McCormick sets new packaging weight reduction goals






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/16/2013 11:16:37 AM





McCormick logoMcCormick & Co. Inc., a global leader in flavor, has released its 2013 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) review, “Sharing Our Passion for Flavor.” The review builds on the company’s tradition of social responsibility by outlining key focus areas, examining current global initiatives, measuring performance and setting goals for the future. 

 

As highlighted in the review, the company exceeded its 2010 reduction targets for solid waste and electricity consumption a year ahead of schedule, resulting in a savings of enough plastic bottles to stretch the length of 14,000 football fields.

 

To continue to improve on its environmental performance, McCormick has now set new goals for further reductions by 2018, including:
• 25 percent reduction in bottle packaging weight using sustainable methods
• 50 percent reduction in solid waste

“Our CSR vision is to grow our business globally while driving positive change to the environment, within our communities and for our employees,” says Alan Wilson, chairman, president and CEO. “This CSR review highlights the linkage between our philanthropic work, protection of the environment and our business success.”

 

McCormick has already saved more than 300 tons of plastic annually by using sustainable packaging on four of the company’s plastic bottle types. The length of these saved bottles equals that of 14,000 football fields. These savings build upon the company’s success at its net-zero energy facility in Belcamp, MD, and its aggressive operational goals focused on energy efficiency, packaging, waste and water reduction at nearly 50 locations in 24 countries.

 

To help provide hunger relief for children and families in Madagascar’s vanilla growing region, the company has partnered with Help Madagascar. This nonprofit organization helps keep farmers’ children in school by rewarding class attendance with rice donations to their families. Supporting global communities like Madagascar through partnerships is critical to McCormick’s supply chain because it improves the day-to-day lives of suppliers and helps ensure a stable and reliable source of supply for high quality raw materials. To further these efforts, McCormick will commit to a 50 percent increase in funding to similar programs in farming communities in regions of the world where the company sources its products.

 

As a leader in global flavor, McCormick has committed to a 20 percent increase in funding to educate consumers globally on the role of flavor in healthy eating. By demonstrating how flavor can help inspire healthy choices, McCormick will show how to make it enjoyable and sustainable for people to eat more of the right foods and less of the foods to avoid (salt, sugar and fat). Additionally, McCormick will bring its “Eating Well” employee nutrition and wellness program to all global locations by 2018.

 

To read and download McCormick’s entire 2013 CSR Review, visit www.mccormickcorporation.com.

 

Source: McCormick & Co. Inc.

 

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Getting more out of recycled EPS






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Jeff Timm, Contributing Writer — Packaging Digest, 7/12/2013 12:44:04 PM





Densified EPS on pallet

Ban this, ban that…it seems plastics continue to take the brunt of recent activism to eliminate certain types of end-use applications from the planet. Bans seem to gain momentum when there is no viable existing solution that addresses what the advisories are attempting to eliminate. 

One could present a case that many of these bans would not occur if viable solutions existed. For example, the problem that initiated bans on plastic bottles would probably go away if recycle drop-off containers were present everywhere to more easily facilitate their recovery and collection, if the local recycle infrastructure would and could accept all plastic containers, if economically viable markets existed for recycled plastics and if consumers were not totally confused on the simple steps of how and what to recycle. 

Let’s take the real case of expanded polystyrene foam (EPS), commonly referred to as Styrofoam. EPS used in packaging is an engineered solution to solve many packaging transport, safety and protection problems. EPS is a lightweight material, about 95 to 98 percent air, with good insulation properties. It is used in all types of products from drink cups that keep beverages hot or cold to packaging material. Its lightweight properties save fuel during shipping, protect goods from breakage and are low cost.

While the technology for recycling EPS is available, the bulkiness and lightweight nature of this packaging material is a hindrance to the recovery/recycle process. What if this problem could be addressed? Another area that needs to be addressed is that many recyclers and municipalities do not pick up EPS or any plastic except those that have the number 1 (PET) or 2 (HDPE) in the symbol with the chasing arrows on the plastic article. What if this, too, could be eliminated as a deterrent to EPS recovery/recycle?

