New website launched for ‘EcoAware moms’






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Posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/22/2013 9:53:05 AM





 

EcoAware carton website

 

Today, more moms are taking steps toward a more eco-friendly lifestyle and are instilling those practices in their children. These “EcoAware Moms” strongly believe in leaving an eco-conscious legacy for their children to carry on.

According to EcoFocus Worldwide’s 2013 EcoFocus Trend Study, nearly three-fourths (73 percent) of women with kids are classified as EcoAware Moms. This group views sustainability from a hands-on point of view and believes there is a very close correlation between personal and environmental health.

In fact, many EcoAware Moms also consider the environmental impact of a product’s package as an important factor that influences their purchasing decision. Consider that: 

–Nearly three fourths (72 percent) believe that choosing products packaged responsibly is a very to extremely important action
–Some 83 percent try to buy products in packaging that is recyclable
–More than half (54 percent) usually or always think about the environmental impact of product packaging before purchasing 

“EcoAware Moms know their eco-friendly lifestyle choices are important in shaping their children’s attitudes as they grow into adulthood,” says Erin Reynolds, Evergreen Packaging’s marketing director. “With this in mind,families can choose product packaging made from renewable resources, such as cartons. Over 70 percent of a carton is made from paper, which comes from a renewable resource-trees.”

In an effort to provide families with information on packaging choices, Evergreen Packaging recently relaunched choosecartons.com, a community dedicated to educating consumers about the benefits and eco-friendly attributes of carton packaging. The website, which offers downloadable children’s activities, sharable tips and eco-facts, and regular Facebook promotions, is a simple, easy-to-access platform for those desiring to live an eco-friendlier lifestyle.

 

Source: Evergreen Packaging

 

 

 

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New website launched for ‘EcoAware moms’






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Posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/22/2013 9:53:05 AM





 

EcoAware carton website

 

Today, more moms are taking steps toward a more eco-friendly lifestyle and are instilling those practices in their children. These “EcoAware Moms” strongly believe in leaving an eco-conscious legacy for their children to carry on.

According to EcoFocus Worldwide’s 2013 EcoFocus Trend Study, nearly three-fourths (73 percent) of women with kids are classified as EcoAware Moms. This group views sustainability from a hands-on point of view and believes there is a very close correlation between personal and environmental health.

In fact, many EcoAware Moms also consider the environmental impact of a product’s package as an important factor that influences their purchasing decision. Consider that: 

–Nearly three fourths (72 percent) believe that choosing products packaged responsibly is a very to extremely important action
–Some 83 percent try to buy products in packaging that is recyclable
–More than half (54 percent) usually or always think about the environmental impact of product packaging before purchasing 

“EcoAware Moms know their eco-friendly lifestyle choices are important in shaping their children’s attitudes as they grow into adulthood,” says Erin Reynolds, Evergreen Packaging’s marketing director. “With this in mind,families can choose product packaging made from renewable resources, such as cartons. Over 70 percent of a carton is made from paper, which comes from a renewable resource-trees.”

In an effort to provide families with information on packaging choices, Evergreen Packaging recently relaunched choosecartons.com, a community dedicated to educating consumers about the benefits and eco-friendly attributes of carton packaging. The website, which offers downloadable children’s activities, sharable tips and eco-facts, and regular Facebook promotions, is a simple, easy-to-access platform for those desiring to live an eco-friendlier lifestyle.

 

Source: Evergreen Packaging

 

 

 

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New website launched for ‘EcoAware moms’






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Posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/22/2013 9:53:05 AM





 

EcoAware carton website

 

Today, more moms are taking steps toward a more eco-friendly lifestyle and are instilling those practices in their children. These “EcoAware Moms” strongly believe in leaving an eco-conscious legacy for their children to carry on.

According to EcoFocus Worldwide’s 2013 EcoFocus Trend Study, nearly three-fourths (73 percent) of women with kids are classified as EcoAware Moms. This group views sustainability from a hands-on point of view and believes there is a very close correlation between personal and environmental health.

