Sealed Air Shrinks PET Recycling Concerns with New Cryovac LT-1 Shrink Sleeve Label

Sealed Air has expanded its presence in the shrink label market with the unveiling of its new Cryovac LT-1 shrink sleeve label, among the first in the industry with a density lower than the 1g/cc standard which guides polyethylene terephthalate (PET) recycling. The labels are composed of a multi-layer polymer-based film to provide 360-degree, form-fitting bottle coverage while enhancing sustainability and performance.

Featuring a density of 0.95 g/cc, Cryovac LT-1 shrink sleeve labels easily separate and float from source PET bottles once they reach the recycling process. This reduces contamination during recycling and enables greater bottle recycling efficiencies. A video demonstrating these properties can be viewed here.

“Shrink label separation has emerged as one of the greatest challenges for PET recyclers, who battle accumulating waste as a result of high-density labels that sink and ultimately mix with PET bottle flakes,” said Scott Keefauver, marketing manager, Sealed Air Packaging Solutions. “By offering a high-performance, PVC-free label that complies with sorting equipment and grants second life for recycled bottles, Sealed Air reinforces our commitment to our SmartLife sustainability approach, which emphasizes reducing waste while increasing value of recycled material.”

Cryovac LT-1 shrink labels additionally deploy low temperature, high shrink (up to 70% at 90 degrees Celsius), enabling tight, secure fit to any bottle design. Each label is composed of pliable, high-gloss material that prevents cracking and reduces potential damage from scratching, while maximizing product retail shelf presentation. In addition, the Cryovac LT-1 label yields up to a 30% source reduction compared to other monolayer shrink sleeve labels.

Fully compatible with existing label systems, converters can implement Cryovac LT-1 labels without additional equipment or hassle. The product’s exterior film layer consists of a print-friendly substrate that is likewise compatible with existing shrink sleeve inks and seaming solvents.

“Cryovac LT-1 shrink sleeve labels deliver unparalleled performance and sustainability for converters without requiring additional printing, converting or process expenses,” said Keefauver. “By providing our customers with final products that are both functional and appealing, Sealed Air drives value across multiple sectors, including beverages and health and beauty, among others.”

For more information about Cryovac LT-1 shrink sleeve labels, visit www.shrinkfilms.com.

About Sealed Air
Sealed Air is a global leader in food safety and security, facility hygiene and product protection. With widely recognized and inventive brands such as Bubble Wrap brand cushioning, Cryovac brand food packaging solutions and Diversey brand cleaning and hygiene solutions, Sealed Air offers efficient and sustainable solutions that create business value for customers, enhance the quality of life for consumers and provide a cleaner and healthier environment for future generations. Sealed Air generated revenue of approximately $7.6 billion in 2012, and has approximately 25,000 employees who serve customers in 175 countries.

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Packaging environmental claims–still a challenge for many






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/23/2013 12:05:29 PM





A few months back, I read an article in Packaging Digest about consumers taking responsibility for “green actions.” After citing some statistics about how a “record-high 71 percent of Americans” are “buying with an eye toward green,” the article went on to talk about some of the challenges consumers have in following through on their intent. At least 33 percent indicated that inadequate resources, “such as recycle bins or community access,” were preventing them from following through. An even greater number-60 percent-indicated that they find the environmental terms companies use in their product advertising or package messaging misleading or confusing. 

That got me thinking about the on-package messaging audits we’ve done, particularly around recyclability. Here are common mistakes we’ve found, and why the messaging is misleading or just plain incorrect.

 

• A variety of brands of pump-dispensing hand soap bottles display the Möbius loop (or chasing arrows) on the bottle component of the packaging. These packages are typically a polyethylene (PET) bottle and a polypropylene (PP) closure with a pump assembly that includes metal parts. Use of the Möbius loop on the bottle provides only part of the information the consumer requires. Indeed, more than 60 percent of the population (the percentage required by the Federal Trade Commission’s Green Guides to make a recyclability claim) have access to recycle both PET bottles and non-bottle rigid plastic items. However, since the pump has metal parts that cause problems in plastic reprocessing, the PP closure with its pump assembly is not recyclable and should be labeled as such.

