Packaging environmental claims–still a challenge for many






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/23/2013 12:05:29 PM





A few months back, I read an article in Packaging Digest about consumers taking responsibility for “green actions.” After citing some statistics about how a “record-high 71 percent of Americans” are “buying with an eye toward green,” the article went on to talk about some of the challenges consumers have in following through on their intent. At least 33 percent indicated that inadequate resources, “such as recycle bins or community access,” were preventing them from following through. An even greater number-60 percent-indicated that they find the environmental terms companies use in their product advertising or package messaging misleading or confusing. 

That got me thinking about the on-package messaging audits we’ve done, particularly around recyclability. Here are common mistakes we’ve found, and why the messaging is misleading or just plain incorrect.

 

• A variety of brands of pump-dispensing hand soap bottles display the Möbius loop (or chasing arrows) on the bottle component of the packaging. These packages are typically a polyethylene (PET) bottle and a polypropylene (PP) closure with a pump assembly that includes metal parts. Use of the Möbius loop on the bottle provides only part of the information the consumer requires. Indeed, more than 60 percent of the population (the percentage required by the Federal Trade Commission’s Green Guides to make a recyclability claim) have access to recycle both PET bottles and non-bottle rigid plastic items. However, since the pump has metal parts that cause problems in plastic reprocessing, the PP closure with its pump assembly is not recyclable and should be labeled as such.

 

• Most grocery stores today sell pre-washed, pre-cut vegetables in plastic bags. Many of these bags display the resin identification code (RIC) No.4 with its chasing arrows. Using a RIC in this manner constitutes a “widely recycled” claim since a majority of consumers believe the RIC is a recycling symbol. While low-density PET No.4 bags are recyclable, the message is misleading. It suggests curbside collection, which is only available to about 20 percent of the population. LDPE bags need to be dropped off at retail stores for recycling, so the packaging needs to clarify that. An appropriate label would be the Möbius loop (not the RIC) prominently displayed with the words “store drop-off.”

 

• Chewing gum is regularly sold in multipacks consisting of a small paper carton containing the individually paper- and foil-wrapped sticks of gum and sealed with a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) overwrap. The most common labeling found on these packages is a No.3 RIC, indicating PVC and constituting a “widely recycled” claim. Virtually none of the U.S. population has access to PVC film recycling, so the labeling is incorrect.

 

Additionally, since the label is on the outer packaging component, most consumers infer that it applies to all of the packaging components, which is also misleading. To facilitate proper disposal of this type of packaging, all of the components should be labeled. The plastic overwrap and foil wrapper should have a Möbius loop with a red slash through it, indicating that they fall into the “not yet recycled” category. The paper wrapper (if separate from the foil wrapper) should carry the Möbius loop, as should the paper carton. Common mistakes like these are a primary reason GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition, with input from its member companies, created the How2Recycle Label. The label is designed to help brand owners provide clear and consistent recyclability guidance to consumers for each component of a product’s packaging. 

Author Katherine O’Dea is senior director of innovation and advisory services for GreenBlue. For more information about GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition, visit www.sustainablepackaging.org.

 

 

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PET bottle recycling soars in Europe






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/12/2013 10:51:18 AM





PET is the largest plastic material recycled in Europe, with the equivalent of more than 60 billion bottles recycled in 2012.

 

PETCORE EUROPE Chairman Roberto Bertaggia says: “Despite the poor economic situation in the European region, the consumption of PET bottles is still showing clear trends of penetration into new market segments through innovative packaging and the recognized capability of PET to be recycled. From a sustainability perspective, our industry is thrilled to have achieved an overall collection rate in 2012 of more than 52 percent of all post-consumer PET bottles available in the region.”

 

“With the exception of two members, all EU Member States managed to achieve PET recycling rates above the Packaging & Packaging Waste Directive target of 22.5 percent for plastics.” he added.