In fact, many EcoAware Moms also consider the environmental impact of a product’s package as an important factor that influences their purchasing decision. Consider that: 

–Nearly three fourths (72 percent) believe that choosing products packaged responsibly is a very to extremely important action
–Some 83 percent try to buy products in packaging that is recyclable
–More than half (54 percent) usually or always think about the environmental impact of product packaging before purchasing 

“EcoAware Moms know their eco-friendly lifestyle choices are important in shaping their children’s attitudes as they grow into adulthood,” says Erin Reynolds, Evergreen Packaging’s marketing director. “With this in mind,families can choose product packaging made from renewable resources, such as cartons. Over 70 percent of a carton is made from paper, which comes from a renewable resource-trees.”

In an effort to provide families with information on packaging choices, Evergreen Packaging recently relaunched choosecartons.com, a community dedicated to educating consumers about the benefits and eco-friendly attributes of carton packaging. The website, which offers downloadable children’s activities, sharable tips and eco-facts, and regular Facebook promotions, is a simple, easy-to-access platform for those desiring to live an eco-friendlier lifestyle.

 

Source: Evergreen Packaging

 

 

 

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New website launched for ‘EcoAware moms’






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Posted by Kari Embree, Senior Digital Content Editor — Packaging Digest, 7/22/2013 9:53:05 AM





 

EcoAware carton website

 

Today, more moms are taking steps toward a more eco-friendly lifestyle and are instilling those practices in their children. These “EcoAware Moms” strongly believe in leaving an eco-conscious legacy for their children to carry on.

According to EcoFocus Worldwide’s 2013 EcoFocus Trend Study, nearly three-fourths (73 percent) of women with kids are classified as EcoAware Moms. This group views sustainability from a hands-on point of view and believes there is a very close correlation between personal and environmental health.

In fact, many EcoAware Moms also consider the environmental impact of a product’s package as an important factor that influences their purchasing decision. Consider that: 

–Nearly three fourths (72 percent) believe that choosing products packaged responsibly is a very to extremely important action
–Some 83 percent try to buy products in packaging that is recyclable
–More than half (54 percent) usually or always think about the environmental impact of product packaging before purchasing 

“EcoAware Moms know their eco-friendly lifestyle choices are important in shaping their children’s attitudes as they grow into adulthood,” says Erin Reynolds, Evergreen Packaging’s marketing director. “With this in mind,families can choose product packaging made from renewable resources, such as cartons. Over 70 percent of a carton is made from paper, which comes from a renewable resource-trees.”

In an effort to provide families with information on packaging choices, Evergreen Packaging recently relaunched choosecartons.com, a community dedicated to educating consumers about the benefits and eco-friendly attributes of carton packaging. The website, which offers downloadable children’s activities, sharable tips and eco-facts, and regular Facebook promotions, is a simple, easy-to-access platform for those desiring to live an eco-friendlier lifestyle.

 

Source: Evergreen Packaging

 

 

 

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Improve health and waste nothing: The Elemental Essentialz formula






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Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/14/2013 1:02:16 PM





 

Theresa HarrisTheresa HarrisTheresa Harris, founder/CEO of Elemental Essentialz, presents her unique sustainability-driven insights Tues., June 18, from 1:00 – 2:45 p.m. as part of the EastPack seminar series. For more information or to register for the conference or the show, visit www.eastpackshow.com.

 

As a chemistry teacher and former developmental specialist, Theresa saw firsthand the increase in developmental delays and disorders. Along with research linking chemicals found in our homes to an increase in various health issues, she felt an obligation to take what she knew and formulate cleaners that were both safe and effective.

 

Additional research led her to the realization that her customers were also concerned with consumption levels and waste production. The rebel in her itched to upset the status quo, and she decided to take on both issues, making it her mission to “Improve Health & Waste Nothing.”

 

Packaging Digest asked her to share insider information on her approach to business and packaging.