There is significant demand for recycled EPS materials both in the U.S. and offshore, especially China. However, only a low 71 million pounds of EPS were recycled in 2010. The February 2013 Moore Recycling Associates Inc. Plastic Recycling Collection National Reach Study: 2012 Update found that 31.1 percent of the U.S. population has access to recycling programs for EPS foam foodservice articles and 12.2 percent has access to recycling of EPS packaging shapes. Both of these numbers are low when compared to 94.2 percent for HDPE bottles/jugs and jars with caps and 94.0 percent for PET bottles/jugs and jars with caps. 

Because of this limited access to EPS recycling, some businesses have a difficult time finding recycled EPS materials for their own raw materials. Recycled EPS foam has three potential uses: (1) mostly post-industrial in-house scrap and waste recycle put back into the process to combine with virgin EPS foam and (2) post-consumer recycled EPS to combine with virgin EPS or (3) used for non-EPS applications as an addition in virgin polystyrene and HIPS resin applications. 

Independent research by Wilson Jene Consulting, Pittsburgh, PA, explored finding potential sources of recycled EPS materials for consumption in the U.S. for the third use cited above. The U.S. market for PS resin is significantly larger (roughly a factor of 10 times larger) than the EPS foam market. Surprisingly, sources of recycled EPS are limited. The research found that although many EPS molders collect and use recycled EPS in their processes, the number of recyclers selling these types of materials is somewhat limited and many purchasers of these materials are located overseas. Holly Wilson-Jene says, “Knowing there are many non-foam plastic processors around the country that could utilize recycled EPS as a feedstock, these findings indicate that the demand might in fact be there if more of this material was available.” This sounds like a chicken and egg analogy. Wilson-Jene cites several reasons this material is in such high demand:

Recycled EPS is lower cost compared to virgin PS and is generally a high-quality feedstock with good physical properties. 

Because raw material costs can often represent 50 to 70 percent of the total cost of the manufactured product, the availability of a lower cost feedstock can enable manufacturers to be competitive in specific applications and markets. 

For some competitive markets and applications, the availability of a lower cost feedstock can help keep manufacturing located in the U.S.

So what is preventing this demand from being used? One of the reasons goes back to the earlier mentioned-EPS foam is 95 to 98 percent air. One cannot economically transport bulky foam from location A to location B. Or can one?

 

The solution is a process called densification, which can make EPS foam 50 to 90 times denser. Whereas a full 53-ft trailer load of loosely stacked EPS foam usually weighs approximately 2,000 pounds, compacted EPS foam that has been processed through a densifier can be shipped as a regular 40,000 lb full truck load (T/L) shipment.

 

Densification equipment can pay for itself often under two years in two ways:
1. Significant savings from reduced trash collection costs and landfill tipping costs; and
2. Revenue generated from the sale of the densified material and its further conversion for injection molding or extrusion processes. 

The big question remains: How can this demand for recycled EPS be filled? Over the last 20 years or so, significant advances in densification equipment and the installation of many units across the U.S. has occurred. Some units even run on the more accessible 120 volt AC current vs 240 volt current. A list of suppliers can be found at www.packagingdigest.com/densifiers.

Small mobile densification units have been fabricated by enterprising recyclers, utilizing existing smaller EPS densification equipment which is then mounted on a truck and accompanied by a power generation unit. This grass roots approach will gain momentum as densification equipment manufacturers pursue this opportunity and overcome the equipment challenges and support grows for local recycling drives or other types of innovative recycling activity. 

Some municipalities have used grants to install equipment that then generates a revenue stream for that municipality. Densification equipment is needed close to the source “locally” because of the lightweight nature of EPS foam and the high cost of transporting lightweight bulky materials. The densification process can be performed by the company generating the demand or through third party recyclers. The EPS foam recycling infrastructure is the “egg” in the previous analogy and EPS foam demand is the “chicken.” Which comes first?

