‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video wins ‘pop’ular vote






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/27/2014 3:50:44 PM





 

Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day

 

To celebrate the 14th Annual Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day, Sealed Air Corp. has announced that Eric Buss and his ‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video have been voted by Bubble Wrap fans as the first-ever inductee into the official Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame located on BubbleWrapFun.com.

 

“We are proud to kick-off the inaugural year of the Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame by honoring Eric Buss and his amazing ‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video as our first ever inductee, as it most exemplifies the passion, fun and creative uses of our iconic packaging material,” says Rohn Shellenberger, business manager for Sealed Air’s Product Care division. “On a day where millions around the globe celebrate Bubble Wrap brand’s invention, Buss’ video represents what this holiday is all about and we are excited to watch him ride his Bubble Wrap Bike straight into the Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame.”

 

Buss won not only the hearts of fans, but also induction into the Hall of Fame by shooting a video in which he creatively fastens a roll of Bubble Wrap brand cushioning in front of the wheel of his bike to make a continuous stream of “pops” as he rides over it. His video rose to “pop”ularity earlier this year, as it amassed more than 1.5 million views on YouTube. Sealed Air selected three finalists for consideration in the Hall of Fame’s inaugural year, including fantastic runners up ‘JoJo’s Bubble Wrap Praise Break’ and ‘Cat vs. Bubble Wrap.’

 

“I love popping Bubble Wrap material as much as anyone… but doing it with my fingers is way too slow for my taste,” Buss says. “I thought, ‘I need more noise, faster.’ What a great country we live in… I’m being awarded for popping Bubble Wrap material with a bike!”

 

In addition to Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day immortality, Eric will be awarded a giant bale of commemorative Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame Bubble Wrap brand protective cushioning. Fans can visit the new Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame at www.BubbleWrapFun.com.


More on Bubble Wrap and Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day
Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day is celebrated every year on the last Monday in January.

 

The originally intended use for Bubble Wrap was entirely different than how it is used today. Inventors Marc Chavannes and Al Fielding originally developed a plastic they hoped to market as textured wallpaper. When that idea did not take off, the inventors began to have some success marketing the product as a greenhouse insulator.

 

Chavannes then realized that Bubble Wrap brand cushioning could be used as an improvement from paper and old newspapers for cushioning fragile items. Once the opportunity was identified, the inventors worked hard on the manufacturing process for Bubble Wrap cushioning in an effort to create an ideal packaging material. After a lot of tinkering, they developed a special, proprietary barrier protection which prevented air from leaking and resulted in the crisp “Pop” that Bubble Wrap brand is famous for.

 

Source: Sealed Air Corp.

 

 

 

 

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Top trends for 2014






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The new year presents opportunities for packaging, if you know where to focus. Hear where leading packaging executives will direct their efforts.


Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/16/2014 4:40:05 PM





Meet the new trends; same as the old trends—but with some twists and nuances.

Packaging Digest tapped into the mind trust of our editorial advisory board to discover what trends some of them see that will have the most impact on their packaging decisions in the coming year (see “Our expert panelists” below). 

Hear what they have to say about sustainability, collaboration, cost savings, competition, health and wellness, authenticity, differentiation and communicating to the consumer.

 

Our expert panelists
• Oliver Campbell, Director, Worldwide Procurement, Packaging & Packaging Engineering, Dell

• Kim Carswell, Group Manager, Owned Brands Packaging, Target

• Joe Hotchkiss, Director, Michigan State University, School of Packaging and Center for Packaging Innovation and Sustainability

• Joe Keller, Section Head, Packaging Development, Global Packaging Sustainability, The Procter & Gamble Co.

• Peter Macauley, Director, Global Packaging & Sustainability, Abbott Laboratories

• Michael Okoroafor, VP-Packaging R&D/Innovation, H.J. Heinz

• Ron Sasine, Senior Director of Packaging, Private Brands, Wal-Mart

 

 

Dell straw pulp boxDell’s new wheat straw packaging is an example of innovating by improving packaging performance at a lower cost while advancing sustainable initiatives.