 

Casper van den Dungen, PET Chairman at Plastics Recyclers Europe, underlined that “The overall European collection of PET bottles to 1.68Mt reflecting an increase of 5.6 percent compared to the previous year. This has helped to ease the overcapacity situation of recyclers with an average plant utilization of 80 percent.”

 

“In 2012 the fibres market was still the single largest end-market for recycled PET, but strong growth in the sheet and bottle market are putting these three markets at similar levels.” said Casper van den Dungen.

 

Source: Petcore Europe 

 

 

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3D Package Kickstarts New Honey Badger BBQ Sauce

In 2012, three California engineers dissatisfied with the barbecue sauce choices on local store shelves created their own super-spicy honey-and-habanero version. They dubbed their invention Honey Badger BBQ Sauce – inspired by a popular YouTube parody of a National Geographic program on the African honey badger – and decided to bring the product to market in a 3D package shaped like its rough-and-tough animal namesake.

With nearly $50,000 raised on crowdfunding website Kickstarter and design/production assistance from Berlin Packaging’s Studio One Eleven, the unlikely food entrepreneurs went to work to translate their concept into reality. The process required multiple adjustments to the sauce company’s preliminary 3D sketches in collaboration with the mold maker, blow molder and filler to ensure manufacturability and fillability. The final blown PET bottle design features a snarling honey badger locked in combat with a cobra, complete with claws, fangs and ferocity that practically jump out of the resin. 

The 16 oz bottle was produced in two versions for two different sauce formulations: a $6.99 ‘Cobra Strength’ version with a pressure sensitive label and a stock black heat induction line cap, and a $60 palate-on-fire ‘Triple Cobra Strength’ limited edition with an embossed, numbered metal badge and the same closure in red. The limited edition sold out almost immediately to Kickstarter funders and on www.honeybadgersauce.com. The milder edition has also sold briskly online, earned placements in several San Francisco-area stores, and is now on its way to broader distribution. The package, says co-creator Paul Lees, is the “centerpiece of the whole brand.”

From Paper to Production
The road to building the brand began with a series of 3D sketches created by a designer in England with whom the three Honey Badger Products partners had worked previously. Those initial drawings established the distinctive structure of the package, from the badger-versus-cobra image to the sharp teeth and other fine details that bring the badger’s savage persona to life, but they presented multiple mold, production, filling and labeling challenges.

The length of the snout and the heavy detail on the badger’s face, for example, would have caused uneven plastic distribution during blow-molding as well as filling complications because the bottle opening would not be centered for the fill heads. The irregular shape lacked a neck or other spot that could be gripped by the filler’s scrambler machine to properly orient the molded bottles for filling. The protruding belly, back and nose yielded positioning difficulties on the conveyor, and the location of both the snake and the badger’s claws left insufficient label space.  

Working with Creative Blow Mold Tooling (Lee’s Summit, MO), Parker Plastics (Sand Springs, OK), and Arcobasso Foods (Hazelwood, MO), consultants at Berlin Packaging suggested modifications ranging from shrinking the size of the snout to reducing the circumference of the body to allow the bottle to hit the guide rails on the filling line at the appropriate points. Other recommendations included adding contact points on the badger’s shoulders and legs to aid alignment on the fill line, moving the snake and claws on the front of the bottle to create a label panel, and adjusting critical features like the fangs to ensure that there would be adequate definition when the bottle rolled off the production line. (“We didn’t want the bottle to look like a honey bear,” noted Berlin Packaging’s Cathy Murphy.)

The Honey Badger team took the changes back to their designer for the final 3D work, the finished product hit the company website in January 2013 with media coverage in outlets from the San Jose Mercury News to Huffington Post, and several months later the package won a 2013 NACD Packaging award. Lees and his partners are convinced that their sauce’s unique mix of heat and sweet will win consumers over once they taste it, but they know that the package is fundamental to driving the initial sale.