 

Q: What was your hobby and how was that propelled into a growing business?
A: Cake Pops (cake on a stick)! Unfortunately my teenage sons and I ate them faster than I could make them, and I realized I needed a hobby that nurtured my creativity, not my waistline. Around the same time I happened upon an article about the dangers of certain chemicals in cleaning products. I was shocked to learn the ingredients in household cleaners did not have to be listed in their entirety. I decided to make homemade cleaners that weren’t dangerous for my family. In doing so, I had three priorities, that they needed to be safe, smell nice and be pretty. 

I started with used wine bottles because they were beautiful and free! As an aside, it turned out that many high school teachers enjoy a glass of wine at the end of the day. I was proud of my little sets of cleaners and started sharing them with friends and family. The response was amazing…and here we are!

 

Q: What are the essentials of your “waste nothing” approach?
A:
Our approach is to bridge the gap between knowing what is right and being able to achieve it. Our customers want to consume and waste less. They do not want to negatively impact our planet. Current efforts to help make this happen, including improvements in packaging, are often “invisible” to consumers. That’s not to say those efforts aren’t admirable. The impact of these changes on our planet is positive and significant, but the customer doesn’t get to “feel” they are making their own contribution. By packaging in refillable and reusable glass bottles, we make it easy for our customers to feel good about joining the mission to “Reuse for Zero Waste.”

 

Q: Why has this resonated with retailers and consumers?
A:
Ultimately, we are making it easy for our customers to feel better about how they are treating our planet. Our products are safe, beautiful and, simply by purchasing their first bottles, consumers can “waste nothing.” The ambiguity over how, where or even if our bottles can be recycled is a non-issue and our customers never have to feel guilty about adding another empty household cleaner to our landfills or oceans. For retailers, I think they recognize the priority consumers are now placing on reducing waste. Providing a new and unique solution for their customers is an obvious win-win.

 

Q: What is one piece of advice you can share with consumer packaged goods companies?
A:
I feel funny offering advice to an industry to which I am still so very new, especially since I feel much of our success came about almost accidently. By hard work, yes. But a brilliant and calculated packaging plan, no. 

I’ll explain why I think that’s important. We chose wine bottles because they were pretty and, in the beginning, free. We started allowing our customers to refill them to save money—ours and theirs. Fast forward almost two years…our packaging approach is now considered by many to be sustainable and innovative. Thankfully, these are two good qualities to have these days. 

Looking back, I just wanted to make something that was safe and beautiful and the package was always part of the product. 

My advice would be, when considering a new package, treat it as part of the product, not separate from it, not something to be discarded. Ask yourself, is it safe? Is it beautiful? And will it always be? If the answer is no, I guess I would ask, what can be done to change that? 

 

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5 top global packaging trends






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The top five packaging trend opportunities for 2013.


Jim Lucas is evp, Global Insights & Strategy, at Schawk Inc. — Packaging Digest, 5/6/2013 2:28:30 PM





Are you maximizing your packaging to BE RELEVANT AND VALUABLE for today’s consumers?
Jim Lucas, Contributing Writer

With the first quarter of 2013 behind us, where lies the greatest potential for packaging? These top shopper/consumer trends are not predictions, but rather opportunities for packaging in the remainder of 2013 and beyond. Each of these opportunities is based on providing consumers with something that is useful or valuable. With that in mind, we look at five areas with positive potential.

1. Sustainability
Sustainability continues to be an important theme for consumers globally-but with some twists.

Increasingly, consumers are holding companies (manufacturers and retailers alike) to a higher standard than themselves. While consumers have come to expect green characteristics as an important element of products, they are less willing to pay a premium for these elements. While shoppers tend to purchase green products, enthusiasm has waned somewhat, according to Mintel’s Attitudes toward Corporate Social Responsibility-U.S., published in Sept. 2012. Whether ingredients, packaging or process, “green” is not the stand-out differentiator it once was. It is important, but not as top-of-mind. It is becoming a greens fee in the marketplace.

