‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video wins ‘pop’ular vote






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 1/27/2014 3:50:44 PM





 

Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day

 

To celebrate the 14th Annual Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day, Sealed Air Corp. has announced that Eric Buss and his ‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video have been voted by Bubble Wrap fans as the first-ever inductee into the official Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame located on BubbleWrapFun.com.

 

“We are proud to kick-off the inaugural year of the Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame by honoring Eric Buss and his amazing ‘Bubble Wrap Bike’ video as our first ever inductee, as it most exemplifies the passion, fun and creative uses of our iconic packaging material,” says Rohn Shellenberger, business manager for Sealed Air’s Product Care division. “On a day where millions around the globe celebrate Bubble Wrap brand’s invention, Buss’ video represents what this holiday is all about and we are excited to watch him ride his Bubble Wrap Bike straight into the Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame.”

 

Buss won not only the hearts of fans, but also induction into the Hall of Fame by shooting a video in which he creatively fastens a roll of Bubble Wrap brand cushioning in front of the wheel of his bike to make a continuous stream of “pops” as he rides over it. His video rose to “pop”ularity earlier this year, as it amassed more than 1.5 million views on YouTube. Sealed Air selected three finalists for consideration in the Hall of Fame’s inaugural year, including fantastic runners up ‘JoJo’s Bubble Wrap Praise Break’ and ‘Cat vs. Bubble Wrap.’

 

“I love popping Bubble Wrap material as much as anyone… but doing it with my fingers is way too slow for my taste,” Buss says. “I thought, ‘I need more noise, faster.’ What a great country we live in… I’m being awarded for popping Bubble Wrap material with a bike!”

 

In addition to Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day immortality, Eric will be awarded a giant bale of commemorative Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame Bubble Wrap brand protective cushioning. Fans can visit the new Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day Hall of Fame at www.BubbleWrapFun.com.


More on Bubble Wrap and Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day
Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day is celebrated every year on the last Monday in January.

 

The originally intended use for Bubble Wrap was entirely different than how it is used today. Inventors Marc Chavannes and Al Fielding originally developed a plastic they hoped to market as textured wallpaper. When that idea did not take off, the inventors began to have some success marketing the product as a greenhouse insulator.

 

Chavannes then realized that Bubble Wrap brand cushioning could be used as an improvement from paper and old newspapers for cushioning fragile items. Once the opportunity was identified, the inventors worked hard on the manufacturing process for Bubble Wrap cushioning in an effort to create an ideal packaging material. After a lot of tinkering, they developed a special, proprietary barrier protection which prevented air from leaking and resulted in the crisp “Pop” that Bubble Wrap brand is famous for.

 

Source: Sealed Air Corp.

 

 

 

 

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Shipping Strawberries in Corrugated Saves $6.6 Million Over Shipping In RPCs

Shipping fresh strawberries in corrugated containers costs 13% less than shipping the same volume of strawberries in reusable plastic containers (RPCs), according to a new economic case study. In the case scenario studied, an annual savings of $6.6 million was realized by shipping the strawberries in corrugated versus RPCs.

A large strawberry grower in Salinas, California, provided actual data to populate a cost analysis tool, which analyzed total annual system costs. The case study compared the costs involved in using corrugated containers vs. RPCs to ship 144 million pounds of strawberries to Cincinnati, Ohio.

The analysis shows that RPCs incur $12 million higher trucking and handling costs than corrugated, due to RPC backhaul trip requirements, handling costs at return distribution centers (DC), plus washing costs, and higher trucking costs from farm to retailer to DC. The return trip for RPCs, which includes additional handling, trucking and washing, adds $8.3 million in costs that are entirely avoided by using corrugated containers. At an estimated $0.10 per container, washing alone adds $1.6 million to the annual cost of using RPCs.

Corrugated containers do not require backhauling because they are recovered for recycling after use at retailer locations. Supermarkets and retailers have helped propel corrugated recovery to an impressive 91% in 2012, and they earn revenue from the sale of used corrugated. Corrugated has long been the most recycled packaging material in the world.

