Product Focus: Packaging Components

Squeeze-and-Measure Cap
www.berlinpackaging.com
This patented Squeeze-and-Measure Dosing Closure delivers the correct dose of liquids with a squeeze, thanks to a three-part assembly including a dip tube, vacuum-sealed dosing chamber and flip-top cap. It can be sized to fit any squeezable stock bottle and standard neck finish with no custom preforms or fitments.

Opening Cap
www.tetrapak.com
Tetra Evero Aseptic’s (TEA) One Step Opening design provides the dual protection of a tamper evidence ring and a neck membrane on cap, while offering the convenience of one action opening, for ease-of-use. Devised for ambient white milk, the opening and the carton bottle intend to satisfy consumers’ quest for convenience in handling and pouring, while maintaining safety and environmental features.

Liquid Products Cap
www.weatherchem.com
Made of PP resin, the LiquiFlapper cap fits 33-400 mm and 38-400 mm bottles. The cap screws on and is available with either a ribbed or smooth skirt. Designed with a snap-tight leak resistant release, it provides portion-controlled, tear-drop flow for most household liquid products. LiquiFlapper is available in custom colors and embossing, it is also #5 recyclable.

Lid/Single-use Spoon
ecotensil.com
SpoonLidz by EcoTensil is an over-lid for single-serve cups, which converts to a sanitary and sturdy spoon in one easy fold. Convenient for on-the-go eating, the material-efficient SpoonLidz is made from silky-smooth, renewable paperboard. Customizable and brandable, SpoonLidz provides a sustainable value-add to yogurt, fruit and other to-go foods.

Wine Closure
www.nomacorc.com
Nomacorc, producer of alternative wine closures, has introduced a zero carbon footprint wine closure—Select Bio. The closure is made with plant-based polymers derived from sugar cane. Three distinct products, each with different oxygen ingress levels are available, with the same look and feel as the traditional Select Series. The Select Bio Series includes three distinct products, each with different oxygen ingress levels and have the same look and feel as the traditional Select Series.

Closure Solution
www.velcro.com
Velcro Brand Press-Lok closure, a product for the flexible packaging market, features a unique design that addresses any chance of package misalignment experienced by consumers.  A series of interlocking micro features connect at multiple levels, combined with tactile feel, make this new reclose fastener secure.

Lidding Foil
www.constantia-flexibles.com
Constantia Flexibles developed a paper-free, child-resistant blister lidding foil with upgraded peel/push functionalities. Offering a smooth, robust peel, Easy-Piesy, is an aluminum/PET/aluminum lamination that—due to its absence of paper—requires less heat during sealing compared with traditional paper-back foil structures. The paper-free design makes Easy-Piesy well-suited to cleanroom environments.

Flip-top Cap
www.stulltech.com
Easy-to-open, the Ultra Light Flip Top cap improves consumer convenience and brand loyalty with a modern opening mechanism and a cleaner, more sanitary orifice area. It’s specifically designed for products that require a squeezable motion and dispensing control. The liquid trap feature prevents separated liquid from dripping out, and the closure uses up to 20% less material than similar caps for greater sustainability.

Zipper for Carriers
www.hi-cone.com
Hi-Cone’s Zipper for multipack carriers is designed to provide value-added consumer convenience. The perforated tab is engineered to release the container with just one pull. The zipper makes it easy to remove one container at a time or all of the bottles.

Caps for Tubes
www.flex-products.com
The Flip Top Plug is a secure closure that features a quick flip of the finger to access the contents. Used on rectangular tubes, this package stores items safely and can be a package all its own. Diameter sizes begin at 0.43 x 1 in. and go up to 1 in. x 0.08-0.68. 

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Tetra Pak commits to renewable LDPE for cartons in Brazil






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/26/2013 2:50:21 PM





In a first for the carton packaging industry, Tetra Pak announced on June 26 that it plans to sign an agreement with Braskem, the largest thermoplastic resins producer in the Americas, for the supply of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) made from sugar cane to its packaging material factories in Brazil.

 

TetraPak LogoThis breakthrough initiative, which will be limited in scope to Brazil only for the duration of the trial, is scheduled to start during the first quarter of 2014. According to the plan, Tetra Pak will use bio-based LDPE as a component of its packages produced in Brazil. The planned move to bio-based LDPE means that 100 percent of Tetra Pak packages produced in Brazil, about 13 billion, will have up to 82 percent packaging material from renewable sources.