 

Packaging Digest: What market trends are you seeing and how are they impacting packaging?

Campbell: In the tech industry, we see more demand for sustainable or green packaging among our customers. Ernst & Young has a recent statistic that the largest category of shareholder proxy activity is for sustainability, at 38 percent, and that is up about three times from several years ago. I’d say that’s a market trend around sustainability—as well as a societal trend that we see in government regulation from Australian packaging regulations and Canada take-backs. 

The trend in sustainable packaging is being backed up by investment in research and new factories. The industry is walking the talk. It makes me feel good about the future.

Continued supply chain efficiency is another trend within Dell. For packaging, it’s is how can we get smaller packages while maintaining quality and providing a better customer experience.

One final trend is the programs being structured around 2020 initiatives. Dell just launched our Legacy of Good Initiative. We have 20 different 2020 goals focused on the environment, communities, and people. Our zero waste packaging for 2020 is among those. What that means is all Dell packaging by 2020 will be either recyclable or compostable, plus it has to be sustainably sourced.

 

Keller: I’m in hair care now at Procter & Gamble. It’s a fairly fast-paced category. We’re seeing a lot more competition on every level in our businesses. So we’re continuing to look at how to use packaging to differentiate our products—whether that’s through more sustainable packing options or decoration techniques, those types of things.

 

Where’s the additional competition coming from? Is it local or global? What are the drivers?

Keller: The competition is more new start-up brands. They wouldn’t necessarily be global, but sometimes they are. Even local, small brands are trying to offer something new to the consumer. 

As P&G, we need to continue to show why we are different, what do we bring to the consumer—and packaging obviously is a key driver in that because it’s right there at the shelf.

 

So you need to show the value proposition of your products. How is that going to translate on the packaging side?

Keller: Our advertising channels have changed vs where they were 10, 15, 20 years ago. That will drive more importance on making sure we stand out on the shelf. It helps to communicate the quality proposition we have to the consumer. It’s pushing us to rely more on the packaging to do that.

The need to differentiate still drives a lot of packaging projects. Mike, Heinz recently came out with a new plastic bottle to better differentiate on the shelf. What can you tell us about it?

Okoroafor: The consumer motivation for redesigning our bottle was twofold: to differentiate and to provide better ergonomics. 

Since Heinz came up with upside-down bottle, everybody has copied us. So when you look at the store shelf for ketchup bottles, they look the same. Packaging should be your biggest media. If everybody looks like you, there’s no differentiation. 

We wanted to design a plastic bottle that would maintain the iconic impression of the Heinz glass bottle, but offer better differentiation on the shelf. The new bottle is called the thunderbolt design, like the Thunderbird car that Ford came up with. 

We also wanted to design a bottle that everybody can hold and squeeze without any difficulty. The new ergonomic design allowed us to reduce the weight of the bottle without sacrificing the strength. In a compression test, the top load is actually slightly better than the original one because of this smart design.

When it comes to packaging design development, while we address emerging markets outside of this country, we also have to address emerging channels in this country. People who immigrate to the U.S. become an emerging channel. Near Lancaster, PA, one of the biggest restaurants is a Peruvian restaurant. Why is that? A lot of Latino people from Peru are in that area. Which means we have to think about how we’ll deliver the food or the beverage-and your delivery vehicle is your package.

 

What is the implication for packaging because of emerging channels? Is it using a structure that they’re familiar with? Is it graphics? Is it all that?

Okoroafor: It is all of that. But the point you make about structure is critical because that way you can make it more affordable. For instance, I can offer you ketchup in a plastic bottle or, same quality, in a pouch. In the emerging market, like Brazil, they love the pouch. So for them, it doesn’t mean less quality. As long as your shelf life is the same and we try to do that through science.

But you also have to think about merchandising. Your package has to do more than just to protect. That merchandising means that you have to come up with winning graphics.