The system cost savings from using corrugated containers is spread across supply-chain stakeholders. A study of the data using a special rental analysis module in the software shows that, in a typical leasing arrangement, the retailer pays $4.6 million (13%) more to receive the strawberries shipped in RPCs as opposed to corrugated. The grower pays $3.8 million (40%) more to ship in RPCs. So both growers and retailers save money when corrugated containers are used to ship strawberries in this case scenario.

Examining the relative costs and benefits of shipping-container alternatives requires a deep dive into all the cost factors involved along the supply chain. Case studies, like this one, detail the impact of major cost sensitivity factors on the total distribution system. They are significant, when considered on an annual basis. Shipping container economics now present a clear picture that corrugated containers offer the lowest-cost supply-chain solution.

The Strawberry Case Study is available for download on the Corrugated Packaging Alliance website (www.corrugated.org).

The Corrugated Packaging Alliance (CPA) is a corrugated industry initiative, jointly sponsored by the American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA), the Association of Independent Corrugated Converters (AICC), the Fibre Box Association (FBA) and the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI). Its mission is to foster growth and profitability of corrugated in applications where it can be demonstrated, based on credible and persuasive evidence, that corrugated should be the packaging material of choice; and to provide a coordinated industry focus that effectively acts on industry matters that cannot be accomplished by individual members. CPA members include corrugated manufacturers and converters throughout North America.

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Finelite wins RPA 2nd Annual Excellence in Reusable Packaging Award






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 9/26/2013 11:53:43 AM





Reusable Packaging Association’s second annual Excellence in Reusable Packaging AwardFinelite is the winner of the Reusable Packaging Association’s second annual Excellence in Reusable Packaging Award. The winner was announced and the award was presented at PACK EXPO in Las Vegas.

 

Finelite designs and manufactures high performance, environmentally sustainable lighting solutions and products for commercial, educational, and healthcare facilities. The company makes pervasive use of many types of reusables for storing and handling parts, and for shipping materials between its factory in Union City, CA and its strategic partners in Livermore, CA and China. The reusable solutions include tarps, straight-wall stackable plastic crates, plastic collapsible containers, and trays. In addition, racking systems are used throughout its warehouse. All of the company’s reusable products have been carefully designed to reduce waste and support lean manufacturing.

 

Finelite produces more than 25 product lines and the longest light fixture is 144 in. x 12 in. x 4 in. and weighs 18 pounds. 

 

By using reusables, Finelite has achieved the following results:

 

Annual cost savings:

• 53% ($9,100) cost savings by replacing shrink-wrap with reusable tarps
• 40% ($8,400) material cost savings and 130 hours of labor by replacing corrugated boxes with reusable/collapsible bulk containers and straight-wall crates.
• $10,800 cost savings in LED packaging material (bubble wrap and anti-static wrap) and 350 hours of labor saved by eliminating un-wrapping the packaging material.

 

Annual environmental savings:

• Eliminated 436 miles/6,000 pounds of plastic shrink-wrap
• Eliminated 14,700 pounds of corrugated cartons
• Eliminated 4,200 pounds of bubble wrap

 

Ongoing benefits:

• Both the containers and crates are stackable, allowing vertical storage of material and freeing up valuable real estate.
• The volume of each straight wall crate is used to its entirety and enables 20% more material to be packaged when compared to the previous corrugated box packaging.
• Crates are easily fed into the assembly lines for operators to consume. Operators can work with the material from their own crate supply.
• Capacity for materials in the collapsible containers is 10% more than corrugated boxes.
• Empty containers are collapsed, allowing for efficient storage.

 

“We use reusables because they deliver cost savings in materials and labor. In our experience, we break even on our initial investment of reusable systems within 2 years, and then the savings continue to accrue long after that,” said Ana Koo, industrial engineer, Finelite, Inc. “In contrast, disposable packaging materials have a short life span and represent an ongoing expense. We are honored to be recognized for our efforts, and we applaud the RPA for creating this award program to bring more attention to the value of reusables.”

 

Finelite’s first reusable initiative replaced pallets and shrink wrap with stackable racks throughout Finelite’s factory and at two strategic-partner facilities in Livermore, CA. The light fixture components are manufactured in Livermore, and packaged into the racks. The racks are then transported to the paint supplier (also in Livermore). After painting, the components are re-packaged into the same racks, and shipped to Finelite for final assembly. The racks are transferred into Finelite’s inventory system. As inventory is used up, racks become available and they are backhauled, empty, to Livermore, ready for the next cycle.