Brand owners and retailers with significant EPS packaging materials should reconsider the possibilities as they face challenges of developing more sustainable operations and zero waste programs. Gut feelings suggest that consumers would embrace the ability to recycle EPS foam if there were readily available recycle outlets. And with a typical payback of two years or less for equipment, recycling EPS often makes financial sense. 

One way brand owners and retailers can accomplish this is by working together where retail stores are clustered together in a concise geographical area such as a mall complex to recycle waste EPS packaging materials. This could be accomplished by a recycling alliance, which would identify a site location within the area for a densifier operation managed by a recycler or brand owner. A second opportunity is for municipal recycling centers to develop an EPS recycling program using funding through grants and identifying marketplace demand for the recycled materials.

There are possibilities galore if we used our (recycled) resources more efficiently. There is a wave of change occurring in the plastic recycling market place. For example, non-bottle clear rigid plastic containers, plastic films/bags and larger non-packaging plastic parts are being added to recycle streams daily. Maybe now is the time to creatively identify more opportunities where recycled EPS can be added to this changing marketplace.

 

Jeff Timm is a Plastic Packaging & Adhesive Business Development Consultant, specializing in bioplastics and understanding of the cradle-to-cradle value chain to achieve sustainability goals. He is a frequent contributor to plastic and packaging journals as well as the bi-monthly Packaging Blog for www.adhesives.org, the web portal for the Adhesive & Sealant Council (ASC). He can be reached at Timm Consulting jeff@timmconsulting.net, www.linkedin.com/in/jefftimm, www.twitter.com/bioplasticman.

 

Moore Recycling Associates Inc., 707-935-3390
www.moorerecycling.com

Wilson Jene Consulting LLC, 412-513-9142
www.wilsonjeneconsulting.com

 

 

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Honest Splash packaging appeals to on-the-go families






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Posted by Jenni Spinner, Senior Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/22/2013 9:25:00 AM





Honest Splash juice bottlesHonest Tea, the nation’s top-selling organic bottled tea company, is launching a new beverage line called Honest Splash. The 70 calorie juice-based drinks are sweetened only with organic fruit juice and contain between 30-31% juice. Honest Splash is available in re-closable 12 fl. oz. recyclable plastic bottles, and sold both individually and in six-bottle packages. Honest Splash is available in three varieties: Berry Good Lemonade, Goodness Grapeness and Super Fruit Punch.

The new beverage line is an evolution of the Honest Kids® brand, which accounts for more than one-third of Honest Tea’s total business. “Honest Splash is a great fit for older kids, or kids on-the-go, who need the convenience of a larger, re-closable container. It still meets the needs of parents who want to provide lower-sugar beverages,” says Honest Tea’s co-founder and TeaEO Seth Goldman.

 

Honest Splash meets the American Beverage Association’s School Beverage Guidelines for High Schools which permit drinks with 66 calories per 8 fluid ounces, up to 12 fl. oz., to be sold in high schools.

 

Individual Honest Splash bottles are available in select retailers including more than 1,250 Target® Cafés. The six-bottle packages will be sold exclusively at Target in more than 1,100 stores from mid-March through the end of June at an everyday price of $5.49, and will roll out to other retailers starting July 2013.

 

About Honest Tea

 

Honest Tea seeks to create and promote great-tasting, healthier, organic beverages and extend economic opportunities to communities in need. Founded in 1998 in Bethesda, MD, Honest Tea is the nation’s top-selling organic bottled tea company specializing in beverages that are ‘just a tad’ sweet. Honest Tea’s product lines include: Honest Tea ready-to-drink bottled teas, Honest Ade® and Honest Kids organic thirst quenchers, and new Honest Fizz® naturally sweetened zero calorie sodas. All tea, juice drinks and kids varieties are USDA Organic, and all tea varieties are Fair Trade CertifiedTM. In addition to being ranked by The Huffington Post as one of the leading “8 Revolutionary Socially Responsible Companies,” Honest Tea is a multi-year winner of awards from the Alliance for Workplace Excellence. Honest Tea has won Men’s Health magazine’s “Best Green Tea” for five years running and in 2012 was named one of Women’s Health magazine’s “125 Best Packaged Foods for Women.” Honest Tea is an independent operating unit of The Coca-Cola Company.