 

Carswell: From a retailer perspective, health and wellness is definitely a trend. And when it comes to packaging, we are continuing to push the envelope in a sustainability space more. We expect to keep doing that because the consumers in the store are looking for that more than they were five, 10 years ago—and will probably look even more for it in the future.
The things that we’ve done in the past that we know are good for the environment—like less packaging, make it more recyclable, make it recycled content-are understood by consumers. The things they might start to understand are use of renewable materials and other second-tier improvements to the package design.

 

Okoroafor: Sustainability is here to stay. Obviously, people don’t want to be asked to pay for sustainability, but it is your key to the consumer’s door. Without that, you’re not entering.

 

Sasine: Where we’re really making a good deal of progress is linking our sustainability efforts farther up into our supply chain. We began eight years ago with a great deal of effort around sustainable packaging and made some large commitments and were able to deliver on those earlier this year. (See www.packagingdigest.com/Walmartgoal.)

What we’ve found is we can make similar progress with suppliers of all the products we sell and not just in packaging-by putting out some tools that people can use, particularly our buyers as they make decisions about products. Our sustainability index is now rolled out across all of our categories and buyers are using it as they analyze products. 

It’s had an interesting impact on us in packaging. It’s creating additional visibility into cost and—by packing and shipping more efficiently—how we can drive costs and continue to maintain that sort of customer-focused cost reduction that Wal-Mart is famous for. For us, sustainability has always been an objective and we’ve always strived to connect sustainability to our ability to deliver everyday low prices. We’re starting to see that come to fruition in a lot more of our categories in a very meaningful way. It’s been an opportunity to do the right thing and cut our costs at the same time.

 

Macauley: I would echo a lot of the same items when we talk about sustainability, but I will take a different tact and talk more about healthcare. Think pharma, think med devices, think nutrition. 

Healthcare hasn’t had the same kind of sustainability pressure points as the CPG brands. It’s starting to get a much better awareness and push. We’re seeing sustainability drive more design efforts. A lot of that can simply be, within a hospital setting, how do we increase our ability to recycle? 

From a packaging designer’s point of view, we are starting to look at how we can help our customers separate the packaging for reuse or for recyclability. 

A second trend we’ve had for a while is an increased amount of collaboration. Ron pointed to it, as well—going upstream. We are clearly working better across our overall value chain and generating more aligned sustainability metrics, which is still a missing link.

 

Hotchkiss: One of the emerging issues you’re going to hear more about is the role of packaging in food waste. The issue of how much of a product doesn’t get sold for whatever reason is becoming a day-to-day driver.

I use the analogy that packaging is like bridge building. Anybody can design a bridge that absolutely guaranteed will not collapse. The problem is that no one could afford to use it. A good bridge builder builds a bridge that just barely doesn’t collapse. That’s the optimum. And that’s the same thing in packaging, getting the right amount of barrier so the product shelf life is just right.

 

Okoroafor: One of the biggest trends we see is…You have to design for affordability. But affordability doesn’t mean cheap. You have to make sure your packaging is affordable for these consumer demographics: the struggling, the middle class and the affluent. 

It means you have to rethink how you innovate. You have to innovate for growth and productivity so you can make your product available at the lowest possible cost while you still make your margins.

 

Macauley: As we strive for new innovation, there’s sometimes going to be a cost impact. Do consumers understand that?

A missing link is, where is new technology in terms of its lifecycle to provide new solutions? Take biopolymers, for example. Biopolymers have been discussed and are rolling out, but are they at the level where we feel they should be today vs what we thought they were going to be five years ago? To provide those sustainability solutions—if it’s not a reduction; if it’s more renewable type materials—there’s sometimes going to be a cost impact. Can we pass that on to our consumers or not? The feedback so far is “not.” 

Keller: There is more pressure to drive costs out of the system and be especially conscious of capital and making that stretch as far as it can. We only have certain amounts of money. Sometimes we’re going to choose to put it towards packaging or capital and sometimes we’re going to choose to put it in other places. I haven’t seen any major shifts from what I’m seeing on costs other than just the increase in focus on it.