 

“Finelite is a great example of a company that recognizes the hard savings enabled by reusables, and continually looks for new applications within its manufacturing and assembly areas,” said Robert Engle, Chairman of the RPA Board and CEO of Otto Environmental Systems North America. “They also demonstrate the innovation of reusable suppliers. No matter what the size, complexity, or material of the product being handled, reusable suppliers can develop right-fit reusable systems that protect products, enable efficiencies in material handling, and deliver cost savings.”

 

Source: Reusable Packaging Association

 

 

 

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Summary version of recycling design guides unveiled






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/26/2013 4:08:50 PM





 

APR guideThe Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers, the leading trade organization representing the plastics recycling industry in North America, has published an executive summary version of their recyclability design guides for packaging and containers.

 

Steve Alexander, APR’s executive director, stated that while the organization has published its Design
Guides for the past 14 years, recently many non-technical audiences, consumer product companies, marketing and brand managers, as well as packaging design experts have expressed the need for a quick reference summary version of the guidelines.

 

“As one of its core missions, APR has always sought to provide packaging designers with specific information to allow for informed decisions,” says Alexander. For the past 14 years, the APR Recyclability Guidelines, which are based on actual industry experience, have provided that guidance to industry. These guidelines describe how a package design might impact conventional mechanical plastics recycling systems, be improved to avoid recycling problems, and be optimized to make plastic packages more compatible with current recycling systems.

 

P&G: Focus is on the most common items

 

Steve Sikra, Procter & Gamble’s global leader for packaging material science & technology, and a member of the APR board of directors, adds that “the APR Design for Recyclability Guidelines Executive Summary has been prepared by the APR as a quick reference tool for package designers, engineers, brand managers, and decision makers. It is focused on the most commonly reclaimed post-consumer packaging items: PET, polyethylene, and polypropylene bottles and containers. It contains key points to consider from the APR Design for Recyclability Guidelines.”

 

Alexander points out that the summary version of the guidelines will help to provide a broader audience with an understanding of how the technical aspects of container and packaging design will have an impact on the ability of the package or product to be recycled. “Recyclers tend to be the last to know about the impact of a new product or package design on the ability of the package to be recycled. Hopefully, this summary will help a broader audience consider the downstream implications of the recyclability of a package during the conceptual development stage.”

 

APR will present a web seminar Thursday, September 19th at 1:00 pm EST explaining how to utilize this valuable tool to aid in the design process when considering the recyclability of a bottle or container. Please visit https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/443533447537141504 to register for this informative webinar.

Please visit http://www.plasticsrecycling.org/technical-resources/apr-design-for-recyclabilityguidelines to download a copy of the Executive Summary as well as the full version of the Design guideline.

 

Source: The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR)

 

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Does cosmetic packaging need a makeover?






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/23/2013 10:15:00 AM





 

 

Sustainable Cosmetics Summit

 

Cosmetic companies are making slow progress in reducing their packaging footprints. Although the cosmetics industry has become preoccupied with green initiatives, few steps have been made to tackle the environmental impact of packaging.

Organic Monitor (www.organicmonitor.com) research finds most developments are occurring in ecodesign, with many brands reducing packaging materials by changing design structures. The Brazilian company Natura Brasil is a frontrunner in sustainable design. Its recent launch of its mass market SOU brand epitomises the packaging trend. SOU skin care products are housed in flexible packaging that have 70 percent less plastic than rigid plastic containers of the same volume.

As will be shown at upcoming editions of the Sustainable Cosmetics Summit (www.sustainablecosmeticssummit.com), most changes in packaging design are only leading to an incremental decrease in packaging materials. In some cases, any ecological benefits from less packaging material are offset by higher unit sales. More radical solutions involving materials are necessary to make significant changes to the packaging impact of cosmetic products.

Relatively few developments are occurring in packaging materials. Although some cosmetic brands are experimenting with sustainable materials like bamboo and wood, plastic packaging still prevails. High raw material costs and inadequate waste disposal methods give plastic packaging a very high environmental footprint. According to the OECD, packaging comprises over half of all household waste in developed countries, with plastics having most effect in landfill.