As transparency rises, the expectation is that companies will be green. Consumers have become more skeptical and need help determining whether a product delivers on its claims (that is: proof).

An example of this is Method’s Ocean Plastic packaging. Method’s Ocean Plastic has both a good back story (the plastic is harvested by Method employees from ocean beaches) and provides proof (post-consumer recycled plastic creates a uniquely gray resin color).

Sustainable packaging plays an important role in beauty and personal care (BPC) products, too. While not a primary element of BPC products, half (49 percent) feel it is important to have products made from recycled materials, and 43 percent think it is important to recycle BPC packaging. Fresh handmade natural personal care and cosmetics manufacturer Lush, for example, claims that 70 percent of its products don’t have packaging, according to Mintel’s Personal Care Consumer-U.S. report, published in Sept. 2012. Lush promotes on its website, “Where we can, we make products into solid form so we can ditch the packaging and preservatives.” What packaging Lush does use is made from 100 percent post-consumer recycled materials.

In sustainability’s new role, consumers look to companies to provide a platform that allows them to make a difference, to do something they might not be able to achieve on their own and feel good about their purchases.

2. Authentic, credible, traceable
Today’s value chain often obscures the connection between food products and their origins. Packaging is an opportunity to provide information about locale and traceability, and re-establish the connection between the consumer and food brand.

Reassurance of authenticity/credibility of products has become important in emerging markets. In China, products like infant formula and milk powder come with verification (such as seals or certification, holograms and QR codes).

Provenance can serve to communicate premium quality, authenticity and unique, distinctive taste. Companies like Japanese snack manufacturer Calbee, which is present in numerous markets, often incorporate local ingredients into many of its snack products in other markets. Heinz’s First Harvest Ketchup (sold in France) represents a unique combination of provenance and season.

3. Branding
In addition to standing out at the shelf, packaging continues to be an important part of branding. Packaging allows marketers and retailers to amplify a brand’s essence, connect with a brand’s heritage, pique interest in trial/purchase, demonstrate brand premium value and allow consumers to express themselves through choice.

Use of limited-edition and exclusive packs saw growth in 2012. Five markets (Japan, Germany, U.S., U.K. and France) account for 68 percent of exclusive/limited edition launches. Beauty and personal care, food and beverage account for 95 percent of launches. Exclusives and limited editions represent a huge opportunity for packaging to drive branding.

• Oreo’s 100th Anniversary packaging demonstrates that heritage, via longevity, does not have to be stuck in the past, but may be reimagined, updated.

• Retro packaging (used by many brands in 2012: Fanta, Ruffles, Doritos, Pepsi and Coke) helps amplify heritage via nostalgia. In addition to evoking fond memories, it can create appeal among younger users.

• 2012 saw the use of well-known designers to create limited-edition packaging with quality/luxury associations: Oria Kiely for Method, Emily Hogarth with Nivea and, of course, Andy Warhol’s iconic re-imagination of Campbell Soup cans.

• From predictability to possibility, new, limited-edition flavors help expand a brand’s equity, while tempting consumers to try/purchase. In essence, limited-time/exclusive flavors feed the consumers’ desire for the new or novel while maintaining the security of a known brand. Consumers are more likely to try new flavors from a brand they already know. Consumers welcome the novelty of limited-time flavors, but also find it intriguing to think differently about a brand.

• Seasonal/holiday and event-related packaging saw huge growth in 2012 (such as at the Olympics). The calendar is an opportunity for brands to create relevance with consumers. For example, snack maker Morinaga released a new package for Dars chocolate bar (intentionally printed backwards), as part of a clever Valentine’s Day promotional campaign. The custom for Valentine’s Day in Japan is for women to present small, inexpensive gifts of chocolate to male coworkers at the office (that is, “giri choco” obligatory chocolate).

 

4. Shoppers manage their budgets

Packaging has the potential to fit with new shopping behaviors. The shopping eco-system, comprised of both shoppers and shops, has witnessed some dramatic changes.