“Barbecue sauce is the most competitive condiment in the market. On the shelf, most of them look the same,” Lees says. “Our package is a huge market differentiator, and that’s why it was so important to get it right.”

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Amcor Develops Tea Leaf Sculpted PET Bottle For Crystal Geyser’s Tejava Premium Iced Tea

Crystal Geyser Water Co., Calistoga, Calif., has introduced its award-winning Tejava Premium Iced Tea in eye-catching, elegant 18oz polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles from Amcor Rigid Plastics, the world’s leading producer of PET packaging. A cross-functional team from Crystal Geyser and Amcor, consisting of package designers, industrial designers, and engineering experts, achieved a major technical feat by applying Amcor’s vast industry experience along with advanced software programs to develop the first-of-its-kind hand-sculpted PET hot fill bottle. This innovative package design integrates a life size tea leaf motif with three-dimensional qualities into the bottle’s shape.

The PET container extends the Tejava product offering beyond its 1L and 12oz glass packaging, allowing Crystal Geyser to penetrate the on-the-go consumer market while also expanding its national footprint. National retail distribution for the new bottles will begin in early June at more than 7,000 CVS Drug Stores.

Tejava Premium Iced Tea is the world’s only 100% all natural, microbrewed ready-to-drink (RTD) iced black tea made entirely from handpicked tea leaves from the island of Java. Crystal Geyser’s vision was to create a one-of-kind PET bottle, incorporating the tea leaf motif into the design so that the final package would be distinct. “Our goal with this bottle was to provide consumers with an award-winning premium iced tea in an elegantly shaped PET bottle that distinguishes Tejava from the competition,” said Shawn Fitzpatrick, director of marketing for Crystal Geyser. “The bottle stands out on the shelf and its upscale image makes consumers want to stop and pick it up.” Crystal Geyser believes the new proprietary PET bottle, conceptualized by Rio Miura, will set a new packaging standard in the RTD tea category.

The unique bottle design delivers a container with strong shelf appeal, according to Mike Enayah, Amcor’s director of industrial design. “Ultimately, the bottle’s highly attractive and eye-catching shelf appeal motivates consumers to want to hold the container,” said Enayah. “This ‘organic element’ design had never been done before but Amcor was able to deploy the right tools, great talent, and the entire team to make it happen.”

Crystal Geyser’s initial design idea was so unique that it required Amcor to go beyond its traditional CAD capabilities. Indeed, Amcor utilized seven software systems which were adapted from the gaming, animation, movie, and automotive industries to accomplish the project in an unconventional manner. Different elements of each software program were combined and then put in the hands of Amcor industrial designer Greg Hurley who developed an “artistic” rendition of the tea leaf sculpture. 

Amcor’s industrial design and engineering team worked together to refine the design and the key structural elements of the bottle. Through the collaboration between Amcor’s design, CAD, and FEA team, a set of geometry was developed, providing more than an engraving but a highly refined structural element inspired by nature, explained Ricardo Sandoval, Amcor senior industrial designer. Extensive detail went into the tea leaf design which provides an organic flow and a unique textural experience for the consumer. The concept of the bottle was to give the illusion of “holding a bundle of tea leaves.”

“The scope of the project was to develop a unique innovative design that would capture the soul of the brand,” said Christopher Howe, Amcor’s project engineer. “This container development required an exclusive set of skills and select talent to take the design from concept to store shelf and at every stage of the project there were new challenges that required a unique solution.”

While the focus was on maximizing the design, Amcor also ensured that the bottle met its performance requirements to create a highly functional, eye-catching bottle. Amcor’s Advanced Engineering team performed Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling to predict the container’s performance behavior and thus create a bottle that would be functional in the real world. Amcor employed its PowerFlex technology which features a patented panel-less design which takes hot fill (185 deg F) bottle options to a new level. Amcor’s structural design eliminates the panels, and unlike competitive containers, provides the freedom to create various designs along the walls.