Plant-based plastics, once hailed because of their biodegradable nature, have yet to make headway in cosmetic applications. Some companies like Procter & Gamble are using hybrid polymers to overcome the limitations of bioplastics. Its Pantene Pro-V Nature Fusion packaging is mainly made from biopolymers sourced from sugar cane.

Unilever is one of the few companies considering a packaging overhaul to address its environmental footprint. The Anglo-Dutch multinational introduced a new ‘compressed’ can for a number of its deodorant brands earlier this year. The deodorant cans are about a third smaller, reducing packaging material costs as well as transportation costs. However, few companies have managed to innovate with green packaging.

 

There are also calls for the cosmetics industry to take some responsibility for waste management. In Brazil, the cosmetics association ABIHPEC is working with municipal agencies to collect and recycle packaging waste. In the US, Tom’s of Maine has partnered with Teracycle to collect its packaging waste and use it in new product applications. A closed loop system whereby waste is used as raw materials is considered the way forward for many cosmetic brands taking the green road.

Sustainable packaging is a focal theme of the upcoming Latin American and European editions of the Sustainable Cosmetics Summit. Discussion topics include environmental impact of packaging, ecodesign innovations, novel packaging materials, bioplastics in cosmetics, and green packaging success stories; papers will be given by Natura Brasil, Procter & Gamble, Unilever, Arkema, Selerant, Aptar, ABIHPEC and other organizations involved in sustainability.

 

Source: Organic Monitor

 

 

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Creative Thermoform Packaging Design Garners Barger, Placon’s Medical Division, a Prestigious IOPP AmeriStar Award in the Medical Device Category

Used in approximately 350 SKUs as part of the overall packaging configuration, Barger, a turnkey designer and manufacturer of medical device packaging systems, collaborated with Wright Medical to develop and manufacture a unique small rigid thermoformed clamshell that provides high product protection and equally strong end-user satisfaction.

With a beauty in the simplicity of its design, the 2.5” long x 1.5” wide clamshell has a consistent footprint for easy validation, and can be used in both sterile and non-sterile presentations. In fact, the forward-looking design was made suitable for EtO, Gamma, Gas Plasma, E-Beam and other sterilization techniques. The distinctive thermoform has no sharp edges that come into contact with primary packaging material, ensuring no punctures or pin-holes to the bags while in transit or during storage and handling.

States Scott Duehmig, director of sales – custom and medical divisions Placon/Barger, “This is a great example of how collaborating with our customers can lead to exceeding expectations with a design that is simplistic, not only filling today’s requirements but with added flexibility for future products.”

Each year the IOPP commemorates the most innovative package designs. AmeriStar winners will be recognized for their ground-breaking contributions to the packaging industry on June 19th during the EastPack conference and exposition held in Philadelphia, PA.

ABOUT BARGER
With over 250 combined years of medical device and component packaging design and thermoforming experience, Barger, a division of Placon, provides turnkey solutions for sterile and non-sterile packaging systems. Barger’s philosophy of a “high touch”, customer-focused approach coupled with innovative design solutions has made the company one of the top 3 medical thermoformers in the US. ISO 9001 certified, Barger operates multiple clean rooms at its Elkhart, IN and corporate Madison, WI facilities.

ABOUT PLACON
For over 45 years Placon has been a leading custom designer and manufacturer of thermoformed plastic packaging with an extensive line of stock packaging products as well as environmentally-friendly recycled sheet materials for the retail, food and medical markets. Continuously setting the bar in thermoform packaging and sustainable material solutions, Placon provides innovative, high quality and safe packaging products that harness the power of tomorrow’s technology and design to solve customers’ challenges today. According to Plastic News, Placon ranks among the top 20 thermoformers in North America. 

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Getting more out of recycled EPS






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Jeff Timm, Contributing Writer — Packaging Digest, 7/12/2013 12:44:04 PM





Densified EPS on pallet

Ban this, ban that…it seems plastics continue to take the brunt of recent activism to eliminate certain types of end-use applications from the planet. Bans seem to gain momentum when there is no viable existing solution that addresses what the advisories are attempting to eliminate. 