 

Campbell: At Dell, we’re focused on cost reduction primarily through innovation. As a tech company, innovation is part of our DNA and we tap into the resident brainpower in the company to come up with smarter solutions. The use of the term cost reduction is almost a disservice because if you look at innovation through the lens of value creation, you get to different points. Can you do the same thing at lower cost or can you do something better at lower cost, which is an improvement in value for our customers? A great example of where we’re doing something at lower cost but better performance is our new wheat straw packaging. Our supplier just dedicated a $50 million plant in China [in October 2013]. Yes, investments are being made where they’re smart and yield better customer value.

 

Keller: One of the things we’re looking for, too, is what we consider “platform” ways to reduce costs. What we look for from suppliers is, how can we leverage technology across our different products and not just in one specific area? That’s something we always look to leverage given the focus on resources with our company and trying to be more efficient with not only our money, but our people.

 

Carswell: If you can share your strategic views early to inform and influence your supply chain partner’s direction in their capital investment, it’s huge. Maybe certain projects could advance or other ones could be quickly killed. That helps with the cost equation vs thinking it’s about the pennies on the unit you’re talking about.

 

Campbell: That’s a good point. We tied our wheat straw back into a social trend in China. This is what’s made it so compelling. A lot of the air pollution in China is from burning of agricultural waste, such as rice and wheat straw. Now we’re creating an application which creates a market for what was formerly waste. When you do those types of things, and it saves money, it becomes much easier to justify the capital investments.

 

Sasine: One of the things Wal-Mart has been spending a good deal of time looking at over the past few months is the revitalization of American manufacturing. As the market for manufactured products and consumer opportunities grows in the U.S., there’s also going to be an upstream demand for packaging, components and other materials that go into providing that finished product. A good deal of capital investment opportunity will be tied to that. 

It’s encouraging more local supply for product as manufacturing comes back into some of our communities. Lots of towns were known for what they made. That sort of community-centered manufacturing is set for a rebound in the U.S. That ties back into cost. Clearly the cost of transportation is a critical part of what’s eventually paid at the checkout by consumers. The cost of labor in many of these markets around the world is also a part of that component. When all of the pieces get added together, we’re seeing that local manufacturing in many parts across the U.S. is becoming more competitive. That makes it an important time to consider packaging reinvestment.

 

Hotchkiss: Cost reduction is always a driver. But people are looking at it much broader because it’s not just the cost of the primary container that you’ve got to focus on. You’ve got to focus on logistics, supply chain, all of the costs that go with distributing products. You’ve got to focus on costs in terms of product loss. You’ve got to focus on costs of your consumers. If you put a cheaper package out there but it drives 10 percent of your consumers away, you haven’t done the company any good at all.

 

Okoroafor: [Going back to trends,] an emerging trend I see is consumer interactivity—using mobile devices to communicate with the consumer. 

That interactivity encompasses everything from personalization to communicating directly, one-on-one with the consumer. And packaging becomes your trigger for that virtual communication. 

Look at the emergence of NFC, near field communication. You could be walking down the ketchup aisle and a package would tell you “I’m now zero calorie” or “Please buy me. I’m on sale.” The packaging is triggering it because of printed electronics. Goods can interact with mobile devices. I see this trend going into the future for a long time. Watch out for printed electronics.

 

Do you think printed electronics is going to be done at the supplier level, or do you see it as something that brand owners are going to do online, on the fly, to get additional levels of personalization?

Okoroafor: The initial idea of going into printed electronics was so people can deliver it online quick, easy, low cost. Ultimately, I think brand owners will be doing it. Because I want to be able to do personalization as fast as my current mass production. And that is a reality with printed electronics. It’ll be just like printing with your inkjet printer.

 

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PUJOLASOS develops Visoanska Source Premiere’s cap






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/10/2014 3:51:51 PM





PUJOLASOS

 

Latest Pujolasos launch is a beech wood cap. It has been specially developed for Visoanka Source Premiere. “Our customer wanted a component similar to its formulas: natural, innovative and efficient. This is what we offered while developing this smooth and perfectly tight cap.” says Isabel Pujolasos, sales director of the company.

