Aliment Accentuation

Dean & DeLuca aims to get back to its roots with an in-house redesign project spanning the entire private label collection. “It was important for us to get everything redesigned and rebranded back to our core elements. Now, the customer can identify our products more easily on the shelf, and they standout as being our own and as having a consistent core brand style,” Jenny Burgett, graphic designer, brand identitiy and packaging, Dean & DeLuca, comments.

Utilizing the brand’s core colors of black, white, silver, PMS 877 for printed labels and PMS 432 gray: the redesign strives to keep packaging as white and light as possible. Taking a cue from the Neo-classical, minimalist look of the brand’s retail spaces. Glass bottles and jars are used throughout the collection to emphasize a natural look. For products the brand could not show, due to the nature of the packaging, such as the boxed baking mixes, photography was employed.

A clean sans serif typeface is consistent throughout the line, and denotes the product category; while a cursive font, based on the handwriting of one of the founders, Jack Ceglic, depicts the variety on pack. “We wanted to revert back to our own history and the value in that, so we decided to bring that font back into all of our packaging. It represents a strong part of our brand history,” Burgett explains.

A palette of secondary brand colors is used as a guide when choosing accent colors for products that need to be distinguished on shelf. For instance, the syrup and dipping oil collections, both featuring four flavor varieties, utilize the palette of secondary brand colors. However, for the brand’s 10 glass packaged salts, only the primary color palette was utilized, as the unique coloring and textures of the salts serve as an adequate differentiator on shelf.

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Snapshots: June/July 2013 Issue

Aliment Accentuation
Packaging that says, ‘It’s all about the food.’

Dean & DeLuca aims to get back to its roots with an in-house redesign project spanning the entire private label collection. “It was important for us to get everything redesigned and rebranded back to our core elements. Now, the customer can identify our products more easily on the shelf, and they standout as being our own and as having a consistent core brand style,” Jenny Burgett, graphic designer, brand identitiy and packaging, Dean & DeLuca, comments.

Utilizing the brand’s core colors of black, white, silver, PMS 877 for printed labels and PMS 432 gray: the redesign strives to keep packaging as white and light as possible. Taking a cue from the Neo-classical, minimalist look of the brand’s retail spaces. Glass bottles and jars are used throughout the collection to emphasize a natural look. For products the brand could not show, due to the nature of the packaging, such as the boxed baking mixes, photography was employed.

A clean sans serif typeface is consistent throughout the line, and denotes the product category; while a cursive font, based on the handwriting of one of the founders, Jack Ceglic, depicts the variety on pack. “We wanted to revert back to our own history and the value in that, so we decided to bring that font back into all of our packaging. It represents a strong part of our brand history,” Burgett explains.

A palette of secondary brand colors is used as a guide when choosing accent colors for products that need to be distinguished on shelf. For instance, the syrup and dipping oil collections, both featuring four flavor varieties, utilize the palette of secondary brand colors. However, for the brand’s 10 glass packaged salts, only the primary color palette was utilized, as the unique coloring and textures of the salts serve as an adequate differentiator on shelf.

 

Branded Luxury
Italian Alps channeled in artisan chocolate package design.

Nestled in the Italian alpine resort community of Breuil-Cervinia, a boutique hotel by the name of Principe Delle Nevi, or “Prince of Snow” beckons ski enthusiasts worldwide. Plan B Creative Team (www.planbproject.com), Tel-Aviv, Israel, took on the task of creating a sub-brand chocolate line for the hotel.

Dubbed “The Chocolate”, Plan B’s brief was to create a branded luxury packaging for the hotel’s unique handmade chocolates. “Our goal was to combine the new and the old. A mix between classic Italian design and clean and modern elements, reflecting the hotel’s branding and interior design.” explains Max Gat-mor, creative director and partner, Plan B.  The logo that appears on the packaging is a mix between a contemporary typeface and the brand name; an image of the “Matterhorn” mountain, the central view from the hotel, is the focal point and consistent throughout The Chocolate line. The chocolatier’s autograph appears on the sleeve and labeling, adding to the artisanal quality of the collection.

Hotel Principe Delle Nevi offers a selection of luxury chocolate pralines, housed in high-quality thick duplex paper. Israeli printing and packaging service supplier Ravgon collaborated with Plan B to conduct material research and testing until the current box was developed. For efficiency and budget consciousness, the custom chocolate box is printed entirely on a single sheet of paper, using only three Pantone colors. Hot stamping the Hotel Principe Delle Nevi’s crest onto the package further reinforces the high-end appeal.

Brushed aluminum bags, sourced through a large coffee packaging vendor evoke a contemporary look and feel. Digitally printed labels with a complementary color palette provide the brand with flexibility to add new colors as seasonal flavors are introduced into the line. The artisanal quality is further continued as a “freehand” font type was selected for the labels as a flavor descriptor.