 

• Most grocery stores today sell pre-washed, pre-cut vegetables in plastic bags. Many of these bags display the resin identification code (RIC) No.4 with its chasing arrows. Using a RIC in this manner constitutes a “widely recycled” claim since a majority of consumers believe the RIC is a recycling symbol. While low-density PET No.4 bags are recyclable, the message is misleading. It suggests curbside collection, which is only available to about 20 percent of the population. LDPE bags need to be dropped off at retail stores for recycling, so the packaging needs to clarify that. An appropriate label would be the Möbius loop (not the RIC) prominently displayed with the words “store drop-off.”

 

• Chewing gum is regularly sold in multipacks consisting of a small paper carton containing the individually paper- and foil-wrapped sticks of gum and sealed with a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) overwrap. The most common labeling found on these packages is a No.3 RIC, indicating PVC and constituting a “widely recycled” claim. Virtually none of the U.S. population has access to PVC film recycling, so the labeling is incorrect.

 

Additionally, since the label is on the outer packaging component, most consumers infer that it applies to all of the packaging components, which is also misleading. To facilitate proper disposal of this type of packaging, all of the components should be labeled. The plastic overwrap and foil wrapper should have a Möbius loop with a red slash through it, indicating that they fall into the “not yet recycled” category. The paper wrapper (if separate from the foil wrapper) should carry the Möbius loop, as should the paper carton. Common mistakes like these are a primary reason GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition, with input from its member companies, created the How2Recycle Label. The label is designed to help brand owners provide clear and consistent recyclability guidance to consumers for each component of a product’s packaging. 

Author Katherine O’Dea is senior director of innovation and advisory services for GreenBlue. For more information about GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition, visit www.sustainablepackaging.org.

 

 

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PET bottle recycling soars in Europe






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posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 8/12/2013 10:51:18 AM





PET is the largest plastic material recycled in Europe, with the equivalent of more than 60 billion bottles recycled in 2012.

 

PETCORE EUROPE Chairman Roberto Bertaggia says: “Despite the poor economic situation in the European region, the consumption of PET bottles is still showing clear trends of penetration into new market segments through innovative packaging and the recognized capability of PET to be recycled. From a sustainability perspective, our industry is thrilled to have achieved an overall collection rate in 2012 of more than 52 percent of all post-consumer PET bottles available in the region.”

 

“With the exception of two members, all EU Member States managed to achieve PET recycling rates above the Packaging & Packaging Waste Directive target of 22.5 percent for plastics.” he added.

 

Casper van den Dungen, PET Chairman at Plastics Recyclers Europe, underlined that “The overall European collection of PET bottles to 1.68Mt reflecting an increase of 5.6 percent compared to the previous year. This has helped to ease the overcapacity situation of recyclers with an average plant utilization of 80 percent.”

 

“In 2012 the fibres market was still the single largest end-market for recycled PET, but strong growth in the sheet and bottle market are putting these three markets at similar levels.” said Casper van den Dungen.

 

Source: Petcore Europe 

 

 

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Amcor Develops Tea Leaf Sculpted PET Bottle For Crystal Geyser’s Tejava Premium Iced Tea

Crystal Geyser Water Co., Calistoga, Calif., has introduced its award-winning Tejava Premium Iced Tea in eye-catching, elegant 18oz polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles from Amcor Rigid Plastics, the world’s leading producer of PET packaging. A cross-functional team from Crystal Geyser and Amcor, consisting of package designers, industrial designers, and engineering experts, achieved a major technical feat by applying Amcor’s vast industry experience along with advanced software programs to develop the first-of-its-kind hand-sculpted PET hot fill bottle. This innovative package design integrates a life size tea leaf motif with three-dimensional qualities into the bottle’s shape.

The PET container extends the Tejava product offering beyond its 1L and 12oz glass packaging, allowing Crystal Geyser to penetrate the on-the-go consumer market while also expanding its national footprint. National retail distribution for the new bottles will begin in early June at more than 7,000 CVS Drug Stores.