“Prodigiously efficient and with an optimal tolerance for both the face and the eyes, SOURCE PREMIERE frees the skin from the impurities and removes the makeup, even waterproo,f” explains Visoanska. “Our formula is enriched with prebiotics, minerals and oligo-elements that restore and durably protect the integrity of the cutaneous ecosystem and inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. Dermo-soothing, the application of SOURCE PREMIERE reveals a purified, smoothed glowing skin with vibrant complexion.” A similar effect to Pujolasos cap finish.

In the heart of Catalonia, Pujolasos has been offering wood components for almost half a century to perfumery and cosmetics premium and masstige brands.

 

Source: Pujolasos

 

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PUJOLASOS develops Visoanska Source Premiere’s cap






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/10/2014 3:51:51 PM





PUJOLASOS

 

Latest Pujolasos launch is a beech wood cap. It has been specially developed for Visoanka Source Premiere. “Our customer wanted a component similar to its formulas: natural, innovative and efficient. This is what we offered while developing this smooth and perfectly tight cap.” says Isabel Pujolasos, sales director of the company.

“Prodigiously efficient and with an optimal tolerance for both the face and the eyes, SOURCE PREMIERE frees the skin from the impurities and removes the makeup, even waterproo,f” explains Visoanska. “Our formula is enriched with prebiotics, minerals and oligo-elements that restore and durably protect the integrity of the cutaneous ecosystem and inhibits the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. Dermo-soothing, the application of SOURCE PREMIERE reveals a purified, smoothed glowing skin with vibrant complexion.” A similar effect to Pujolasos cap finish.

In the heart of Catalonia, Pujolasos has been offering wood components for almost half a century to perfumery and cosmetics premium and masstige brands.

 

Source: Pujolasos

 

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Almost half of U.S. households have access to carton recycling






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/9/2014 6:56:14 PM





 

Carton recyclingTwo thousand and thirteen marked a year of significant expansion of carton recycling. Thanks to collaborative industry efforts and support from communities nationwide, 48 percent of U.S. households now have access to carton recycling. Meeting the Carton Council of North America’s goals for 2013, access increased by 16.4 percent and expanded from 43 to 45 U.S. states. 

The Carton Council, a group of carton manufacturers united to deliver long-term collaborative solutions in order to divert valuable cartons from the landfill, credits this exceptional growth to voluntary private and public collaboration that includes industry companies and organizations, recycling facilities and local governments. Since 2009, the Carton Council has focused efforts on building infrastructure and improving access to carton recycling nationwide. At that time, just 18 percent of U.S. households had access to carton recycling. Currently, 56.1 million U.S. households have access to recycle cartons. 

“We are proud of the progress made in 2013,” says Jason Pelz, vp, environment, Tetra Pak North America, and vp of recycling projects for the Carton Council of North America. “Carton recycling access has increased 160 percent in just four years. School-aged children are learning about the importance of recycling their milk and juice cartons as part of their larger contribution to the environment, and are then taking these lessons home to their parents. Citizens, who are buying more food and drinks in cartons than ever before, now have more ways to recycle these containers. Communities are treating cartons as ‘must recycle’ items. All of these are examples of the huge strides made, working together in a collaborative way.” 

A number of large-sized communities added carton recycling in 2013, including Tampa, FL.; Memphis, TN; and Columbus, OH. In total, 7.9 million households gained access in 2013. As more communities have expanded their recycling programs to include cartons, the Carton Council has also launched a series of comprehensive public education campaigns to get the word out to local residents. The campaigns have included direct mail, television public service announcements, advertisements in local newspapers, and community event outreach, along with online digital ads and social media activities.

2013 Carton Campaign Communities where CCNA ran education campaigns. (The list of communities added is much longer.)
Columbia, S.C.
Columbus, Ohio
Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas
Des Moines, Iowa
Lansing, Mich.
Memphis, Tenn.
Tampa, Fla.
Twin Cities, Minn.

“We expect access to continue to expand in 2014 as more recycling and waste management industry professionals, as well as local governments, recognize the value of cartons and the ease by which they can be added to their community’s recycling program.” Pelz says. “We also want to make more Americans aware that cartons are recyclable and will continue our efforts on broadening awareness in 2014.”