Amcor uses design and manufacturing techniques to create a patented bottle that absorbs vacuum via a specially designed base. A unique diaphragm within the base draws upward as the liquid cools. It has the geometric characteristics to enable the inverted cone-shaped diaphragm to deflect upward as the vacuum is created.

Amcor used three software systems to adjust the design geometry, resulting in a highly functional structure that maintained its aesthetic qualities. In addition, to meet Crystal Geyser’s compressed time-to-market needs, Amcor made innovative use of rapid prototyping tooling to provide timely samples to the customer for test marketing, according to Terry Patcheak, Amcor’s senior technical manager.

 “The Tejava bottle highlights Amcor’s drive to push the boundaries of PET and typical package constraints by utilizing cutting edge technology with top talent to deliver commercially innovative packages to the market,” said Howe.

Crystal Geyser also realizes key sustainability benefits with single-serve PET bottles. They are lightweight, unbreakable, less wasteful, and recyclable. The plastic bottles also result in significantly reduced transportation costs and other supply chain efficiencies.

In addition, Crystal Geyser Water Co. uses PET bottles for its 18oz and 1.25L sparkling mineral water products.

About Crystal Geyser Water Company
An industry innovator, Crystal Geyser Water Company (CGWC) pioneered flavored sparkling mineral water, whose popularity continues to grow as more consumers seek natural alternatives to sugared or artificially sweetened soft drinks. In addition to sparkling mineral water and Tejava premium iced tea, CGWC produces Juice Squeeze, a refreshing line of lightly carbonated juice beverages that contain a full serving of fruit and are made with 70% real fruit juice and no added sugars or preservatives.

Crystal Geyser Water Company (CGWC), based in Calistoga, Calif., is a natural beverage company founded in Napa Valley. For more than 35 years, the company has been committed to creating premium quality, wholesome and delicious natural beverages. CGWC products can be found at grocery, natural foods, drug/mass merchant, club stores, and food service outlets throughout the western U.S. The company operates as a subsidiary of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.

About Amcor
Amcor Rigid Plastics is among the world’s largest manufacturers of plastic packaging for the beverage, food, spirits, personal and home care, and pharmaceuticals industries with 66 facilities in 12 countries. Amcor Limited is a global leader in responsible packaging solutions, employing more than 35,000 people worldwide, operating in 43 countries across 300 sites. Amcor supplies a broad range of plastic (rigid and flexible), fibre, metal, and glass packaging solutions to enhance the products consumers use in everyday life. Amcor also provides packaging-related services that help customers succeed through collaboration and innovation driven by art and science. Amcor is headquartered in Melbourne, Australia, and is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange.

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

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Plastic converter joins The Coca-Cola Co. and Danone in PEF bottle development






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/3/2013 12:12:17 PM





AvantiumAvantium, a renewable chemicals company, and ALPLA Werke Alwin Lehner GmbH, one of the world’s leading plastic converters, have announced their Joint Development Agreement for the development of PEF bottles. After The Coca-Cola Co. and Danone, ALPLA is the third company to collaborate with Avantium on PEF, a bioplastic based on Avantium’s proprietary YXY technology. The goal of these collaborations is to bring 100 percent biobased PEF bottles to the market by 2016. 

“Avantium is very excited to have ALPLA enter the Joint Development Platform for PEF bottles,” says Tom van Aken, CEO of Avantium. “With ALPLA’s extensive and proven know-how in PET conversion, bottle design and bottle manufacturing, ALPLA will be a major contributor to accelerate the commercial rollout and industrialization of PEF. Jointly we can make PEF available for packaging in innovative markets and traditional applications. Together we have taken up the challenge to develop the supply chain for PEF as sustainable biobased packaging material to the beer and alcoholic beverage markets. As one of the world’s most innovative converters, ALPLA will be a key enabler to develop PEF bottles meeting the technical requirements for the market.”