 

“The new agreement to be signed with Braskem demonstrates our commitment to bring environmental innovations to our customers and is a further step in our journey to develop fully renewable packages,” says Tetra Pak president and chief executive officer Dennis Jönsson.

 

Braskem will use ethanol derived from sugar cane to produce ethylene, which is then converted into LDPE. The LDPE made from renewable sugar cane has the same technical properties as LDPE made from fossil sources, and the environmental benefits of being from a renewable source. Braskem biopolymers are known under the trademark “I´m green”.

“The new bio-based I´m green LDPE is as inert, resistant and recyclable as the polyethylene made from fossil sources but, contributes to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during the sugar cane growth process,” says Braskem president Carlos Fadigas. “The expansion of the green products line reinforces our commitment to adding value through sustainable development for the value chain.”

 

Since 2008, the Brazilian paperboard chain of custody is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSCT), which means that all the paper used in the production of Tetra Pak packages comes from forests managed in accordance with responsible forestry management principles.

 

Tetra Pak was the first liquid food packaging supplier to use bio-based plastic in its packaging, launching Tetra Brik Aseptic packages with StreamCapT 1000 produced with bio-based high density polyethylene (HDPE) supplied by Braskem in 2011. Earlier this month the company announced global availability of a bio-based version of LightCapT 30, which uses HDPE made from sugar cane.

 

ABOUT BRASKEM
Braskem is the largest thermoplastic resins producer in the Americas. With 36 industrial plants spread in Brazil, the United States and Germany, the company produces over 16 million tons of thermoplastic resins and other petrochemical products annually. As the largest biopolymer producer in the world, Braskem has capacity to produce 200 thousand tons/year of polyethylene from sugar cane ethanol. Find more information at www.braskem.com.br

 

ABOUT THE FOREST STEWARDSHIP COUNCIL
The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is an independent, non-governmental, not for profit organization established to promote the responsible management of the world’s forests. FSC is a unique forum where stakeholders from around the world meet and, through strong multi-stakeholder processes, define essential social and environmental criteria for forest management. These fundamental principles are realized in forests worldwide through FSC certification. Find more information at www.fsc.org

Source: Tetra Pak

 

 

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Cap made from renewable material debuts on dairy’s aseptic cartons






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/4/2013 9:18:14 AM





Tine cartonTINE, a leading dairy producer, distributor and exporter based in Norway, is the first brand in Europe to use the bio-based LightCap 30 closure. Its Piano vanilla sauce, TINE iced coffee, iced tea and chocolate milk will be packaged in Tetra Brik Aseptic Edge cartons topped with the LightCap 30, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) cap made from sugar cane. Along with the cartons, the cap is also from Tetra Pak.

 

“As one of Norway’s largest users of packaging, it is important that we use our resources optimally and prioritize sustainability. This is a business imperative for us. Tetra Pak’s TBA Edge, which is made from about 75% renewable resources, now comes with bio-based cap, offering us the opportunity to further enhance the environmental profile of our products”, says Björn Malm, Sustainability Manager, at TINE.

 

The renewable polyethylene used in LightCap 30 starts out as sugar cane. The cane is crushed and the juice fermented and distilled to produce ethanol. Through a process of dehydration, ethanol is converted into ethylene, which is then polymerized to produce the polyethylene used to manufacture the cap.

 

“The development of the bio-based LightCap 30 is another important step towards our goal of producing a 100% renewable packaging solution. This launch demonstrates our continued commitment to environmental innovation and providing customers, retailers and consumers with the highest level of environmental performance for their packaging,” says Erik Steijger, Product Manager Environmental Innovation, Tetra Pak.

Read more about TINE, visit www.jarlsberg.com/about-tine

 

Source: Tetra Pak Inc.
847-955-600.

 

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Cap made from renewable material debuts on dairy’s aseptic cartons






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/4/2013 9:18:14 AM





Tine cartonTINE, a leading dairy producer, distributor and exporter based in Norway, is the first brand in Europe to use the bio-based LightCap 30 closure. Its Piano vanilla sauce, TINE iced coffee, iced tea and chocolate milk will be packaged in Tetra Brik Aseptic Edge cartons topped with the LightCap 30, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) cap made from sugar cane. Along with the cartons, the cap is also from Tetra Pak.

 

“As one of Norway’s largest users of packaging, it is important that we use our resources optimally and prioritize sustainability. This is a business imperative for us. Tetra Pak’s TBA Edge, which is made from about 75% renewable resources, now comes with bio-based cap, offering us the opportunity to further enhance the environmental profile of our products”, says Björn Malm, Sustainability Manager, at TINE.