Tejava Premium Iced Tea is the world’s only 100% all natural, microbrewed ready-to-drink (RTD) iced black tea made entirely from handpicked tea leaves from the island of Java. Crystal Geyser’s vision was to create a one-of-kind PET bottle, incorporating the tea leaf motif into the design so that the final package would be distinct. “Our goal with this bottle was to provide consumers with an award-winning premium iced tea in an elegantly shaped PET bottle that distinguishes Tejava from the competition,” said Shawn Fitzpatrick, director of marketing for Crystal Geyser. “The bottle stands out on the shelf and its upscale image makes consumers want to stop and pick it up.” Crystal Geyser believes the new proprietary PET bottle, conceptualized by Rio Miura, will set a new packaging standard in the RTD tea category.

The unique bottle design delivers a container with strong shelf appeal, according to Mike Enayah, Amcor’s director of industrial design. “Ultimately, the bottle’s highly attractive and eye-catching shelf appeal motivates consumers to want to hold the container,” said Enayah. “This ‘organic element’ design had never been done before but Amcor was able to deploy the right tools, great talent, and the entire team to make it happen.”

Crystal Geyser’s initial design idea was so unique that it required Amcor to go beyond its traditional CAD capabilities. Indeed, Amcor utilized seven software systems which were adapted from the gaming, animation, movie, and automotive industries to accomplish the project in an unconventional manner. Different elements of each software program were combined and then put in the hands of Amcor industrial designer Greg Hurley who developed an “artistic” rendition of the tea leaf sculpture. 

Amcor’s industrial design and engineering team worked together to refine the design and the key structural elements of the bottle. Through the collaboration between Amcor’s design, CAD, and FEA team, a set of geometry was developed, providing more than an engraving but a highly refined structural element inspired by nature, explained Ricardo Sandoval, Amcor senior industrial designer. Extensive detail went into the tea leaf design which provides an organic flow and a unique textural experience for the consumer. The concept of the bottle was to give the illusion of “holding a bundle of tea leaves.”

“The scope of the project was to develop a unique innovative design that would capture the soul of the brand,” said Christopher Howe, Amcor’s project engineer. “This container development required an exclusive set of skills and select talent to take the design from concept to store shelf and at every stage of the project there were new challenges that required a unique solution.”

While the focus was on maximizing the design, Amcor also ensured that the bottle met its performance requirements to create a highly functional, eye-catching bottle. Amcor’s Advanced Engineering team performed Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling to predict the container’s performance behavior and thus create a bottle that would be functional in the real world. Amcor employed its PowerFlex technology which features a patented panel-less design which takes hot fill (185 deg F) bottle options to a new level. Amcor’s structural design eliminates the panels, and unlike competitive containers, provides the freedom to create various designs along the walls.

Amcor uses design and manufacturing techniques to create a patented bottle that absorbs vacuum via a specially designed base. A unique diaphragm within the base draws upward as the liquid cools. It has the geometric characteristics to enable the inverted cone-shaped diaphragm to deflect upward as the vacuum is created.

Amcor used three software systems to adjust the design geometry, resulting in a highly functional structure that maintained its aesthetic qualities. In addition, to meet Crystal Geyser’s compressed time-to-market needs, Amcor made innovative use of rapid prototyping tooling to provide timely samples to the customer for test marketing, according to Terry Patcheak, Amcor’s senior technical manager.

 “The Tejava bottle highlights Amcor’s drive to push the boundaries of PET and typical package constraints by utilizing cutting edge technology with top talent to deliver commercially innovative packages to the market,” said Howe.

Crystal Geyser also realizes key sustainability benefits with single-serve PET bottles. They are lightweight, unbreakable, less wasteful, and recyclable. The plastic bottles also result in significantly reduced transportation costs and other supply chain efficiencies.

In addition, Crystal Geyser Water Co. uses PET bottles for its 18oz and 1.25L sparkling mineral water products.

About Crystal Geyser Water Company
An industry innovator, Crystal Geyser Water Company (CGWC) pioneered flavored sparkling mineral water, whose popularity continues to grow as more consumers seek natural alternatives to sugared or artificially sweetened soft drinks. In addition to sparkling mineral water and Tejava premium iced tea, CGWC produces Juice Squeeze, a refreshing line of lightly carbonated juice beverages that contain a full serving of fruit and are made with 70% real fruit juice and no added sugars or preservatives.

Crystal Geyser Water Company (CGWC), based in Calistoga, Calif., is a natural beverage company founded in Napa Valley. For more than 35 years, the company has been committed to creating premium quality, wholesome and delicious natural beverages. CGWC products can be found at grocery, natural foods, drug/mass merchant, club stores, and food service outlets throughout the western U.S. The company operates as a subsidiary of Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.