Günther Lehner, ALPLA CEO comments: “By signing this agreement, ALPLA once again demonstrates its leadership in innovation in this industry. In the 1980’s ALPLA was the first to introduce the two-step PET bottle which started the transition from PVC to PET. Today, we are able to take innovation a step further and introduce our customers in the food, home care and personal care area to the next generation of biobased polyester: PEF. Sustainability is a key driver for growth for ALPLA and its customers. We are therefore pleased to collaborate with Avantium to bring the first 100 percent biobased and recyclable PEF bottles to the market.”

YXY technology
Brand owners are leading the transition from fossil resources based packaging materials like PET (polyethylene terephthalate), to biobased materials. Biobased materials should be compliant with existing recycling solutions. The YXY technology platform is a cost competitive ground-breaking catalytic technology to convert plant based materials into chemical building blocks for bioplastics, like PEF (polyethylene furanoate). PEF is a novel generation of 100 percent biobased and recyclable polyester which has the potential to replace conventional fossil resources based durable materials like PET. PEF has properties superior to PET such as a significantly higher barrier to oxygen, carbon dioxide and water, extending product shelf life and reducing production costs. An independent life-cycle-analysis study by the Copernicus Institute at the University of Utrecht has demonstrated the carbon footprint of PEF is about 50 to 70 percent lower than today’s PET.

PEF bottles
ALPLA will develop PEF bottles for personal care/ home care applications (such as cosmetics and detergents) and for food applications (such as sauces, dressings, baby foods and edible oils). ALPLA and Avantium will furthermore work on the development of bottles for beer and other alcoholic beverages. Today Avantium is supplying its development partners with PEF made from material produced at its Geleen pilot plant. Avantium is currently planning a 50,000 ton commercial plant, which is projected to be operational in 2016 to enable the full commercial launch of the first PEF bottles to consumers.

 

Source: Avantium

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Goya Foods redesigns marinades line from glass to PET packaging






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/29/2013 4:52:12 PM





 

Goya PETOld packaging in glass at left and new PET packaging to the right.Goya Foods Inc., based in Secaucus, N.J., the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the U.S. and a leader in Latin American food and condiments industries, has undertaken a major redesign of its marinade product line, converting 12-oz (355-mL) and 24.5-oz (725-mL) products from glass to lightweight polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles from Amcor Rigid Plastics.

 

Amcor’s Latin America custom designed hot-fill containers, which also feature a newly designed shrink wrap label, boast a highly attractive, iconic shape. The vibrant design was developed to promote a clean look that is both modern and elegant. The hot-fill bottle delivers significant performance and cost advantages including portability, reduced breakage, and light weight, along with sustainability benefits such as recyclability, reduced transportation costs, and a significantly reduced carbon footprint.

 

With the new PET bottle design, Goya also offers consumers more marinade product by moving from a 705-mL glass container to the 725-mL PET bottle. Consumers are drawn to the attractive and lightweight features of the PET bottles which are easier to grip compared to traditional glass containers. The marinade containers also further extend Amcor’s growing penetration in the food industry.

 

The use of PET in the 24.5-oz container results in a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 61.4 percent compared to glass, representing savings equivalent to annual GHG emissions from 313 passenger vehicles, according to Amcor.

 

In addition, the PET bottles permit 52 percent more product to be shipped per truckload.

“In the end, lightweight PET not only delivered a major savings in terms of freight cost but also gave us the glass-like appearance and the shelf appeal to maintain our brand image,” explains Joseph Perez, senior vice president of Goya Foods.

 

Meanwhile, both PET bottles are the first to feature Amcor’s new Origami hot-fill technology which incorporates six flat panels to counteract vacuum that occurs in hot-filled containers. The vacuum panels are designed to collapse to compensate for shrinkage during cooling to maintain structural strength and integrity. The flat surfaces create a modern, elegant profile which enhances gripping and consumer handling. A predominant neck adds to the bottles’ uniqueness and improves pourability.