 

Sweet Reunion
The Mike and Ike split is settled.

Mike and Ike, the infamous duo of the Just Born Inc. family settled their differences and reconvened, after taking a year to explore separate interests. The fruit-flavored candy brand was revitalized, with a complete packaging redesign, by BrandFirst (www.brandfirstnj.com). A redesign was in order, for the brand to be more relevant with the target consumer, ages 13-19.

“The creative brief outlined the need for three different design families: Fun & Energetic, Cool & Hip, and Futuristic & Trendy,” explains Donald Huston, Mike and Ike, brand manager. Huston comments on the redesign capabilities of BrandFirst: “Their design creativity, confirmed by extensive consumer testing, led us to a fantastic design that is new and fresh but still very much tied to the historical visual cornerstones of the brand.” On the logo, the word “and” is now situated on a vertical plane between Mike and Ike; dimension applied to the background generates the sense of motion.

“We introduced black as a mainstay color, to work across all of the flavors of the brand,” explains Amy Happ, BrandFirst, creative director. “That really gave it the edge that we were looking for, and with that we built on it with the futuristic background.” Gone are cartoony fruit illustrations; custom illustrations featuring photo realistic quality now grace Mike and Ike packs. The on-pack “bean” graphics were given a sleek redesign, now debossed and featuring a translucent appearance.

Mike and Ike’s color palette expanded with the redesign; transitioning from a spot-color printing process to a seven-color printing process. “Our suppliers are delivering on the expanded gamut printing process that we need to really deliver on the new eye catching design.” explains Huston.

 

Sensual Structure
Condom brand enters new territory.

Church & Dwight wanted to address a new market with its Trojan brand, so Trojan Lubricants was created. To develop a visual identity for the collection of three varieties of gender-neutral personal lubricants, Church & Dwight approached strategic partners, Product Ventures (productventures.com), for structural design and Colangelo (colangelo-sm.com), for graphic design and communication of the outer carton.

Product Ventures’ client director on the Trojan project, Sarah Palomba recaps the design firm’s goals, “The idea was that the package would be engaging, feature dynamic color, and appeal to both sexes through its alluring and captivating form,” The environment of use was yet another design element addressed, “Another key design goal for the product was understanding the environment of use and therefore we sought to make the package as easy-to-handle and intuitive to use as possible.” continues Palomba.

The PP cap is fully integrated into the curved PET bottle shape, assisting with the one-handed-operation design. A luxurious gold ink, bearing the Trojan logo is pad-printed on the front of the hourglass bottle, versus a lamination process, which could potentially get slick. The jewel-tone bottles evoke a premium feel via use of a pearlescent finish. Peter Clarke, CEO of Product Ventures reflects, “The branding on the bottle is minimal so that the structure becomes the primary visual. The form evokes a passionate embrace with the intertwining curves and undulating surfaces.”

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Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association challenges ‘natural’ plastic additives






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/18/2013 2:32:32 PM





Oxo Bio logoThe Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association is challenging the effectiveness of a recently-developed class of plastics containing additives described as “natural”, “enzymatic” or “microbiodegradable”.

 

These additives, which are not oxo-biodegradable, are being marketed as promoting biodegradation of a host of polymers within a few months to several years, even when buried deep in landfill.

 

An OPA statement (www.biodeg.org) reads: “It seems reasonable to believe that the additives themselves will biodegrade, but will they make the plastic biodegrade? It is difficult to believe on the published scientific evidence that incorporation of these additives into a polymeric matrix will render the resultant plastic article biodegradable at all, and on the basis of known scientific principle it is hard to see how it can. Biodegradation of the additive could give a false reading in a CO2-evolution test, suggesting that the plastic itself is biodegrading.”

 

The new additives appear to consist of a starch or polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix often extended with mineral filler, with no pro-degradant catalyst salts in the composition.

 

The idea seems to be to help plastic disintegrate but, unlike an oxo-biodegradable additive, it does not change the plastic into a biodegradable material.

 

Polyethylene and polypropylene do not present a metabolic pathway for enzymes and it is precisely because of these properties that they are useful for food-packaging.

 

In addition, degradation of PVC may produce toxic residues that are highly dangerous, and which may interfere with the survival of the biodegrading microorganisms.

 

A film made with the new additive was analyzed and found to contain inorganic filler derived from CaCO3 and some primary antioxidant, and approx. 400 parts per million of a secondary stabilizer. No other chemical compounds were found. Based on this analysis, these products cannot biodegrade.

 

There seems to be ambiguity in the testing by companies promoting these products. It is for example sometimes unclear whether the data refers to the additive or the final product.

 

Some of the testing seems to be on blends of material using much higher rates of additive than recommended. This will obviously alter its properties, processing-characteristics and recyclability, but the strength and fitness-for-purpose of products extended in such a manner must be doubted.