 

The renewable polyethylene used in LightCap 30 starts out as sugar cane. The cane is crushed and the juice fermented and distilled to produce ethanol. Through a process of dehydration, ethanol is converted into ethylene, which is then polymerized to produce the polyethylene used to manufacture the cap.

 

“The development of the bio-based LightCap 30 is another important step towards our goal of producing a 100% renewable packaging solution. This launch demonstrates our continued commitment to environmental innovation and providing customers, retailers and consumers with the highest level of environmental performance for their packaging,” says Erik Steijger, Product Manager Environmental Innovation, Tetra Pak.

Read more about TINE, visit www.jarlsberg.com/about-tine

 

Source: Tetra Pak Inc.
847-955-600.

 

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Cap made from renewable material debuts on dairy’s aseptic cartons






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/4/2013 9:18:14 AM





Tine cartonTINE, a leading dairy producer, distributor and exporter based in Norway, is the first brand in Europe to use the bio-based LightCap 30 closure. Its Piano vanilla sauce, TINE iced coffee, iced tea and chocolate milk will be packaged in Tetra Brik Aseptic Edge cartons topped with the LightCap 30, a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) cap made from sugar cane. Along with the cartons, the cap is also from Tetra Pak.

 

“As one of Norway’s largest users of packaging, it is important that we use our resources optimally and prioritize sustainability. This is a business imperative for us. Tetra Pak’s TBA Edge, which is made from about 75% renewable resources, now comes with bio-based cap, offering us the opportunity to further enhance the environmental profile of our products”, says Björn Malm, Sustainability Manager, at TINE.

 

The renewable polyethylene used in LightCap 30 starts out as sugar cane. The cane is crushed and the juice fermented and distilled to produce ethanol. Through a process of dehydration, ethanol is converted into ethylene, which is then polymerized to produce the polyethylene used to manufacture the cap.

 

“The development of the bio-based LightCap 30 is another important step towards our goal of producing a 100% renewable packaging solution. This launch demonstrates our continued commitment to environmental innovation and providing customers, retailers and consumers with the highest level of environmental performance for their packaging,” says Erik Steijger, Product Manager Environmental Innovation, Tetra Pak.

Read more about TINE, visit www.jarlsberg.com/about-tine

 

Source: Tetra Pak Inc.
847-955-600.

 

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What’s Next for ‘The Next Generation of Plastic’?

What’s Next for ‘The Next Generation of Plastic’?

Plant-based packaging, designed to serve the same function as traditional plastics is being celebrated as a means of substituting petroleum as the central ingredient in creating plastic. Since their debut at the U.N. Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2009, an excess of 2.5 billion of these plant infused bottles have been and continue to be circulated world-wide. The Plant Bottle, a product of the Coca-Cola Co. is created by fermenting ethanol from Brazilian sugar-cane. This is the same method employed in creating the earlier plastics that posed less of a threat to the environment.

The most recent developments are as could be expected, more advanced in their design, specifically engineered to hold carbonation where earlier prototypes allowed it to escape through cell walls. Still, this is only the beginning for plant based plastics or biopolymers described as “the next generation of plastic” by Marc Verbruggen the president and CEO of Nature Works. Eventually, the goal is to create even more eco-friendly versions of the bottle derived from plant waste like the cellulose in the leaves and stems of sugarcane.

The necessity of maximizing production efficiency will continue to grow as plant-based plastics become standard. Currently, they inhabit roughly one percent of the total market and have saved an estimated 70,000 barrels of oil. This figure is impressive from a fossil fuel saving stand-point but the other side of production still needs improvement.
On a long enough timeline, the application of the sugar-cane to plastic production could have an effect on the food supply, but that moment is considerably down the road. Until then, alternatives are being explored. Frederic Scheer and his company Cereplast (CERP), for instance intends to introduce an algae-based bioplastic to the market by the close of this year, thereby distributing the environmental impact of current starch-based biopolymers. Cereplast already successfully markets a traditional bioplastic but recognizes the need for options that will help detract from the effect on food supply.

“You cannot have access to farmland without creating pressures on the food system,” he says. Still if companies engage in effective product research and explore a variety of alternative plastics it will still be less detrimental to the environment and present resources than traditional plastics. Scheer makes a point of noting that in addition to sugar and algae, residue from government-mandated production of corn-based ethanol can also be employed in plant-based plastic production.

With all the options, “it makes no sense,” he says of the current status quo. “It takes 77 million years to make fossil fuels and 45 minutes to use as a coffee cup.” 
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