Research reported by SymphonyIRI’s Time and Trends suggests that shopping behavior has changed in response to the economic situation. There is more “just-in-time” purchasing (such as fill-in or top-off trips) taking place, and less pantry loading. Retail formats have come to reflect these changes, with different trip types tending to be associated with specific retail formats (such as Tesco Extra for big trips, Metro and Express for Top-off trips). Many retailers have also been experimenting with smaller formats (Tesco Metro and Express formats, Walmart Express and City Target).

Smaller, easier-to-carry packs with smaller price points hold potential not only in Europe and the U.S., but in traditional trade retailers in many emerging markets (such as kirana-India, changarro-Mexico and sari-sari-Philippines). As shoppers continue to cope with economic situations that stretch their budgets, they are trying to manage their basket. Flexible packaging is poised to play a huge role in Asia in the smaller/traditional retailers-for snacks, bakery items and more-to help shoppers maintain their budgets.

 

5. Wellness: What shoppers seek

Making it easier for shoppers to find what they are looking for in the health and wellness category is the Holy Grail. The kinds of mental shortcuts shoppers are using-the information or clues shoppers are looking for when facing the shelf-are critical for finding their way through the crowded, ever-changing shelves of health and wellness products. Key to success is focusing on the information that is most crucial in the minds of shoppers.

• Calling out key benefits or ingredients makes it easier for the shopper to find the right product for their needs. Mintel’s GNPD database indicates that claims such as “suitable for” (allergen-related claims) and “natural/organic/bio” confer currency on products. Each of these represents nearly 25 percent of the claims on new food/beverage product packaging introductions in 2012 from around the globe. Moreover, ingredients like Vitamins A, C, E and antioxidants hold positive associations for consumers/shoppers.

• Recent examples include GlaxoSmithKline’s Ribena Plus drink concentrate (U.K.), with real fruit juice, fortified with vitamins A, C and antioxidant vitamin E; Rewe Frei Von Backmischung für Schoko Muffins (Germany), a gluten-free cake mix for chocolate muffins with chocolate glaze; and Danone’s Activia Peach Nectar (Brazil), with fruit and prebiotic fibers. The goodness, simplicity and naturalness of ingredients are important.

• Beauty and personal care shoppers are more focused on benefits (such as beauty enhancing, brightening, reduced redness and toning). There are other “clues” packaging can provide that serve as reasons to believe, and make it easier to “choose at the shelf”-free from, natural/organic ingredients, vitamin/mineral fortified, dermatologically tested, clinically tested or hypoallergenic. Some recent examples include Tony Moly’s Clean Dew Broccoli Sprout Cleansing Cream (South Korea), made with blueberry, tomato and broccoli extracts, or Drogerie Markt’s Alverde Naturkosmetik Natural Light Make-Up (Germany), light formula with organic papaya and agave extracts for moisturizing. Complicated products require a simple story!

 

Create consumer relevance

In conclusion, the opportunities identified are based on shopper/consumer trends, and represent not so much predictions, as opportunities exhibited in the marketplace. While packaging has long been one of the most efficient marketing/media vehicles (10 to 25 percent of the cost advertising, promotion or display programs), technology, innovation, changing views and behaviors of consumers afford large potential for packaging.

With so many claims vying for attention at the shelf, providing simple, easy to understand benefits on the package is a great aid to shoppers. It communicates that the brand “gets them.”

Finally, more than any other time, packaging is poised to play a heroic role in the building of brand and business. As our review has shown, packaging can play a larger strategic role in helping brands create relevance for consumers.