 

Further, if biodegradation is by an enzymatic process, the enzymes are unlikely to survive the processing conditions needed to create the plastic in the first place.

 

The OPA is not persuaded that these “enzymatic” additives will work as claimed.

For further information, visit www.biodeg.org.

 







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Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association challenges ‘natural’ plastic additives






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 3/18/2013 2:32:32 PM





Oxo Bio logoThe Oxo-biodegradable Plastics Association is challenging the effectiveness of a recently-developed class of plastics containing additives described as “natural”, “enzymatic” or “microbiodegradable”.

 

These additives, which are not oxo-biodegradable, are being marketed as promoting biodegradation of a host of polymers within a few months to several years, even when buried deep in landfill.

 

An OPA statement (www.biodeg.org) reads: “It seems reasonable to believe that the additives themselves will biodegrade, but will they make the plastic biodegrade? It is difficult to believe on the published scientific evidence that incorporation of these additives into a polymeric matrix will render the resultant plastic article biodegradable at all, and on the basis of known scientific principle it is hard to see how it can. Biodegradation of the additive could give a false reading in a CO2-evolution test, suggesting that the plastic itself is biodegrading.”

 

The new additives appear to consist of a starch or polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix often extended with mineral filler, with no pro-degradant catalyst salts in the composition.

 

The idea seems to be to help plastic disintegrate but, unlike an oxo-biodegradable additive, it does not change the plastic into a biodegradable material.

 

Polyethylene and polypropylene do not present a metabolic pathway for enzymes and it is precisely because of these properties that they are useful for food-packaging.

 

In addition, degradation of PVC may produce toxic residues that are highly dangerous, and which may interfere with the survival of the biodegrading microorganisms.

 

A film made with the new additive was analyzed and found to contain inorganic filler derived from CaCO3 and some primary antioxidant, and approx. 400 parts per million of a secondary stabilizer. No other chemical compounds were found. Based on this analysis, these products cannot biodegrade.

 

There seems to be ambiguity in the testing by companies promoting these products. It is for example sometimes unclear whether the data refers to the additive or the final product.

 

Some of the testing seems to be on blends of material using much higher rates of additive than recommended. This will obviously alter its properties, processing-characteristics and recyclability, but the strength and fitness-for-purpose of products extended in such a manner must be doubted.

 

Further, if biodegradation is by an enzymatic process, the enzymes are unlikely to survive the processing conditions needed to create the plastic in the first place.

 

The OPA is not persuaded that these “enzymatic” additives will work as claimed.

For further information, visit www.biodeg.org.

 







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Soap vs. Shower Gel vs. Bath Salts – The Pros and Cons

Soap vs. Shower Gel vs. Bath Salts – The Pros and Cons

Most people use soap by default to clean their bodies when showering, but shower gels and bath salts are two other very popular bath products. Asides from daily cleaning, these are also popular gift items that can be used for just about any event. Before choosing which to use for your daily routine or what to give out as a party favor or gift, it is important to weigh the pros and cons of using each bath product.

 

If soaps are part of the souvenir gifts then know that the three different kinds of bath products – soap, gel, and bath salts – may be agreeable to some and not as agreeable to others. Here are some of the pros and cons of each item:

 

Soap

Pros: Soap can come in bars, soap chips, and sheets. The bars can come in so many different sizes, shapes and colors, which make them great gifts for themed parties. The soap chips are great for they can be placed in cute sealed jars and beribboned. Then there are the soap sheets. These sheets can be shaped into flowers. Some are even made into roses and presented to girlfriends as a gift. They not only look like roses but they are rose scented too. Soap is very easy to store. They can be used for the bathroom, the powder room or the kitchen and are usually the least expensive bath product.

 

Cons: There is some soap which can be very harsh and it is really best to find out exactly what the main ingredients are in the soap. There are some people who react strongly to lye while some can react strongly to some oils in the soap. Hypoallergenic soaps are also a tad more expensive than the ordinary ones and fancily shaped hypoallergenic soaps are harder to find. Soap is also the least glamorous bathing item when compared to gel and bath salts.

 

Gel

Pros: A lot of people prefer receiving gels in dispensers as gifts for they are colorful, attractive, scented and are just plain pretty. The gels are really attractive packages and there is no denying that someone who receives one will definitely use it. So far, gels are one of the more popular forms of the soaps. Since they come in a body, they are also easier to transport when traveling.

 

Cons: Some containers can break as most are made of thin plastic. Having one break will result in leakage. Also, some people may not like the slimy texture and it is a little harder than just running a bar of soap over your body as you have to keep pumping the gel when you need more.