 

Both the 12-oz and 24.5-oz PET bottles are custom designed for both ambient fill (up to 140°F) and hot fill (up to 185°F) applications. They have a 38mm finish and are seamlessly integrated into existing glass filling lines with minimal adjustment, according to Perez. The marinade products, available in three varieties including Chipotle, Mojo, and Naranja Agria, are sold in supermarkets and club stores in the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic.

 

Goya Foods also plans to replace glass with PET in an existing 12-oz juice beverage line. The conversion to hot-fill PET is expected by the summer, according to Perez.

Amcor offers 16- and 32-oz hot fill family size decanters and 12-oz, 38-mm ring neck style and 24-oz 63mm wide-mouth hot fill stock bottles for the food market. The company continues to focus on the development of new product offerings to meet the hot fill needs of food manufacturers.

 

For further information, please contact Mercedes Candedo, diversified products manager for ARP South & Central America, phone 954-499-4819, email Mercedes.Candedo@amcor.com

 

Source: Amcor Rigid Plastics

 

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Lightweight 64-oz PET bottle






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/12/2013 10:02:34 AM





 

Amcor 64 ozThe industry’s lightest 64-oz hot-fill polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle establishes a new standard for the size category. The unique stock container for juices and teas from Amcor Rigid Plastics delivers major sustainability advantages by utilizing novel design, tooling, and process technologies to slash 9 grams, or 13.2 percent, from the typical 68-gram PET bottle.

 

Amcor’s Innovation Group, consisting of a cross-functional design team of 20-year packaging veterans, developed patent-pending Powerblock 3.0 technology to provide a lightweight and strong stock hot-fill PET bottle with superior filling and stacking performance. The container also boasts a 38-mm lightweight finish that saves considerable material compared to the standard 43-mm finish for 64-oz PET bottles.

 

“The PowerBlock 3.0 container is a major breakthrough because we achieved a highly sustainable packaging solution without compromising performance,” says Michael Lane, Amcor principal engineer. “Our unique lightweight design retained line/stack handling performance and maintained ergonomic features for consumer handling.”

 

Multiple utility and design patents are pending for this novel PowerBlock 3.0 container. One patent covers an optimized conical base pushup with special diameter and height ratios and relationships. Another patent covers a round or rectangular base with strap-like features that are added to create a footed-style base. The segmented standing surface consists of four standing one-inch columns, which are lightweight, strong, and rigid.

 

Together, these technologies work synergistically to unlock material normally trapped in the base area. This allows for better material distribution in the container body, resulting in a lighter weight container without sacrificing performance. Angles, ratios, and other bottle geometry are optimized to obtain a balanced response to vacuum, pressure, and top load forces.

 

Powerblock 3.0 provides numerous benefits including multiple fill contact points and flat sides for added stability; optimized footprint (width and depth) for improved pallet pattern and corrugate savings; sustainability benefits including a reduced carbon footprint and transportation costs; and secure consumer handling with three intuitive areas for single-hand pouring.

 

Amcor applied its vast industry experience and advanced simulation programs to develop the lightweight base technology. A number of virtual modeling techniques were utilized to effectively predict key performance parameters like quantified hot-fill characteristics and warehouse stack performance.

 

While Powerblock 3.0 is initially targeted for 64-oz hot fill containers, Amcor expects to adapt the technology to other hot-fill bottles. Amcor has completed all development and the stock bottle is already commercial in several locations across the U.S.