 

Jim Lucas is evp, Global Insights & Strategy, at Schawk Inc. (www.schawk.com), a leading provider of brand development and deployment services. An avid student of shoppers and retailers, Lucas has been engaged in the development and practice of shopper marketing. Contact him at James.Lucas@schawk.com.
Mintel, 312-932-0400, www.mintel.com
SymphonyIRI, 312-726-1221, www.symphonyiri.com

 

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How2Recycle Label succeeds with companies and consumers






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Anne Bedarf, senior manager, GreenBlue Sustainable Packaging Coalition — Packaging Digest, 5/3/2013 5:53:23 PM





GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition (SPC) held its Spring Conference recently in San Francisco, bringing together professionals from companies, government agencies and other non-profits interested not only in packaging sustainability, but sustainability overall as it applies to products and systems.

During the meeting, the SPC released the Soft Launch Report for the How2Recycle Label, detailing the findings of the past year. In all, 12 companies have joined the program—Kellogg’s the most recent. The soft launch findings verify the How2Recycle Label is understood by consumers, leads consumers to action, elicits positive impressions of products and companies, and meets Federal Trade Commission requirements. 

The Label also proved to be a valuable tool for companies wishing to understand the specific recyclability of their packaging. In short, it is fulfilling the project goal of improving both the quality and quantity of package recycling. 

To help potential participants understand the business perspective of How2Recycle Label implementation, one of the SPC meeting breakout sessions featured the stories of three companies: Sealed Air, Kellogg Co. and Seventh Generation.

Laura Taney of Sealed Air kicked off the presentation focusing on the company’s experience implementing the “Store Drop-off” version of the label for polyethylene (PE) films on its Fill Air inflatable packaging. Taney recommended internal training and involvement happen early, particularly with marketing and legal departments. It considered participation in the H2R Label to be a great success, as it:

• Strengthened relationships with its customers;

• Contributed to sales growth;

• Enhanced the value of its products; and 

• Improved overall sustainability value propositions for Sealed Air and its customers.

Sealed Air will be placing the Label on additional PE film products in the near future.

Next, Melissa Craig of Kellogg Co. shared her perspective. The company’s goals in using the Label centered on informing its consumers on the recyclability of all package components and delivering a consistent message across all brands, in addition to being the first in the cereal category to use the Label.

Craig found that, because new products were involved, a non-disclosure agreement was essential. The How2Recycle License Agreement now includes an NDA section as an important learning from the soft launch. Finally, Craig found that a desire to move forward quickly must be balanced with an approach that takes into consideration varying packaging types, previously used recyclability language and company-wide communications. The Label was introduced on Special K cereal in April 2013, with other brands following soon after.

Peter Swaine of Seventh Generation was the final speaker. Seventh Generation’s focus on using post-consumer recycled content drove its support of the How2Recycle Label. As of April 2013, the company has used it on 71 stock-keeping units (SKUs).

Seventh Generation is incorporating the Label on all packaging as the label art is updated. A key internal tool was creating a “How2Recycle Library” that showed the appropriate label for each packaging type.

Swaine described the need to “run the gauntlet” of departments when doing internal consulting on the Label, including creative, operations, packaging, consumer science, claims, quality assurance, regulatory/legal, consumer relations and brand management. 

For the Label to have maximum effectiveness, additional participation is needed. See www.how2recycle.info/how2join for more information.

 

Author Anne Bedarf is a senior manager at GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition. For information about the Sustainable Packaging Coalition, visit www.sustainablepackaging.org

 

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Toasting ‘American-style’ EPR






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 5/3/2013 4:14:18 PM





Katie WallaceKatie Wallace, sustainability specialist, New Belgium BrewingEarlier this year, New Belgium Brewing pledged a one-time donation of $10,000 to support a cost-benefit analysis of extended producer responsibility (EPR). The research is being conducted by Recycling Reinvented (www.recycling-reinvented.org), a non-profit organization committed to increasing recycling rates of waste packaging and printed material in the U.S. through an EPR model. 

Katie Wallace, sustainability specialist and “Purveyor of the Good Life” at New Belgium Brewing, tells Packaging Digest why the Colorado-based brewer made the investment and why you should too.