 

Source: Honest Tea
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Arrowhead video celebrates beauty of bottled water recycling






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/20/2013 1:23:15 PM





Arrowhead logoArrowhead Brand 100% Mountain Spring Water—the brand that introduced its new 0.5L ReBorn bottle made with 50 percent recycled plastic (rPET) and launched its “Recycling is a Beautiful Thing” campaign in November 2012—is taking another step toward educating consumers about the value of recycling with the unveiling of an innovative, new stop-motion video. The video supports the brand’s commitment to getting consumers excited about recycling and increasing recycling rates by featuring visuals that were created out of recycled materials. 

Produced by Bent Image Lab based in Portland, Ore., the one-minute video tells the story of the endless possibilities that can come from recycling. The video informs consumers that most recyclable plastic bottles actually end up in the trash—in California alone, more than 2.8 billion plastic bottles ended up in landfills in 2011[1]—but stresses that the more we recycle today, the more materials that can be reused tomorrow. The animatic eventually portrays a picture of a 3-D landscape, nature’s masterpiece, followed by an Arrowhead label from which the 0.5L ReBorn bottle emerges. 

The video was created to emphasize the message behind the brand’s “Recycling is a Beautiful Thing” campaign, which was launched in November 2012. “We’re excited to demonstrate that recycled materials have significant second life utility,” says Gigi Leporati, brand manager, Arrowhead 100% Mountain Spring Water. “If you look closely at the imagery in the video, you’ll see it translates some recyclable materials found in landfills into an artistic and environmentally thoughtful statement. Through this video, we hope to motivate consumers to recycle more and think about recycling in a new way.”

 

The interactive campaign is hosted on a dedicated tab on the Arrowhead brand Facebook page. In addition to the video, the page also highlights informative statistics about recycling and showcases still life and found object art pieces crafted from recycled materials. 

The 0.5L ReBorn bottle launch was celebrated in the San Francisco area with a volunteer recycling and beautification event in partnership with Keep California Beautiful (KCB) on America Recycles Day. To further assist local recycling efforts in San Francisco, Arrowhead unveiled four innovative solar-powered BigBelly waste and recycling stations at the event, which the brand is sponsoring for one year. 

To learn more about the Arrowhead ReBorn bottle and experience the beauty of recycling, please visit the brand on Facebook where you can also watch the new video and share it with your friends. To read more about NestleWaters North America’s commitment to sustainability, please visit www.nestle-watersna.com.

[1] CalRecycle. Calendar Year 2011 Report of Beverage Container Sales, Returns, Redemption and Recycling Rates. www.calrecycle.ca.gov/Publications/Documents/BevContainer%5C2012013.pdf.

 

Source: Nestle Waters North America

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How Chemical Analysis Outsourcing Services Can Aid Business

How Chemical Analysis Outsourcing Services Can Aid Business

Chemical analysis and materials testing laboratories can help businesses with a myriad of complex scientific and technical issues. Customized chemical testing and analytical outsourcing services can answer perplexing, yet important questions, such as:

Why is my product failing?
What is this unknown material?
What is the source of product contamination?
Why is my competitor’s product failure rate lower?
What are the ingredients of this sample?

Below are three specific examples of how a chemical analysis and materials testing lab aided companies in finding a solution to a difficult problem.

Example #1 – Product Contamination Studies Find the Best Supplier
Industry: Food
Issue: Selecting the right plastic bottle supplier
Solution: For cost and safety reasons, a baby food supplier wished to change from glass jars to plastic bottles for its baby food product line. Safety concerns were paramount, since plastics can leach chemicals such as additives. The company had identified 3 plastic bottle suppliers. The challenge was to determine which plastic bottles would release the least amount of chemicals into the product. Scientists at an analytical lab conducted extractable and leachable studies by subjecting the plastic bottle to foods and temperatures equivalent to real world conditions. The leached chemicals were detected and quantified at parts per million (PPM) levels, using techniques such as liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography. The study determined the plastics packaging supplier with the safest bottles.