About Amcor
Amcor Rigid Plastics is among the world’s largest manufacturers of plastic packaging for the beverage, food, spirits, personal and home care, and pharmaceuticals industries with 66 facilities in 12 countries. Amcor Limited is a global leader in responsible packaging solutions, employing more than 35,000 people worldwide, operating in 43 countries across 300 sites. Amcor supplies a broad range of plastic (rigid and flexible), fibre, metal, and glass packaging solutions to enhance the products consumers use in everyday life. Amcor also provides packaging-related services that help customers succeed through collaboration and innovation driven by art and science. Amcor is headquartered in Melbourne, Australia, and is listed on the Australian Securities Exchange.

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Plastics Recycling: Profitable and Versatile Recycling Rates of 35% are Realistic

From the 1960s to the 1980s, the plastics industry gave little thought to sensible ways of disposing of or recovering waste plastics but the issue became relevant by 1991 when the German Packaging Ordinance came into effect. Taking the lead at the time, Germany was the first country to set up rules for the recovery of plastics waste and to establish them on the market. In the meantime, many countries in Europe have addressed the issue and developed highly successful strategies for collection and recovery. According to surveys by PlasticsEurope, about 47 million tons of plastics were consumed in the 27 countries of the EU plus Switzerland and Norway in 2011, 40% for non-durable and 60% for durable applications. In the same year, some 25 million tons of waste plastics were collected, 40% going to landfills and 60% being recovered.

The waste from collection systems for used packages accounted for over 60% of this, followed by products from the construction, automotive and electronics sectors. Exemplary collections systems are in place in nine European countries: Switzerland, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, the Netherlands and Luxemburg (listed in descending order) with collection rates ranging from 99% to 92%. At the same time, six of these countries have the highest recycling rates in Europe. Norway, Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and Austria with rates of 35% to 26% head the field by a clear margin. The remaining collected wastes are recovered to generate energy by incineration.

PET bottles are also amenable to single-grade sorted-waste collection and processing. The spectrum of products made from them range from fibers and films to new bottles. A large variety of suppliers like the Austrian companies Starlinger & Co. GmbH in Vienna, NGR GmbH in Feldkirchen and Erema GmbH in Ansfelden have developed special recycling lines for PET. Gneuss Kunststofftechnik GmbH in Bad Oeynhausen is successful in the marketplace with its MRS extruder, for which an FDA approval has even been obtained. In addition, machinery manufacturers are contributing various drying systems (like the infrared rotating drum from Kreyenborg Plant Technology GmbH in Senden), special filtrations systems for the processing of PET and also crystallization processes (like Crystall-Cut from Automatik Plastics Machinery in Grossostheim). Closed-circuit systems like PETcycle have become established for actually turning old bottles into new ones. In short, PET recycling, achieving a market volume of 1 million tons per year in Europe, does indeed work.

Problems facing recycling
Plastics items of different materials that cannot be sensibly separated constitute a further obstacle to recycling – as do products whose residues are difficult to remove entirely. Problems are also created by post-consumer film wastes, as they manifest a very poor ratio of surface area to contamination and therefore require laborious treatment. According to Michael Scriba, managing director of plastics processor mtm plastics in Niedergebra, there are indeed successful recovery specialists, but as of yet no established sales markets with a Europe-wide reach. Further challenges are posed by non-beverage bottles made of PET in a huge variety of types, which also have limited recoverability. The same applies to plastics from car and electronics residuals.

For such challenges, processors and machinery manufacturers are called upon to come up with appropriate solutions. For example, one solution for post-consumer film wastes from DSD collections has been recently supplied by Herbold Meckesheim GmbH in Meckesheim to the waste disposal company WRZ-Hörger GmbH & Co. KG in Sontheim. The turnkey plant, consisting of a separation device for removing extraneous substances, a wet shredding step and a Plastcompactor, converts 7,000 tons of wastes per year into free-flowing agglomerates with a high bulk density that can be used for the production of injection moldings. Especially for mixed fractions, Erema has teamed up with Coperion GmbH & Co. KG in Stuttgart to develop their Corema, a combined recycling and compounding line. Characteristic of this unit is its suitability for a wide range of materials. According to Erema managing director Manfred Hackl, this is an ideal machine for processing mixtures of materials obtainable at low cost and for converting PP nonwoven wastes into a compound with 20% talcum and for processing PET/PE mixtures with additives.