One could present a case that many of these bans would not occur if viable solutions existed. For example, the problem that initiated bans on plastic bottles would probably go away if recycle drop-off containers were present everywhere to more easily facilitate their recovery and collection, if the local recycle infrastructure would and could accept all plastic containers, if economically viable markets existed for recycled plastics and if consumers were not totally confused on the simple steps of how and what to recycle. 

Let’s take the real case of expanded polystyrene foam (EPS), commonly referred to as Styrofoam. EPS used in packaging is an engineered solution to solve many packaging transport, safety and protection problems. EPS is a lightweight material, about 95 to 98 percent air, with good insulation properties. It is used in all types of products from drink cups that keep beverages hot or cold to packaging material. Its lightweight properties save fuel during shipping, protect goods from breakage and are low cost.

While the technology for recycling EPS is available, the bulkiness and lightweight nature of this packaging material is a hindrance to the recovery/recycle process. What if this problem could be addressed? Another area that needs to be addressed is that many recyclers and municipalities do not pick up EPS or any plastic except those that have the number 1 (PET) or 2 (HDPE) in the symbol with the chasing arrows on the plastic article. What if this, too, could be eliminated as a deterrent to EPS recovery/recycle?

There is significant demand for recycled EPS materials both in the U.S. and offshore, especially China. However, only a low 71 million pounds of EPS were recycled in 2010. The February 2013 Moore Recycling Associates Inc. Plastic Recycling Collection National Reach Study: 2012 Update found that 31.1 percent of the U.S. population has access to recycling programs for EPS foam foodservice articles and 12.2 percent has access to recycling of EPS packaging shapes. Both of these numbers are low when compared to 94.2 percent for HDPE bottles/jugs and jars with caps and 94.0 percent for PET bottles/jugs and jars with caps. 

Because of this limited access to EPS recycling, some businesses have a difficult time finding recycled EPS materials for their own raw materials. Recycled EPS foam has three potential uses: (1) mostly post-industrial in-house scrap and waste recycle put back into the process to combine with virgin EPS foam and (2) post-consumer recycled EPS to combine with virgin EPS or (3) used for non-EPS applications as an addition in virgin polystyrene and HIPS resin applications. 

Independent research by Wilson Jene Consulting, Pittsburgh, PA, explored finding potential sources of recycled EPS materials for consumption in the U.S. for the third use cited above. The U.S. market for PS resin is significantly larger (roughly a factor of 10 times larger) than the EPS foam market. Surprisingly, sources of recycled EPS are limited. The research found that although many EPS molders collect and use recycled EPS in their processes, the number of recyclers selling these types of materials is somewhat limited and many purchasers of these materials are located overseas. Holly Wilson-Jene says, “Knowing there are many non-foam plastic processors around the country that could utilize recycled EPS as a feedstock, these findings indicate that the demand might in fact be there if more of this material was available.” This sounds like a chicken and egg analogy. Wilson-Jene cites several reasons this material is in such high demand:

Recycled EPS is lower cost compared to virgin PS and is generally a high-quality feedstock with good physical properties. 

Because raw material costs can often represent 50 to 70 percent of the total cost of the manufactured product, the availability of a lower cost feedstock can enable manufacturers to be competitive in specific applications and markets. 

For some competitive markets and applications, the availability of a lower cost feedstock can help keep manufacturing located in the U.S.

So what is preventing this demand from being used? One of the reasons goes back to the earlier mentioned-EPS foam is 95 to 98 percent air. One cannot economically transport bulky foam from location A to location B. Or can one?

 

The solution is a process called densification, which can make EPS foam 50 to 90 times denser. Whereas a full 53-ft trailer load of loosely stacked EPS foam usually weighs approximately 2,000 pounds, compacted EPS foam that has been processed through a densifier can be shipped as a regular 40,000 lb full truck load (T/L) shipment.

 

Densification equipment can pay for itself often under two years in two ways:
1. Significant savings from reduced trash collection costs and landfill tipping costs; and
2. Revenue generated from the sale of the densified material and its further conversion for injection molding or extrusion processes. 