Additionally, the industry has been taking notice of the strides made to improve access to carton recycling:

• In August, the California Product Stewardship Council (CPSC) awarded the Carton Council with the 2013 Bow and Arrow Award for Coalition Building to recognize efforts in building strong, effective partnerships not only between competitors in carton manufacturing, but also across the entire recycling supply chain with recycling professionals, sorting facilities and paper mills. 

• The Carton Council was also recognized by the State of Texas Alliance for Recycling (STAR) in November with its 2013 Outstanding Recycling Partnership Award. 

Made mainly from paper, a renewable resource, lightweight and compact in design and with a low carbon footprint, cartons have proven to be a sustainable packaging solution that is growing in use for a variety of liquid and food products. Including cartons as an accepted material in every curbside recycling program offers a better, more cost-efficient option than other proposed recovery solutions.

The Carton Council currently has a campaign designed to help counties and municipalities, as well as recyclers, bring carton recycling to their residents. For more information, visit www.CartonOpportunities.org

Source: The Carton Council

 

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Miller Lite releases limited-edition Original Lite Can






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 12/11/2013 2:17:50 PM





 

Original Light Can from Miller Lite

 

Miller Lite, the beer that launched the light beer category, invites consumers to reach for a piece of brewing history. On January 1, 2014, Miller Lite will release the limited-edition Original Lite Can, an updated version of the iconic packaging that changed the beer industry almost 40 years ago.

The Original Lite Can features the familiar images of hops, barley and the words “a fine pilsner beer,” which reinforce the high quality ingredients and the unique brewing process that consumers have enjoyed for generations.

“There was a time when all that existed was heavy beer that weighed you down,” says Elina Vives, marketing director for Miller Lite. “The launch of Miller Lite broke this category convention and offered beer drinkers the best of both worlds, great taste at only 96 calories and 3.2 carbs. Miller Lite is the original light beer and this limited-edition can celebrates that innovation and helps inform consumers of the rich history behind our beer.”

 

In addition to becoming available to consumers in January, the Original Lite Can will appear in the upcoming Paramount Pictures’ release, Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues. The news team can be seen enjoying the Original Lite in the film, which will be released nationwide December 18.

 

The limited-edition Original Lite Can will be available nationwide January through March in 12-, 16- and 24-ounce sizes.

 

Follow @MillerLite on Twitter and follow the conversation using #TheOriginal. For more information about the Original Lite Can, visit www.MillerLite.com and www.Facebook.com/MillerLite.

 

Source: Miller Lite

 

 

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Packagers meet food safety challenges with SQF certification






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 9/27/2013 9:54:17 AM





 

SCS Global Services

 

 

In the wake of growing demand by retailers and major food brands, food packaging companies are stepping up their efforts to satisfy customers by seeking Safe Quality Food (SQF) certification. Speaking Tuesday at Pack Expo 2013, Chip Wood, director of food and agriculture business development for SCS Global Services (SCS), described multiple factors driving food packagers toward this globally-recognized level of food safety certification, then walked the audience step-by-step through the process.

 

“As the packaging industry gears itself up for SQF, the world’s most widely recognized Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) level certification, industry members should be well acquainted with the rigors of the program as well as the opportunities it represents,” Wood says.

 

Citing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Wood identified the top four food problems -deficient employee training, contamination of raw materials, poor plant and equipment sanitation, and poor plant design and construction. He then explained key components of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), sweeping food safety legislation signed into law in 2011, and described how each of these components are addressed under the SQF program.

 

“The FSMA’s formula of audits, prevention, compliance, and response is comprehensively addressed within SQF,” he adds. “It provides a systematic approach to employee training, inspections, mandatory recalls, record access and administrative detention, product traceability, and laboratory testing.”

 

In addition to new regulations and buyer specifications, he listed additional factors driving a growing number of food packaging companies to get SQF-trained and certified. These factors include growing awareness of the risks posed by food-borne illness, knowledge of the increased virulence of some pathogens, better detection capabilities, global supply chain issues, protection of reputation, and reduced quality assurance costs.