 

Q: Why do you support the concept of business-driven extended producer responsibility (EPR)?
A:
In the United States, we generate more waste than almost any other country in the world, but we recycle far less than most developed countries. Many European countries enjoy a 70 percent recycling rate, while the U.S. musters up less than half of that at 33 percent. 

At New Belgium, we are a company of innovators, and we know we live in a country with some of the most inventive people and companies in all of history. With the expertise and genius we hold in this nation, we should be leading the world in recycling rates and intelligent use of valuable and finite natural resources, not falling at the end of the line. 

EPR captures the proven power of business and applies it to an ailing system which has the potential to improve our economy and our environment while preserving long-term viability of necessary resources for business.

Q: Why did you decide to work with Recycling Reinvented?
A:
The leadership at Recycling Reinvented has strong experience in private, public and non-profit sectors, and they are successfully working with an array of important stakeholders. We explored the multiple ways that a relatively small company like ours could have a meaningful impact and make efficient use of our donation, and Recycling Reinvented presented the best-fit option.

Q: How will the program increase recycling of your used packaging materials?
A:
Bottle bills, which exist in a handful of states, can be effective at increasing recycling. On average a non-bottle bill state will recycle 10 to 15 percent of their glass bottles, while effective bottle bills will bring a state to a 70 percent recycling rate. The limitation here is that we are only addressing bottles. 

This is a missed opportunity for other materials, such as paper and paperboard, for example. EPR broadens the scope to affect more materials. EPR allows brands, our suppliers and recyclers to collaborate on the quality of recycled materials and the needs of the marketplace. When all brands (not just beverage companies) chip in to fund recycling according to the value and recyclability of their packaging and paper, it creates a broader base of financial support. This allows for increased supply of recycled materials and promotes more recyclable and recycled-content packaging and paper.

Q: What are the benefits of EPR for New Belgium Brewing? For other product marketers?
A:
Any system that improves the environment at large, our habitat and source of life and livelihood, will help New Belgium Brewing. We, as all companies, depend upon the health of our natural resources. We’ve always been a values-driven business. Environmental stewardship is cemented in our Core Values & Beliefs. The ability of future generations to not only provide for themselves but to thrive and flourish is a concept we believe in whole-heartedly. The intelligent collection and reuse of our natural resources will result in a stronger economy, more jobs, as well as reduced need for mining and greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction. Our brewery will benefit from this, as will others who depend on long-term resource vitality and a strong economy.

Q: In public materials, you’ve made reference to an “American style” of EPR. What do you mean by that?
A:
Europe and Canada introduced EPR as primarily a top-down environmental strategy. In the U.S., we are interested in this for environmental reasons, but also for economic ones. The supply of recycled materials is not currently meeting domestic and global demand. Increased recycling helps to lower commodity costs. Using EPR—as opposed to recycling funded by local governments (which comes from ratepayers and taxpayers)—makes recycling more responsive to the market. Consumers will then pay for recycling in the cost of products according to what they consume rather than according to their property.

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Sealed Air and Ecovative Expand Relationship to Produce, Sell and Distribute Mushroom Packaging in Europe

Sealed Air Corporation (NYSE: SEE) and Ecovative Design LLC completed an agreement to expand their existing relationship in order to continue to accelerate the production, sales and distribution of Ecovative’s Mushroom Packaging in Europe.  Sealed Air plans to begin offering the products in Europe immediately.

Last year the two companies announced Sealed Air as the exclusive licensee for protective packaging in North America for Mushroom Packaging, a new technology for rapidly renewable and environmentally responsible packaging materials made from agricultural byproducts and mycelium, or mushroom roots.   In October 2012, Sealed Air launched Restore Mushroom Packaging, its first commercialized product using Ecovative’s biomaterial technology.

“The agreement builds upon our successful, ground breaking relationship with Sealed Air and continues the overall momentum for providing an innovative and effective alternative to petrochemical based packaging on a much larger scale,” said Eben Bayer, CEO of Ecovative. “We are confident that we can extend this momentum into the European marketplace.”