The big question remains: How can this demand for recycled EPS be filled? Over the last 20 years or so, significant advances in densification equipment and the installation of many units across the U.S. has occurred. Some units even run on the more accessible 120 volt AC current vs 240 volt current. A list of suppliers can be found at www.packagingdigest.com/densifiers.

Small mobile densification units have been fabricated by enterprising recyclers, utilizing existing smaller EPS densification equipment which is then mounted on a truck and accompanied by a power generation unit. This grass roots approach will gain momentum as densification equipment manufacturers pursue this opportunity and overcome the equipment challenges and support grows for local recycling drives or other types of innovative recycling activity. 

Some municipalities have used grants to install equipment that then generates a revenue stream for that municipality. Densification equipment is needed close to the source “locally” because of the lightweight nature of EPS foam and the high cost of transporting lightweight bulky materials. The densification process can be performed by the company generating the demand or through third party recyclers. The EPS foam recycling infrastructure is the “egg” in the previous analogy and EPS foam demand is the “chicken.” Which comes first?

Brand owners and retailers with significant EPS packaging materials should reconsider the possibilities as they face challenges of developing more sustainable operations and zero waste programs. Gut feelings suggest that consumers would embrace the ability to recycle EPS foam if there were readily available recycle outlets. And with a typical payback of two years or less for equipment, recycling EPS often makes financial sense. 

One way brand owners and retailers can accomplish this is by working together where retail stores are clustered together in a concise geographical area such as a mall complex to recycle waste EPS packaging materials. This could be accomplished by a recycling alliance, which would identify a site location within the area for a densifier operation managed by a recycler or brand owner. A second opportunity is for municipal recycling centers to develop an EPS recycling program using funding through grants and identifying marketplace demand for the recycled materials.

There are possibilities galore if we used our (recycled) resources more efficiently. There is a wave of change occurring in the plastic recycling market place. For example, non-bottle clear rigid plastic containers, plastic films/bags and larger non-packaging plastic parts are being added to recycle streams daily. Maybe now is the time to creatively identify more opportunities where recycled EPS can be added to this changing marketplace.

 

Jeff Timm is a Plastic Packaging & Adhesive Business Development Consultant, specializing in bioplastics and understanding of the cradle-to-cradle value chain to achieve sustainability goals. He is a frequent contributor to plastic and packaging journals as well as the bi-monthly Packaging Blog for www.adhesives.org, the web portal for the Adhesive & Sealant Council (ASC). He can be reached at Timm Consulting jeff@timmconsulting.net, www.linkedin.com/in/jefftimm, www.twitter.com/bioplasticman.

 

Moore Recycling Associates Inc., 707-935-3390
www.moorerecycling.com

Wilson Jene Consulting LLC, 412-513-9142
www.wilsonjeneconsulting.com

 

 

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Tetra Pak commits to renewable LDPE for cartons in Brazil






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 2:50:21 PM





In a first for the carton packaging industry, Tetra Pak announced on June 26 that it plans to sign an agreement with Braskem, the largest thermoplastic resins producer in the Americas, for the supply of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) made from sugar cane to its packaging material factories in Brazil.

 

TetraPak LogoThis breakthrough initiative, which will be limited in scope to Brazil only for the duration of the trial, is scheduled to start during the first quarter of 2014. According to the plan, Tetra Pak will use bio-based LDPE as a component of its packages produced in Brazil. The planned move to bio-based LDPE means that 100 percent of Tetra Pak packages produced in Brazil, about 13 billion, will have up to 82 percent packaging material from renewable sources.

 

“The new agreement to be signed with Braskem demonstrates our commitment to bring environmental innovations to our customers and is a further step in our journey to develop fully renewable packages,” says Tetra Pak president and chief executive officer Dennis Jönsson.

 

Braskem will use ethanol derived from sugar cane to produce ethylene, which is then converted into LDPE. The LDPE made from renewable sugar cane has the same technical properties as LDPE made from fossil sources, and the environmental benefits of being from a renewable source. Braskem biopolymers are known under the trademark “I´m green”.

“The new bio-based I´m green LDPE is as inert, resistant and recyclable as the polyethylene made from fossil sources but, contributes to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during the sugar cane growth process,” says Braskem president Carlos Fadigas. “The expansion of the green products line reinforces our commitment to adding value through sustainable development for the value chain.”