 

According to Wood, SCS offers a full suite of SQF food safety services. These services include: fully-accredited SQF training; pre-certification exercises which enable companies to undergo mock audits and determine their readiness levels; an extensive SQF consultant network to help companies navigate the terrain; and top-level SQF auditing and certification covering all food categories. HACCP training classes specifically geared to the packaging industry are already being scheduled for early 2014.

 

SCS Global Services (SCS) has been a global leader in third-party environmental and sustainability certification, auditing, testing and standards development for three decades. SCS programs span a wide cross-section of sectors, recognizing exemplary performance in natural resource management, green building, product manufacturing, food and agriculture, retailing and more. In addition to food products, SCS certifies sustainably grown cut flowers and plants.

 

Source: SCS Global Services


 

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Finelite wins RPA 2nd Annual Excellence in Reusable Packaging Award






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 9/26/2013 11:53:43 AM





Reusable Packaging Association’s second annual Excellence in Reusable Packaging AwardFinelite is the winner of the Reusable Packaging Association’s second annual Excellence in Reusable Packaging Award. The winner was announced and the award was presented at PACK EXPO in Las Vegas.

 

Finelite designs and manufactures high performance, environmentally sustainable lighting solutions and products for commercial, educational, and healthcare facilities. The company makes pervasive use of many types of reusables for storing and handling parts, and for shipping materials between its factory in Union City, CA and its strategic partners in Livermore, CA and China. The reusable solutions include tarps, straight-wall stackable plastic crates, plastic collapsible containers, and trays. In addition, racking systems are used throughout its warehouse. All of the company’s reusable products have been carefully designed to reduce waste and support lean manufacturing.

 

Finelite produces more than 25 product lines and the longest light fixture is 144 in. x 12 in. x 4 in. and weighs 18 pounds. 

 

By using reusables, Finelite has achieved the following results:

 

Annual cost savings:

• 53% ($9,100) cost savings by replacing shrink-wrap with reusable tarps
• 40% ($8,400) material cost savings and 130 hours of labor by replacing corrugated boxes with reusable/collapsible bulk containers and straight-wall crates.
• $10,800 cost savings in LED packaging material (bubble wrap and anti-static wrap) and 350 hours of labor saved by eliminating un-wrapping the packaging material.

 

Annual environmental savings:

• Eliminated 436 miles/6,000 pounds of plastic shrink-wrap
• Eliminated 14,700 pounds of corrugated cartons
• Eliminated 4,200 pounds of bubble wrap

 

Ongoing benefits:

• Both the containers and crates are stackable, allowing vertical storage of material and freeing up valuable real estate.
• The volume of each straight wall crate is used to its entirety and enables 20% more material to be packaged when compared to the previous corrugated box packaging.
• Crates are easily fed into the assembly lines for operators to consume. Operators can work with the material from their own crate supply.
• Capacity for materials in the collapsible containers is 10% more than corrugated boxes.
• Empty containers are collapsed, allowing for efficient storage.

 

“We use reusables because they deliver cost savings in materials and labor. In our experience, we break even on our initial investment of reusable systems within 2 years, and then the savings continue to accrue long after that,” said Ana Koo, industrial engineer, Finelite, Inc. “In contrast, disposable packaging materials have a short life span and represent an ongoing expense. We are honored to be recognized for our efforts, and we applaud the RPA for creating this award program to bring more attention to the value of reusables.”

 

Finelite’s first reusable initiative replaced pallets and shrink wrap with stackable racks throughout Finelite’s factory and at two strategic-partner facilities in Livermore, CA. The light fixture components are manufactured in Livermore, and packaged into the racks. The racks are then transported to the paint supplier (also in Livermore). After painting, the components are re-packaged into the same racks, and shipped to Finelite for final assembly. The racks are transferred into Finelite’s inventory system. As inventory is used up, racks become available and they are backhauled, empty, to Livermore, ready for the next cycle.