 

Amcor Rigid Plastics

 

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Pet Beverage Bottles Are One Of The Trends For Future Development

Pet Beverage Bottles Are One Of The Trends For Future Development

PET beverage packaging as the packaging aspect of food production enterprises, more than 30 years people have been exploring ways to replace Glass bottle And tin cans in the packaging materials and containers, and plastic is the best material currently available. It has the characteristics of light weight, can reduce transportation costs. But not every plastic are suitable for Food Packaging . Polyester (PET) food packaging material appears to be a rapid development. The first use of PET bottles soft drinks business in the United States Coca-Cola Company, they used to replace 1.5-liter PET bottles 1 liter glass bottles, resulting in increased sales by 27%. PET containers after the food and beverage packaging gradually become a popular “hot demand.” PET containers light weight and strong firm attracted customers by the market. There is also a big advantage of PET material that can form any shape (the applicability of good), but also can be processed into line with people’s habit of color, text and images can be Print .

PET beverage bottles are one of the trends for future development

Domestic PET bottle of mainstream products, initially limited to colas, mineral water, distilled water used in drinks like packaging container, the application of its excellent performance and reasonable price widely welcomed by users in these drinks packaging Based on the successful application of recent years has been in the heat-resistant PET bottle bottled drinks black tea, green tea, Juice And edible oil, cosmetics, medicine, pesticide and other industries to expand its applications. It is reported that in 1996 China’s production of PET bottle 3 billion in 1998 rose to 5 billion in 2000 to reach 8 billion, 9 billion in 2001, 2002, to reach 10 billion, 13 billion in 2004 to become Plastic packaging materials Largest increase variety. Particularly since 2001 with the sudden emergence of the domestic market of tea drink (tea production in 2001 reached 3,000,000 t), tea beverages 85 ~ 90 hot filling PET bottle PET bottle has become the fastest growing in recent years species. At the same time, PET aseptic cold filling bottle the trend of the rise in Japan and other countries, cause for concern. Aseptic cold filling PET bottle technology will reduce the number of applications the importance of hot-fill PET bottles, PET bottles to increase non-heat-resistant PET bottle production in the whole of GDP. Mentioned earlier non- Carbonated beverages Fruit juice, vegetable juice, various flavors of tea drinks, dairy products, coffee, etc., the traditional hot filling perfusion techniques are used, but this technology PET bottles require a higher (must use high-temperature hot-fill PET bottles ), it was reported that Japan already has one-third of non-carbonated beverages using aseptic cold filling technology, therefore, that the future development of PET beverage bottles are one of the trends. A report said the new nutrient-based drinks and flavors added products can help revitalize the stagnant special drink bottled water market, and PET resin and PET bottle suppliers to bring new opportunities.

Recession in the global economy environment, the 2009 pairs of plastic food and beverage packaging industry in China will no doubt be a cold winter, but the ability of PET bottle industry is expected to warm more than other plastic packaging industry stronger. This is mainly the Chinese beverage market in recent years, especially fruit juice and tea drinks market growing rapidly. As the most mainstream of the current beverage packaging materials will also benefit from this PET bottle, so, PET bottles will have greater market opportunities.

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Labthink Introduces New Beer PET Bottle Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Permeation Testing Instrument

Labthink Introduces New Beer PET Bottle Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Permeation Testing Instrument

Labthink?www.labthink.cn?has newly developed beer PET bottle carbon Dioxide CO2 permeation testing instrument, PERME G2/130 Differential Pressure Package Gas Permeation Testing Instruments,  to test carbon dioxide permeation rate for beverage industry. This testing instrument can rapidly test the carbon dioxide permeation rate so as to bring forward evidences for beer shelf life confirmation.

Besides, this Labthink PERME G2/130 Differential Pressure Package Gas Permeation Testing Instruments can be widely applied in gas permeation testing of plastic, metal, glass and other finished packages. The test gases include air, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The finished packages include various bottles, punches, boxes, cans and barrels, as beverage bottles, tin cans, milk bag & box, oil containers and other metal/non-metal packages.