Another special solution is the MRS extrusion system supplied by Gneuss to K2 Polymers in the UK for the processing of polyamide 11 regrind. The feedstock comes from deep-sea oil pipes recovered from a depleted oilfield and brought ashore. After decades of service, these pipes are highly contaminated with oil. The Multi Rotation System (MRS) extruder manages to decontaminate and reprocess the high-grade plastics waste in a single step and without chemical washing.

Although many processes have already become established, recycling still has plenty of potential for improvement. A first step could be the recyclable design of plastics items that should be examined closely with a view to later recovery. Suitable recycling processes and machinery solutions for the processing of problematical wastes offer numerous possibilities for further development.

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Goya Foods redesigns marinades line from glass to PET packaging






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/29/2013 4:52:12 PM





 

Goya PETOld packaging in glass at left and new PET packaging to the right.Goya Foods Inc., based in Secaucus, N.J., the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the U.S. and a leader in Latin American food and condiments industries, has undertaken a major redesign of its marinade product line, converting 12-oz (355-mL) and 24.5-oz (725-mL) products from glass to lightweight polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles from Amcor Rigid Plastics.

 

Amcor’s Latin America custom designed hot-fill containers, which also feature a newly designed shrink wrap label, boast a highly attractive, iconic shape. The vibrant design was developed to promote a clean look that is both modern and elegant. The hot-fill bottle delivers significant performance and cost advantages including portability, reduced breakage, and light weight, along with sustainability benefits such as recyclability, reduced transportation costs, and a significantly reduced carbon footprint.

 

With the new PET bottle design, Goya also offers consumers more marinade product by moving from a 705-mL glass container to the 725-mL PET bottle. Consumers are drawn to the attractive and lightweight features of the PET bottles which are easier to grip compared to traditional glass containers. The marinade containers also further extend Amcor’s growing penetration in the food industry.

 

The use of PET in the 24.5-oz container results in a reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 61.4 percent compared to glass, representing savings equivalent to annual GHG emissions from 313 passenger vehicles, according to Amcor.

 

In addition, the PET bottles permit 52 percent more product to be shipped per truckload.

“In the end, lightweight PET not only delivered a major savings in terms of freight cost but also gave us the glass-like appearance and the shelf appeal to maintain our brand image,” explains Joseph Perez, senior vice president of Goya Foods.

 

Meanwhile, both PET bottles are the first to feature Amcor’s new Origami hot-fill technology which incorporates six flat panels to counteract vacuum that occurs in hot-filled containers. The vacuum panels are designed to collapse to compensate for shrinkage during cooling to maintain structural strength and integrity. The flat surfaces create a modern, elegant profile which enhances gripping and consumer handling. A predominant neck adds to the bottles’ uniqueness and improves pourability.

 

Both the 12-oz and 24.5-oz PET bottles are custom designed for both ambient fill (up to 140°F) and hot fill (up to 185°F) applications. They have a 38mm finish and are seamlessly integrated into existing glass filling lines with minimal adjustment, according to Perez. The marinade products, available in three varieties including Chipotle, Mojo, and Naranja Agria, are sold in supermarkets and club stores in the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic.

 

Goya Foods also plans to replace glass with PET in an existing 12-oz juice beverage line. The conversion to hot-fill PET is expected by the summer, according to Perez.

Amcor offers 16- and 32-oz hot fill family size decanters and 12-oz, 38-mm ring neck style and 24-oz 63mm wide-mouth hot fill stock bottles for the food market. The company continues to focus on the development of new product offerings to meet the hot fill needs of food manufacturers.

 

For further information, please contact Mercedes Candedo, diversified products manager for ARP South & Central America, phone 954-499-4819, email Mercedes.Candedo@amcor.com

 

Source: Amcor Rigid Plastics

 

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Lightweight 64-oz PET bottle






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/12/2013 10:02:34 AM





 

Amcor 64 ozThe industry’s lightest 64-oz hot-fill polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle establishes a new standard for the size category. The unique stock container for juices and teas from Amcor Rigid Plastics delivers major sustainability advantages by utilizing novel design, tooling, and process technologies to slash 9 grams, or 13.2 percent, from the typical 68-gram PET bottle.