 

“Finelite is a great example of a company that recognizes the hard savings enabled by reusables, and continually looks for new applications within its manufacturing and assembly areas,” said Robert Engle, Chairman of the RPA Board and CEO of Otto Environmental Systems North America. “They also demonstrate the innovation of reusable suppliers. No matter what the size, complexity, or material of the product being handled, reusable suppliers can develop right-fit reusable systems that protect products, enable efficiencies in material handling, and deliver cost savings.”

 

Source: Reusable Packaging Association

 

 

 

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H.B. Fuller invests in Packaging Center of Excellence






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 9/20/2013 9:58:05 AM





 

H.B. Fuller Customer Collaboration Center

 

Adhesives represent less than three percent of the total packaging cost, but can have a big impact on a brand’s reputation when it comes to consumer experience. The effect can be so substantial that executives at H.B. Fuller Company  have decided to invest in a Packaging Center of Excellence in North America to address customers packaging adhesives needs across a broad range of applications, substrates and environmental conditions. Upon its opening in early 2014, the Packaging Center of Excellence will be H.B. Fuller’s fourth center focused specifically on customer collaboration.

 

With its wide variety and industry-leading packaging adhesive offerings, H.B. Fuller provides the full breadth and depth of adhesives and engineering services for end-of-line packaging, container labeling, flexible packaging, retail-ready packaging, handle and packaging reinforcement and specialty packaging. Along with the robust offering, the new Packaging Center of Excellence will further enable collaboration efforts to help brands continue to advance their packaging designs.

 

“Packaging heavily influences consumer buying decisions and with the rise of social media, all it takes is one negative experience to put brands on the defensive,” says Peter Petrulo, business director of packaging, North America, at H.B. Fuller. “As experts in packaging adhesives, it’s our role to help protect our customer’s product and ensure end-users have a positive experience with our customer’s brand. That means staying on top of industry trends so we can meet our customers’ evolving business needs for safety, sustainability, efficiency and new packaging applications.”

 

Petrulo went on to say that H.B. Fuller is dedicated to advancing adhesive technology for the packaging industry, so the company is continually evolving and reformulating products for customers. H.B. Fuller’s most recent development includes the reformulation of its adhesive coated technologies (formerly known as Adalis) Sesame technology. The reformulated adhesives offer a much wider operating window and improved bond strength, allowing customers to continue to run efficiently, despite potential variation in their own processes.

 

Additionally, H.B. Fuller prides itself on working with all original equipment manufacturers to ensure compatible adhesive technologies even as equipment evolves. For example, the company has been credited for helping to engineer end-of-line packaging adhesives to serve today’s new on-demand, tankless hot melt systems. With an ability to run and perform on any hot melt system, H.B. Fuller’s hot melt adhesives are being used by manufacturers who have adopted equipment such as the Nordson Freedom and Graco Invisipac systems. These hot melt adhesives – designed to run smoothly on all the latest engineered fluid dispensing equipment – offer superior bond strength and fiber tear and excellent non-blocking, free-flowing properties.

 

To show its commitment to flexible packaging and to expand the Flextra line, H.B. Fuller acquired Plexbond Quimica S/A, to help better serve the flexible packaging market in South America. This acquisition will allow convertors to address the market’s evolving needs while providing a greater array of products and services to the region.

Source: H.B. Fuller

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Resealing capabilities






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 9/18/2013 6:33:43 PM





 

Resealing capabilities

 

The PrimePeel peel-and-reclose process allows packages to be easily opened and reclosed while maintaining the integrity of the contents. It helps preserve perishable food items such as produce, cheese, and cookies, and other products like cleansing wipes. A pressure-sensitive adhesive label is used with LaserSharp technology. When designing the opening, the laser-scored pattern is not limited to any shape or size, giving the flexibility to create a specific pattern to meet specific packaging needs. The peel and reclose process is suitable for a variety of film structures and packaging types, including trays, stand-up pouches and pillow pouches. For convenience, an easy-open pull-tab is added to the package.

LaserSharp FlexPack Services, 651-789-8800
www.flexpakservices.com
Pack Expo 2013 Booth #C-4440







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