 

Specifications:

Testing Range: 0.0001?100ml/pkg·day

Specimen Range: 1, 2 or 3

Humidity: closed mode: 100%RH?0%RH?2%RH?98.5%RH

         Open mode: ambient temperature

Testing Gases: Oxygen, Nitrogen or carbon dioxide

Air Source Pressure: 0.4MPa?0.6 MPa

Specimen Size: Closed mode: max. out diameter is less than ?114mm, height is less than 360 mm; min. inner diameter of bottle mouth is 8mm; max. out diameter is less than 50mm (also customization)

Open mode: max. size is no less than?195mm

Dimensions: 670 mm?L?× 490 mm?B?× 653 mm?H?

 

PERME is one of the product brands of Labthink Instruments CO., Ltd.

 

Labthink Instruments Co., Ltd.

No. 144 Wuyingshan Road, Jinan 250031, China

Tracy Bao  info@labthink.cn

Tel: 0086 531 85061153  fax:0086 531 85812140

 

Labthink, the excellent provider of testing instruments and testing services, is devoted to provide most excellent and complete quality control solutions for pharmaceutical, foodstuff, cosmetics, packaging, printing, adhesive, automotive, petrochemistry, environment, biology, new energy, construction, aviation and electronic industries worldwide.

Labthink is devoted to share excellent quality testing and control techniques with global clients and is known for wide coverage of international testing standards. Labthink participates in the drafting of several important standards of food, pharmaceutical and packaging industries, and is the excellent partner of national certification institutes.

Labthink has also established cooperation with IGT, Rycobel, Metrotec, Chilton, Moroka and other renowned distributors to provide attentive and prompt technical services for her customers in more than 40 countries and regions.

Labthink aims at creating satisfactory value and professional services for her customers.

Labthink, think for you only!

Labthink, the excellent provider of testing instruments and testing services, is devoted to provide most excellent and complete quality control solutions for pharmaceutical, foodstuff, cosmetics, packaging, printing, adhesive, automotive, petrochemistry, environment, biology, new energy, construction, aviation and electronic industries worldwide.

Article from articlesbase.com

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Labthink Introduces New Soda PET Bottle Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Permeation Tester

Labthink Introduces New Soda PET Bottle Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Permeation Tester

  Labthink has newly developed soda PET bottle carbon dioxide (CO2) permeation tester, PERME G2/130 Differential Pressure Package Gas Permeation Tester, to test carbon dioxide permeation rate for beverage industry. This tester can test the carbon dioxide permeation rate rapidly so as to bring forward evidences for soda shelf life confirmation.

  Besides, this Labthink PERME G2/130 Differential Pressure Package Gas Permeation Tester can be widely applied in gas permeation testing of plastic, metal, glass and other finished packages. The test gases include air, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The finished packages include various bottles, punches, boxes, cans and barrels, such as beverage bottles, tin cans, milk bag & box, oil containers and other metal/non-metal packages.

Specifications:

Testing Range: 0.0001?100ml/pkg·day

Specimen Range: 1, 2 or 3

Humidity: closed mode: 100%RH, 0%RH, 2%RH?98.5%RH

         Open mode: ambient temperature

Testing Gases: Oxygen, Nitrogen or carbon dioxide

Air Source Pressure: 0.4MPa?0.6 MPa

Specimen Size: Closed mode: max. out diameter is less than ?114mm, height is less than 360 mm; min. inner diameter of bottle mouth is 8mm; max. out diameter is less than 50mm (also customization)

Open mode: max. size is no less than?195mm

Dimensions: 670 mm(L)× 490 mm(B)× 653 mm(H)

 

PERME is one of the product brands of Labthink Instruments CO., Ltd.

  Further information please feel free to contact Shirley Wu via trade2@labthink.cn, skype:shirley-labthink, MSN:shirleywu_labthink@hotmail.com or (tel)0086-531-85068709.

About Labthink:

Labthink, the excellent provider of testing instruments and testing services, is devoted to provide most excellent and complete quality control solutions for pharmaceutical, foodstuff, cosmetics, packaging, printing, adhesive, automotive, petrochemistry, environment, biology, new energy, construction, aviation and electronic industries worldwide.

Article from articlesbase.com

Related Blogs

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