Example #2 – Deformulation for Competitive Product Analysis
Industry: Consumer Products
Issue: A competitor from Japan sold a superior pen
Solution: A ball-point pen manufacturer wished to determine why the ink from a Japanese competitor produced a brighter color and dried more quickly than its ink. A chemical analysis lab conducted a complete deformulation of the competing product to separate the various components using a series of solvent extractions and preparative chromatographic techniques. Identification of the ingredients was made using NMR, GC/MS and FT-IR spectroscopy. As identified by ICP-MS, the competitive product contained a metallic compound, which acted as a catalyst during the curing process causing the ink to dry quicker. The additive that was responsible for the brightness was also identified.

Example #3 – Product Failure Identification
Industry
: Automotive
Issue: Auto bumper peeling and breakage
Solution: An auto manufacturer was seeing premature breakage and peeling on a polymer-based car bumper. A blend of polymers was used to manufacture the bumper. Experts analyzed the separation of layers with high-resolution microscopy techniques and saw adhesion failure at the separation site. A compatibilizer was needed to blend the polymers completely. A FT-IR analysis revealed there was no compatibilizer present in the bumper product that was failing.

Summary

As shown by the above examples, companies can turn to chemical analysis and material testing laboratories for valuable insight into competitive product formulations, batch-to-batch variations, and trade secrets in order to increase productivity, revenues and competitiveness.

Neil Thanedar is the President at Avomeen Analytical Services – a leading provider of chemical analysis services.  Avomeen specializes in investigative analysis, deformulation, materials testing and scientific expert witness testimony.  For a free consultation, Avomeen’s analysis experts can be reached at (800) 930-5450 or info@avomeen.com.


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water filtration bottle

water filtration bottle

There are water filtration bottles available for purchase in many places today.  A water filtration bottle may be the perfect solution for some people.  These water filtration bottles not only purify water but can be reused so you can drastically reduce the amount you spend on water bottles and reduce the amount of plastic you are throwing away.  These water bottle purifiers only remove items like that chlorine taste and microbial cysts.  Microbial cysts, like giardia, can cause severe stomach upset in children, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems, so a water bottle purifier of this nature might be a good purchase for those in these groups.

 

The water filtration bottle is great for people on the go, for use during exercise, and for use just about anywhere.  Water filtration bottles are not only for convenience.  There is also a water filtration bottle called the Lifesaver bottle which is used in areas where drinking water supplies are limited.  These areas may be under developed countries, disaster stricken areas or areas experiencing a severe drought.  This type of water filtration bottle has a much stronger filter than those that come in your local store.  The filters on these bottles filter out impurities such as metals, dirt, viruses, bacteria and most types of microbial organisms.  This type of water filtration bottle has saved many lives, by providing clean water to people who need it.  The water can be used for drinking, in medical procedures and for us in various cleaning needs.

Are you looking for more information regarding water filtration bottle ?  Visit http://www.best-water-filter-guide.com/ today!


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BANGKOK -ECO RAT TRAP MADE WITH A PLASTIC BOTTLE-PIEGE A RAT FAIT MAIN- THAILAND SUMMER 2009

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Fair trade gifts the recycled way

Fair trade gifts the recycled way

Consumers are encouraged to recycle just about anything possible including the packaging by-products of our weekly food shop such as tins, bottles, plastic containers and foil. Local councils provide some of us with a confusing range of coloured bins for an array of household refuse and most supermarkets have recycling centres for glass, foil and paper to cloths, plastic bottles, tin cans and cardboard.

My own understanding is quite a simplistic one. There has now become such a massive drive for recycling and does seem to make perfect sense to re-use materials, reforming them to make more bottles, tins, paper and plastic. My washing up ritual now involves religiously washing out all the various packaging items because I have a sense of duty to make a contribution to preserving our planet’s natural resources.

