy metals, radium, and many dissolved organics. The process will also remove chlorinated pesticides and most heavier-weight VOCs.

Water treatment and reverse osmosis systems can be implemented for use in housing developments, cosmetic production, food processors, hospitals, remote area drinking water systems, and water stores, just to name a few. So next time you reach for a bottle of water, make sure it’s a reusable bottle (preferably stainless steel), and fill it up with delicious tap water recently purified by your water treatment or reverse osmosis system.

 

Dimewater is a water treatment manufacturer located north of San Diego. The company specializes in designing and constructing products to fit the needs of their customers. Additionally, Dime Water tests water to ensure proper equipment selection and fully tests all membrane-based products prior to shipment. The management team is “hands on” to ensure quality at all stages of design and production along with a familiarity of all products produced. To assist you in selecting the correct process to meet your water treatment needs, as well as receive a free quote, we encourage you to contact us at (760) 734-5798 or use our online request form at http://www.dimewater.com/Commercial-Water-Treatment-Quotation.

 

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How To Use Packaging To Promote Your Business

How To Use Packaging To Promote Your Business

What’s the use of having a great product, price, advertising campaign, and other elements of a marketing mix that work wonders for a marketer but that lacks good packaging and aesthetic appeal? Packaging is as important an element of the promotional mix as pricing, features, etc.

 

Packaging in itself consists of various factors that can help a marketer sell the product. In fact, many marketers understand the importance of packaging as it directly influences interest in the mind of a buyer and induces him or her to try out the product outside his or her normal buying pattern.

 

The packaging of a product can work wonders for the business by promoting the product through word of mouth, visual display of product, shelf promotion, etc.

 

Proper planning of packaging gives the product an aesthetic appeal, use of colors makes it attractive and shape may give it a curiosity factor. Safety and security of the product are concerns as well.

 

Packaging of a product will provide the marketer with an opportunity to present a way to capture a costumer’s attention. The product in itself may be of the best quality with the latest features and made available at the best price possible, but if sold without good, attractive packaging it may result in disaster for the company.

 

Some simple tips to include in the packaging of a product include the right packaging material, sustainability, vendor management for packaging, technology used, etc.

 

With growing awareness of green products among consumers, issues of manufacturers using the right packaging material has taken center stage.

 

What’s the use of providing customers with an environmentally friendly product in hazardous packaging?

 

Use colors that appeal to the target audience are culturally and morally acceptable and induce interest in the mind of a buyer. Color plays a very important role in packaging. It helps generate interest in the mind of buyer and gathers a lot of attention through its visual appeal. Many manufacturers use bright colors to induce buyers to have a look, some use transparent packaging to show the customers what’s inside the packing, and some use colors that go with their company logo.

 

For packaging to be effective, it has to be unique. It should differentiate itself from the competition and provide an edge over similar products available in the market using cost-effective methods.

 

To understand packaging and its complexities, a manufacturer should understand a typical consumer mind-set. Yes, every individual has different tastes, likes, and dislikes, but an overall view in a broader perspective makes it easy to understand which type of packaging should be used for what product. It’s important to understand what a consumer wants from the product, the kind of features it provides, and its appeal.

 

Effective packaging induces interest in the brand. This can be done by providing some value added through packaging. For example, an FMCG company manufacturing instant food items provided new recipes on the packaging, adding value to the product and its brand image. Effective packaging can help the overall brand image of the company by breaking through the many other options available on the shelf these days.

 

Promotional packaging has gained a lot of attention amongst manufacturers and consumers alike. Various promotional campaigns are printed inside or outside on the packaging, clearly distinguished by using attractive color, fonts, or graphics. It helps manufacturers reach across the target audience effectively, and consumers benefit through such offers, contests, sales, or discounts.

 

Packaging of a product can be made more effective also through various tie-ins, which help the product reach more audience and generate brand awareness.

 

Packaging is the answer to a question about a product’s value to a customer. Packaging will have to be interesting, unique, and beneficial to the customer.

 

Packaging has also changed over the years, where manufacturers used limited colors and graphics. Today, packaging is used in different ways to promote different product lines.

 

Direct mailing of samples or free items to potential customers, giving away free items along with a product, or using a mascot or celebrity to endorse a product, are way to effectively provide a good packaged product to customers.

 

Packaging a product in the right way essentially leads to building brand awareness, higher sales, and increased consumer confidence in the product, which contribute its life cycle.

Are you searching for wholesalers reviews, dropshipping directory, ebay tips and wholesale directory, find them at wholesaleforum.

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What’s All the Fuss – is Bottled Water Better Than Tap?

What’s All the Fuss – is Bottled Water Better Than Tap?

I’ve had people ask the question again and again, is bottled water better than tap?  It’s not any better for you really although some people have bought into the illusion that it is.  We tend to believe what we hear if it is repeated often enough, and in the beginning of this recent trend toward drinking bottled water the marketing for the product was very convincing.

The marketers would have you believe that what they were selling you was something pure, but it is in many cases no better than tap water.  In some cases it has actually proven to be worse.  That is because there is far less regulation over bottled than there is over water treated at your local treatment facilities.

In answer to is bottled water better than tap, let me ask you a question.  Would it come as any sort of surprise to you if I told you that just like the water treatment facilities there is an allowable limit for toxins?  That is why I say that in fact bottled is not any better for you than drinking regular water, because they’re basically the same thing.

There have actually been several recalls made over the years due to the fact that there was too high a level of certain dangerous chemicals found to be in bottled water with the most famous of these cases being Perrier.  The only reason that these cases are ever discovered is because of the regulations requiring that water traveling over state lines be tested.

That leads me to say about the question, is bottled water better than tap, that if it is delivered in the same state that it was manufactured in then most likely it’s not.  Many companies build manufacturing plants all over the country so that they can avoid having to produce results that the water in fact meets safe level standards.

Besides that, even if the water is tested as safe originally it may not be by the time that it gets to you.  That is because there are chemicals us in the process of manufacturing plastic bottles called phthalates that will leech off into the water that the bottle contains.  Phthalates are known to cause cancer.

So, now what is your opinion so far as is bottled water better than tap?  Have you become convinced that a better way to be sure that your water is free of dangerous contaminants is to purify the water yourself?

This is truly the best way to keep your family safe from the many ills that contaminants in the water can bestow upon you.  A home water purification system will allow you the power to make sure that the water that your loved ones are drinking is clean and pure.

Bob Goodhand is an advocate for home and personal water purification systems to protect and promote healthy living. Visit his site at http://natural-purified-water.com/

to discover the drinking water filters that Bob recommends.

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