 

Since 2008, the Brazilian paperboard chain of custody is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSCT), which means that all the paper used in the production of Tetra Pak packages comes from forests managed in accordance with responsible forestry management principles.

 

Tetra Pak was the first liquid food packaging supplier to use bio-based plastic in its packaging, launching Tetra Brik Aseptic packages with StreamCapT 1000 produced with bio-based high density polyethylene (HDPE) supplied by Braskem in 2011. Earlier this month the company announced global availability of a bio-based version of LightCapT 30, which uses HDPE made from sugar cane.

 

ABOUT BRASKEM
Braskem is the largest thermoplastic resins producer in the Americas. With 36 industrial plants spread in Brazil, the United States and Germany, the company produces over 16 million tons of thermoplastic resins and other petrochemical products annually. As the largest biopolymer producer in the world, Braskem has capacity to produce 200 thousand tons/year of polyethylene from sugar cane ethanol. Find more information at www.braskem.com.br

 

ABOUT THE FOREST STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL
The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an independent, non-governmental, not for profit organization established to promote the responsible management of the world’s forests. FSC is a unique forum where stakeholders from around the world meet and, through strong multi-stakeholder processes, define essential social and environmental criteria for forest management. These fundamental principles are realized in forests worldwide through FSC certification. Find more information at www.fsc.org

Source: Tetra Pak

 

 

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Museum builds Recycle Reef exhibit with protective packaging






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/15/2013 11:25:26 PM





 

Hexacomb Recycle Reef

 

 

An ocean reef made from a paper-based packaging structure? Not what one would typically expect. But that’s exactly what visitors will see this summer at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas, TX.

 

Hexacomb, a Boise company, has donated several hundred sheets of its honeycomb protective packaging material to the Perot Museum to build Recycle Reef, a temporary summer exhibit that opens to the public on Mon., June 17.

 

Hexacomb honeycomb is being used to fabricate an elaborate 4,000 sq ft reef ecosystem—complete with kelp beds, a shipwreck and deep sea sections. The exhibit’s foundation will be made entirely of honeycomb, including a shipwreck and kelp plants rising up from the sea floor.

 

Called Recycle Reef, the exhibit has been designed to promote recycling and also allow visitors to actually participate in creating the exhibit. A 2,000 sq ft section immediately outside the main exhibit, called the “making” area, will feature tables and bins also made from Hexacomb honeycomb. The area, stocked with child-safe tools and recyclable materials, will be the place where visitors can construct their personal masterpieces. Examples include fish, corals and other marine life, which they can choose to take home or add to the Recycle Reef. Every evening, a fresh layer of Hexacomb kraft paper will be placed on the tabletops so that the next day’s visitors will have clean work surfaces.

 

Hexacomb is made primarily from renewable wood fibers that have been engineered into a proprietary honeycomb configuration. The product offers excellent strength, superior cushioning and blocking/bracing, and is typically used to protect a range of durable goods in transit. These attributes also make it suitable material for a demanding structural project such as the Recycle Reef exhibit.

 

“I had seen Hexacomb being used in packaging applications before, so when we were evaluating options for building this exhibit, the material seemed like a perfect choice to support our recycling message. In addition to donating the material, Hexacomb has provided technical information and fabrication assistance. They have been a great partner throughout the project,” says Mike Spiewak, director of exhibits, Perot Museum.

Recycle Reef is intended to be dynamic as the exhibit evolves with each newly-contributed sculpture. In keeping with the theme, the entire exhibit will be recycled after it closes on Aug. 25.

“Hexacomb is pleased to partner with the Perot Museum on an exhibit that supports environmentally-positive messaging in such a creative way. Customers in North America and Europe typically select Hexacomb for both its performance and environmental attributes. We are thrilled that our material is now part of an educational and interactive consumer experience,” says Darlene Kober, director of global marketing and strategy, Hexacomb.

 

Source: Hexacomb, a Boise company

 

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East Afripack

Rwanda is a luxuriant country located in Central-East Africa with a population of about nine million and is characterized by one of the highest economic growth rates in the Sub-Saharan region: a yearly 7-8%. Last June 3-4 this alert country ready for high-quality development hosted in its capital Kigali the first international conference titled “Sustainable Packaging for Competitiveness and Development on SME’s in EAC Region”. 