“Ecovative has had a great deal of success using the unique properties of mycelium for protective packaging. We are looking forward to meeting the performance needs of potential European customers through a variety of packaging applications using this technology,” said Ryan Flanagan, president of Sealed Air’s Protective Packaging business.  “Through our SmartLife commitment, we are reducing waste throughout the supply chain and helping our customers achieve their sustainability objectives by choosing the right solutions for the right needs, without sacrificing performance or cost competitiveness.”

Details of the transaction were not disclosed.  Sealed Air does not expect the transaction to be material to its consolidated financial position or results of operations.

About Sealed Air
Sealed Air is a global leader in food safety and security, facility hygiene and product protection. With widely recognized and inventive brands such as Bubble Wrap brand cushioning, Cryovac brand food packaging solutions and Diversey brand cleaning and hygiene solutions, Sealed Air offers efficient and sustainable solutions that create business value for customers, enhance the quality of life for consumers and provide a cleaner and healthier environment for future generations. Sealed Air generated revenue of approximately $7.6 billion in 2012, and has approximately 25,000 employees who serve customers in 175 countries.

About Ecovative
Founded in 2007, Ecovative is a materials science company developing a new class of home-compostable bioplastics based on mycelium, an organism akin to a living polymer. Ecovative’s high-performance products serve as environmentally responsible alternatives to traditional foam packaging, insulation, and other plastic-based materials. Ecovative was incubated at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Rensselaer, together with 3M Company and the DOEN Foundation, are significant investors in Ecovative. Ecovative has been recognized with numerous international awards for sustainability and “green” technologies, and was named a Tech Pioneer at the 2011 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Ecovative’s growth has been fueled by grants, prizes, and support from key partners including the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance.

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Who is willing to fork out more for fresh and sustainable packaging?






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Posted by Lisa McTigue Pierce, Executive Editor — Packaging Digest, 4/8/2013 10:57:55 AM





 

Fresh foods (Microsoft)When it comes to food and beverage packaging, consumers are most likely to pay more for value-added features that relate to freshness and sustainability. This is the latest finding from a global study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

Consumers from around the world were given a list of potential packaging features and asked which ones they would be willing to pay more for. On a global basis, consumers were most likely to say they would pay more for “Packaging that keeps food fresh longer” (55 percent) and “Packaging that is environmentally-friendly” (55 percent).

 

Following freshness and environmental benefits, consumers said they were likely to pay more for packaging that is re-usable (42 percent) and easier to use (39 percent). Interestingly, more sophisticated packaging features were less likely to motivate consumers to spend more: packaging that prevents mess or spills, keeps food and beverages at the right temperature, and makes it easier to eat and drink on-the-go ranked lowest (34 percent, 33 percent and 31 percent, respectively).

 

“Packaging plays a key role in consumer packaged goods innovation, whether marketers are introducing new products or trying to invigorate existing brands” ,” says Lauren Demar, global CEO, Ipsos InnoQuest. “As a key driver in the consumer’s decision to buy, packaging features can often be leveraged to charge a premium. Our latest findings indicate that consumers place the most value on packaging that preserves freshness and offers environmental benefits. For marketers, there may be an opportunity to win over consumers and increase revenues through innovative package designs that deliver sustainability of freshness as well as sustainability of the planet.”

 

The survey also revealed that certain countries were more likely to say they would pay more for fresh and sustainable packaging:

 

South Africa, Malaysia and India were most likely to say they would pay more for packaging that keeps food fresh longer.

Mexico, South Africa and Indonesia were most likely to say they would pay more for environmentally-friendly packing.

 

Complimentary access to the data in this report for each of the 26 countries is available upon request from Ipsos InnoQuest.

 

These are the findings from a study conducted by Ipsos InnoQuest via Ipsos Global @dvisor, an online survey of citizens around the world. A total of 19,883 adults from 26 countries were polled between Aug. 7 and 21, 2012. The countries included Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.

 

Source: Ipsos InnoQuest

 

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