 

Bath Salts

Pros: Everyone loves bath salts for they can be used in times when the need to relax the muscles is a must, especially after a stressful day. Soaking in a tub of warm water and bath salts will surely inspire everyone and knowing that the salts are there will make them even more grateful. Bath salts are colorful as well so they make beautiful gift items when placed in clear jars.

 

Cons: Bath salts needed or not, are always welcome for they are the kind of gift that could be kept for times of emergencies and knowing they are there and not having to rush out to get some is more a pro than a con. Bath salts are typically the most expensive bath product. Another downside is that they can sometimes clog the drains in your shower if the salt pieces are too big.

Jamie Highland is a writer for wedding, family, and baby shower topics. To browse through some soap baby shower favors or to check out some baby picture frame favors, go to My Baby Shower Favors. Note: You can reprint this article in your ezine, blog, or website as long as the credits remain intact and hyperlinks remain active.

 

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Make Your Own Aromatherapy Bath Salts in Ten Minutes or Less

Make Your Own Aromatherapy Bath Salts in Ten Minutes or Less

Aromatherapy bath salts are one of the quickest, easiest goodies to make for the bath – and one of the most healing. With just a few simple ingredients you can make your own aromatherapy bath salts to ease your aching back, calm your frazzled nerves or relax yourself for a deep, restful sleep.

We all need down time, and we all need to have fun. Life is so busy these days that it can be hard to carve out the time. Making your own aromatherapy bath salts is a great way to give yourself a break.

First, you give yourself some ‘fun’ time by making your scented bath salts – mixing, stirring, smelling… and, most especially, experimenting. Don’t be afraid to blend together a few of your favorite essential oils to create your own custom scent. Play! The creative process is half the fun.

Second, you actually have to lie in the bath for a while (here’s your down-time) to use your aromatherapy bath salts. Give yourself candles, a glass of wine or tea, soothing music – all those good, stress-draining, nerve-calming accessories. Lock the door and slide into warm, scented bliss – your own hand made, master crafted aromatherapy bath salts, created just for you!

Aromatherapy Bath Salts Quick Trick

If you honestly don’t have time to make bath salts but you still want some aromatic down-time in the tub, try this instant ‘cheat’. Add 1 to 2 cups of Epsom Salt to your hot running bathwater. Pour a tablespoon of vegetable oil (any type will do) into a small glass. Add 10 drops of your favorite essential oil. Adjust the water temperature and slide into the tub. Pour in the essential oil mixture and swish it around a bit. Lie back and relax.


10 Minute Aromatherapy Bath Salt Recipe

3 cups Epsom Salt
1/2 cup Baking Soda
15 drops of your favorite Essential Oil (or one of the blends below)
Optional: 10 drops of your choice of food coloring

Measure salt and baking soda into a large glass, ceramic or stainless steel bowl (not plastic – it will absorb the essential oils.)
[Three minutes]

Stir together the salt and baking soda using a metal spoon (a wooden spoon will absorb the essential oils.)
[One minute]

Drop in the essential oils and food coloring, placing each drop in its own little spot on top of the salt.
[Two minutes]

Stir until thoroughly mixed.
[One minute, maybe two]

Pour your essential oil bath salt mixture in a dark glass or PET plastic jar. Click on the following link to learn why you should use dark glass. http://www.easy-aromatherapy-recipes.com/storing-essential-oils.html
[One minute]

That’s it! Nine minutes (plus one extra for spills or finding your glasses.) Quick, easy, painless!

It’s best to let your aromatherapy bath salts cure at least 24 hours before using them so the salt can really absorb the aroma.

Use about one cup of salts per bath. This aromatherapy bath salt recipe makes enough for three baths.

Essential Oil Bath Salt Blends

Cheer Up! Essential Oil Bath Salt Blend

7 drops Bergamot essential oil

7 drops Sweet Orange essential oil

1 drop Rose Geranium essential oil

Super Sedative Essential Oil Bath Salt Blend

8 drops Sandalwood essential oil

4 drops Lavender essential oil

3 drops Cedar essential oil

Pain Relief Essential Oil Bath Salt Blend

10 drops Lavender essential oil

3 drops Chamomile essential oil

2 drops Marjoram essential oil

Making your own aromatherapy bath salts is so easy and quick that almost anyone can do it. It’s a great activity to do with your children or grandchildren (just make sure an adult handles the essential oils.) Family time and play time all in one!

Plus, aromatherapy bath salts make great gifts – why not make up a big batch and share the love. We all have friends and relatives who could use a friendly jar of aromatherapy bath salts. Just remember to save some for yourself!

Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only. It is not intended to treat, prevent, diagnose, or cure any condition.

Kyley Zimmerman works from home and focuses on making her family life happy, healthy and eco-friendly.


She shares her love of making natural bath, body and home products at http://www.easy-aromatherapy-recipes.com/ Check it out!

Article from articlesbase.com

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