 

Amcor’s Innovation Group, consisting of a cross-functional design team of 20-year packaging veterans, developed patent-pending Powerblock 3.0 technology to provide a lightweight and strong stock hot-fill PET bottle with superior filling and stacking performance. The container also boasts a 38-mm lightweight finish that saves considerable material compared to the standard 43-mm finish for 64-oz PET bottles.

 

“The PowerBlock 3.0 container is a major breakthrough because we achieved a highly sustainable packaging solution without compromising performance,” says Michael Lane, Amcor principal engineer. “Our unique lightweight design retained line/stack handling performance and maintained ergonomic features for consumer handling.”

 

Multiple utility and design patents are pending for this novel PowerBlock 3.0 container. One patent covers an optimized conical base pushup with special diameter and height ratios and relationships. Another patent covers a round or rectangular base with strap-like features that are added to create a footed-style base. The segmented standing surface consists of four standing one-inch columns, which are lightweight, strong, and rigid.

 

Together, these technologies work synergistically to unlock material normally trapped in the base area. This allows for better material distribution in the container body, resulting in a lighter weight container without sacrificing performance. Angles, ratios, and other bottle geometry are optimized to obtain a balanced response to vacuum, pressure, and top load forces.

 

Powerblock 3.0 provides numerous benefits including multiple fill contact points and flat sides for added stability; optimized footprint (width and depth) for improved pallet pattern and corrugate savings; sustainability benefits including a reduced carbon footprint and transportation costs; and secure consumer handling with three intuitive areas for single-hand pouring.

 

Amcor applied its vast industry experience and advanced simulation programs to develop the lightweight base technology. A number of virtual modeling techniques were utilized to effectively predict key performance parameters like quantified hot-fill characteristics and warehouse stack performance.

 

While Powerblock 3.0 is initially targeted for 64-oz hot fill containers, Amcor expects to adapt the technology to other hot-fill bottles. Amcor has completed all development and the stock bottle is already commercial in several locations across the U.S.

 

Amcor Rigid Plastics

 

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Plastic: is it the New Black Gold?

Plastic: is it the New Black Gold?

According to the report from the Ministry of environment, Mauritius produces some 120 tons of plastic wastes daily amounting to a total of 43,800 tons of waste every year of which only 4%, representing some 164 tons, are recycled. In 2006, the population’s consumption of non-biodegradable plastic products amounted to some 70 million Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottles, 7 million PVC bottles, and 113 million plastic bags.

Now just imagine a process able to clear our environment of plastic wastes, creating jobs in waste management and collection and at the same time bringing useful resources such as petrol and gas, which can be beneficial to our economy. The Liquid Hydrocarbons pilot project proposed by the Green Hydrocarbons (Mtius) Ltd has the ambitious desire of turning our plastic wastes into hydrocarbon petrol.

The environment friendly project, realized with the collaboration of the initiators of the project in India, Unique Waste Plastic Management & Research CO. Pvt. Ltd., will enable Mauritius to get rid of its plastic wastes while at the same time providing resources such as petrol. The initiator of the project will bring all the technology and equipment necessary for the setting of the pilot plant while the government, in collaboration with Green Hydrocarbons Ltd., will provide the necessary location and licenses.

The ratio of the conversion of the plastic waste into petrol is one kilogram of plastic into the volume of 1000 cc of petrol. The pilot project will hence be converting some 2.5 tons of plastic wastes daily into some 25,000 liters of petrol and other by-products. This project is a green alternative to the palliative solutions that have been found so far to deal with plastic wastes. Land filling, incineration, recycling, gasification and blast furnace have shown their limits in the treatment of plastic wastes.

Recycling is unfortunately not a practical solution in that the cost of collection is quite high; there is a limited market for it, with an absence of marketing. Moreover, plastic can only be recycled three to four times, after that it loses its strength and can’t be recycled. The project realized with the collaboration of Indian partners is due to start in the course of the year 2007, once the EIA obtained.