Following in the same vein, there are a number of recycled substrates used across the fair trade giftware sector too. At the heart of fair trade lies the use of sustainable materials like wood and jute as well as recycled materials such as tin, paper or even shells! So fair trade products can sit comfortably within the eco-friendly realm.

In addition to this, the main point of the fair trade movement is to produce its goods within the ethical framework of fair wages and working conditions.

Both aspects encompass the fair trade ethos helping to make the movement synonymous with eco-friendly and ethically produced products from consumables to wood carvings, jute rugs, bags, picture frames to paper and tin.

The first example I would like to share with you is the special range of mussel shell picture frames. I was blown away by their beauty, innovation and craftsmanship. A little fishing village in Bali have found an ingenious way to re-use the discarded mussel shells. The first thing is they have not just glued an arrangement of grey mussel shells to a wooden picture frame. Instead, they have carefully cut away the grey outer layer of the shell to reveal a stunning opalescent bluey green shell underneath. They have then carefully created a contrasting symmetrical pattern of engraved ridges which are shown off when the light catches the various angles.

This kind of craft technique with shells is also used to inlay plates and bowls giving a montage of green and blue tones like fish scales, creating objects of great beauty and skill. The delicate calming green colour of these beautiful shells resonates with the serenity and tranquillity of Indonesia made by its native people.

Mussel shells have also been used to make an almost ethereal cubed tealight holder by breaking them up and setting in an opaque resin. When the tealight is lit, the shapes and colours of the shell pieces become transparent against the glow of the flame.

While on the subject of fair trade tealight holders, there are some fantastic holders carefully handcrafted from recycled tin collected from factories within the village vicinity. The scraps certainly have been put to good use in creating something functional for the consumer. The designs are quirky and are predominantly aimed to appeal to the western and commercial markets rather than their own.

Examples include tin tealight holders that are brightly hand painted to depict roosters, flowers, butterflies, fish, hedgehogs, frogs, chickens and even Christmas trees. So something for everyone!

As well as being made from recycled materials, fair trade gifts are also made from sustainable materials such as jute prolific in India. Jute provides a plentiful resource of natural material for a wide range of products. The material can be brought cheaply and weaved into mats, rugs, bags and belts then sold on to make a healthy profit margin.

Since jute is a natural fibre it is 100% biodegradable enhancing further the advantage of buying this kind of natural product. By using this kind of material, we are helping to cut down on wastage otherwise accumulated by the notorious plastic or man-made materials.

Other examples include recycled sari material which is re-stitched onto the covers of fair trade notebooks, jewellery boxes or bags to create colour and dimension sometimes embellished with sequins.

So if you stumble across a range of fair trade gifts you have found something rather special. You have peace of mind knowing its products are made from sustainable and natural materials and have been produced entirely through ethical means.

Hand made fair trade gifts by Belinda Bryant. Fair trade gifts for everyone can be found at Indigo Ocean Trading.


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Plastic Recycling

Plastic Recycling

Plastic recycling is another form of recycling in which materials that are wasted in the shape of plastic can be used and thus they are found to provide many benefits to the society. Recycling also helps people to keep the environment safe and healthy and even friendly too. The wasted plastic can be used to make new products which can be of useful to the people and thus they will also provide many benefits to them as well. It has also been found out that the new products that had been formed are of completely new shape and form and thus they do not match the original form of that product.

It can be seen that many new products can be formed and an example could be taken of plastic of bottles which in a way and through a procedure is melted which as a result is used to form the plastic tables and chair. The size of the new product can vary. In this all the wasted plastic can thus be brought into use and this is basically done by some of the companies which are mainly working for the benefits of the society and even the people living in the society as well. Furthermore it has also been found out that the products that are made of plastic cannot be recycled further which means that they cannot be brought into any use. The new form of product being made is exactly not the same type of plastic that had been used up before in the making of that product.