Ipack-Ima SpA, a leading event organizer specializing in B2B shows for processing, packaging, material handling and converting, organized this important initiative with the support of the Italian Trade Promotion Agency (ICE) and the Italian Ministry of Economic Development (MISE) and in partnership with: East African Community, UNIDO and Kenya’s Ministry of Industrialization and Enterprise Development.

The event, presided by Prof. Claudio Peri, Professor Emeritus of the University of Milan, presented a speech agenda that raised the interest of a large, attentive public. Both the organizers and partners had a double objective:

- emphasize the importance of packaging as a strategic leverage for technological upgrade and increased competitiveness of local SMEs; in this connection, a dedicated paper will be presented at the CAMI conference, which this week (June 10-14, 2013) will gather the Ministers of Industrialization from across the continent in Nairobi;

- promote East Afripack 2014, the first exhibition showcasing the global state of the art of processing, packaging and converting technology scheduled for September 9-12 in Nairobi.

The issue of technology and competitiveness of the local entrepreneurial tissue is of great current interest in East Africa. On June 1st the newly elected President of Kenya, Uhuru Kenyatta declared: “With respect to value addition, we want to see more cooperatives venture not only into value addition, but also packaging, branding and marketing of highly quality products…”.

The Kigali conference is just one more step in the path leading up to East Afripack 2014, which also includes roadshows and presentations across the region to the end of uniting and building awareness among the local business community on the issues connected to processing and packaging technology and promote the 2014 event. 

In this connection, in order to better understand the innovation drivers and needs of the local industry, Ipack-Ima SpA has commissioned UNIDO to perform a market research involving the most significant industries (both food and non-food) across the entire East Africa region: Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda. The most significant evidence emerging from the study shows that:

- 63% of interviewees intend to plan technology investment in the next three years to expand their manufacturing activities;

- 78 % plan to update their processing and packaging machinery in the next three years;

- 70% believe that a better packaging technology improves their products’ image and branding.

In 2000 The Economist dedicated the cover to the African continent with a headline that read “The hopeless Continent”; after 11 years, The Economist changed the title to “Africa Rising”.

According to estimates by UNIDO, in the last decade six out of 10 emerging economies enjoying the highest growth rates have been located in Africa. In 2012 IMF estimated Africa’s economic growth at nearly 6%, the same as Asia’s. Emerging industries include: finance, distribution; agro-food; transport and telecommunications. Both data and forecasts bode very well for East Afripack 2014.

EAST AFRIPACK is powered by Ipack-Ima Spa in partnership with UNIDO, EAC, Ministry of Industrialization and Enterprise Development of the Government of Kenya 

UNIDO, The United Nations Industrial Development Organization, headquartered in Vienna, Austria, is the specialized agency of the United Nations charged with coordinating all activities of the United Nations system in the field of sustainable industrial development in the developing countries and in countries with economies in transition.  UNIDO promotes industrial development and cooperation on global, regional, and national as well as on sectoral levels, within the framework of its three thematic priorities of poverty reduction through productive activities, trade capacity-building, and environment and energy.

EAC, The East African Community, headquartered in Arusha, Tanzania, is an intergovernmental organization comprising the Republic of Burundi, the Republic of Kenya, the Republic of Rwanda, the United Republic of Tanzania, and the Republic of Uganda (Partner States) that is determined to strengthen economic, social, cultural, political, technological, and other ties for the accelerated, balanced, and sustainable development of its Partner States.

Ipack-Ima  Spa, is an Italian joint stock company headquartered in Milan, Italy, whose mission is to promote the development of processing and packaging technologies, organizing exhibitions and events for the related industries. Its biggest asset is the historical exhibition IPACK-IMA, which has become a reference for all field operators.

Ministry of Industrialization and Enterprise Development of the Government of Kenya Vision of the Ministry of Industrialization is to be a leader in catalyzing a diversified, globally competitive and sustainable industrial sector in Kenya. Its mission is to facilitate an expanding, innovative industrial sector globally competitive by creating an enabling environment.

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