Beginnings

The concepts of plastic conversion into hydrocarbons was elaborated by Professor Alka Zadgaonkar of the Raisoni College of Engineering, Nagpur in Indian, in the year 1995. While giving a lecture on Applied Chemistry, she came up with the idea of turning plastic back into hydrocarbons. She worked with a team on the formula and in 2004; they succeeded in turning 300mg of plastic into hydrocarbon liquids.

Unique Waste Plastic Management & Research Co. Pvt. Ltd of India later launched a pilot project where some 5,000 tons of plastic wastes were converted everyday. The process was later extended to treat 25,000 tons daily in 2006 and the objective of the project is to treat some 450,000 tons. She asked for analysis by Indian Oil and made a number of recommendations for the use of the final products.

After about one year of operation, the project was realized with the help of loans. Representatives of the State Bank of India acknowledged that the project is already running on profit, thus proving the efficiency of the method. The world produces no less than 60% more plastic wastes than it did some ten years back with a production of 100 million tons every year. India produces 10,000 tons of plastic wastes everyday which 40% are recycled.

This project has enabled India to better manage the country’s plastic wastes while at the same time creating jobs. Actually India sells its hydrocarbon at 40% to 50% less than normal diesel. The technology is presently being exported to other regions such as Rajasthan and even to America; for instance, some hospitals are being operated using their own wastes.

The investments for the pilot project in Mauritius are estimated to around 100 to 300 millions Rupees. Land filling, incineration and recycling 4% are presently being used but they do not resolve the problem of environmental damage caused by plastic. The Waste to Compost project, will however give a new dimension to the processing of plastic in that hydrocarbon and the other by-products used as compost.

http://MauriTravel.com

About the author: André Lee is the Internet Marketing consultant, Advisors to Tour Operators and Ticketing Agents. More of his articles are available at http://mauritravel.com


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Pet Bottles : Safe Or Dangerous?

Pet Bottles : Safe Or Dangerous?

Polyethylene terephthalate or PET is a thermoplastic polymer resin that belongs to the polyester family and is mainly used in combination with glass fiber for the manufacture of synthetic fibers, liquid containers,thermoforming applications and engineering resins. It was in the 1970’s that PET bottles came to be rapidly manufactured using blow moulding techniques and thus it became an excellent material for beverage bottles. Some of the outstanding beneficial properties of PET include its lightweight, durability, strong material, extremely  good optical properties and sufficient gas barrier performance. PET bottles are made by employing a process called ‘injection stretch blow moulding’ which enhances  the properties of PET. Today, PET is used as a raw material for manufacturing bottles and containers for packaging a varied range of food products and consumer goods such as soft drinks, alcoholic beverages, cosmetics, pharmaceutical products etc.

PET bottles can be recycled so as to reuse the material with which they are manufactured and to lessen the amount of waste that goes to landfills. They are also recycled and reused for solar water disinfection in some of the developing nations.

However, environmentalists have raised serious concerns over the indiscriminate use of PET bottles. According to them, PET bottles have the potential to cause significant health hazards for users. Scientists and reserachers at the Goethe University in Frankfurt discovered that estrogenic compounds leach from the plastic in PET bottles into water. There is a strong probability thatcertain unidentified chemicals in these plastics have the extreme potential to interfere with estrogen and other reproductive hormones, causing disastrous health hazards.

Environmentalists and scientists recommend that PET bottles including single-use water, soda and juice bottles must not be reused. The Green Guide reports that such bottles could be safe only for one-time use and reuse should be strictly avoided. Studies reveal that they may leach DEHP(Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate)  another possible human carcinogen, into water which could create serious health risks. The Berkeley Ecology Center has come up with a recent discovery that the manufacture of PET bottles uses tremendous amounts of energy and resources and releases toxic pollutants into the atmosphere that ultimately contributes to global warming.

 

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Jackson Browne rants to blogger Beth Terry of Fake Plastic Fish about bottled water after the screening of the film Tapped organized by the Plastic Pollution Coalition. He says bottled water is “inconvenient” and compares albatross chicks that starve from eating plastic to our society in which we are starving for “real food and real information.” Jackson also talks about how he carries his own reusable water bottle through airport security and brings his own water cooler on tour to avoid plastic water bottles. For more information about plastic in the environment, visit: fakeplasticfish.com http For more information about bottled water, arrange for a screening of the movie, Tapped: tappedthemovie.com
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