In the making of new form and shapes with plastic people have to pass through different challenges and those challenges may be quite meaningful to people and even in some cases they may also be having a bad impact on the people. All the procedures that is required in the making of the plastic needs to be passed through some complicated steps. The plastic is somehow found to be very hardly mixed with other types of materials that are used in it. This all due to that weight that is being carried on by the plastic. The weight of plastic is greater as compared to some other things. The melting of the plastic is a difficult process so the melting of it with many other forms of plastic may even be more complex as it would not be mixed correctly with other plastic. All the plastics which are of one type will be gathered together leaving behind all the other forms of plastic.

The plastics which cannot be recycled or burnt had been used up by the companies to a greater extent and on the other hand the dyes and other colored materials and plastics which are used in the formation of plastic are also considered to be a threat for the company which in turn is quite a problem for the company to let it pass through the procedure and steps. Before the recycling phase to take place for the plastics they are gathered according to their texture and even the code that has been associated to them.

Visit <a rel=”nofollow” onclick=”javascript:_gaq.push(['_trackPageview', '/outgoing/article_exit_link']);” href=”http://www.alpcorecycling.com”>Trash Removal New York</a>, <a rel=”nofollow” onclick=”javascript:_gaq.push(['_trackPageview', '/outgoing/article_exit_link']);” href=”http://www.alpcorecycling.com”>Recycling Monroe</a>


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Methods And Means to Make a Difference – Recycle

Methods And Means to Make a Difference – Recycle

I have recently relocated to the city of Knoxville, Tennessee and have been pleasantly startled by the extent of the consideration towards environmental friendliness the city has as a whole. Everywhere I look this is evidenced – just the other day I was driving and noticed a message stating “This vehicle operates on clean biofuel” on the back of a city bus. To see an entire city displaying such environmental awareness and dedication to sustainability is definitely encouraging!

More and more, this is becoming the norm for cities. As their inhabitants are educating themselves on the need to preserve our environment and treat it with care, they come to expect and often demand that the city they live in take steps to do. In the case of Knoxville, trees are planted, biofuels and other clean energy sources are used, public transportation is accessible and convenient, and most of all recycling programs are implemented. This isn’t just exclusive to Knoxville, either. Dozens of cities now offer curbside pickup, and failing that there is still almost always some form of dedicated recycling center in place.

Recycling as a Lifestyle
As the scale of the institutions that are now backing eco-friendly living continues to increase, it is becoming increasingly realistic for everyday people to reprioritize and reorganize their lives to do the same. This does not have to be a major upheaval, as simple things like recycling can be the first major steps taken to great benefit, and without the need for inconvenient or uncomfortable changes. Consider what is necessary for recycling:

- You purchase the same products you always purchase, or if you’re ambitious take a little extra time to notice the type of packaging products come in and opt for those that are able to be recycled.

- When it’s time to discard plastic bottles, aluminum cans, cardboard, newspapers and other things, instead you set them aside in bags or boxes tucked away underneath sinks, inside closets or out of the way in the garage.

– If your city offers curbside pickup of recyclable goods then you simply place the bagged recyclables outside with the rest of your trash. If not, then you set aside about an hour (give or take) once a month to bring your collected materials to your local recycling center.

Considerations for Recycling
Prior to beginning to collect and separate your recyclables, it is wise to take some time to research the kinds of materials your city’s recycling program can accept. Not all cities are equipped to deal with every kind of material which is able to be recycled. For example, in Clearwater, Florida where I used to live they simply stopped taking glass products altogether. Before you spend extra time washing and storing all these items, check around on your city’s website or get in touch with local officials to find out what is accepted and what is not.

Some cities have independent recycling centers that will still pay you for bringing in certain recyclable goods. The city I lived in before Knoxville, New Tazewell, Tennessee has a center that pays people to bring in aluminum cans or any other kind of scrap metal, big or small.

Recycling is of immeasurable importance as our society, and humanity as a whole, reexamines its priorities and restructures its way of life in order to coexist with the natural balance of things and live sustainable and healthy lives. Like the song says, the old road is rapidly gaining, please get out of the new one if you can’t lend your hand.

CB is a competent generator of net-based facts and an accomplished creative agent, and presently deals with subject matter including JBL Pa Speakers and JBL car speakers.


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