MEGA AIRLESS AND GREEN PACKAGING SOLUTIONS: DISPENSING THAT HELPS CUSTOMERS, CONSUMERS AND THE PLANET

 Mega Airless’ German-engineered, airless, neutral and fully recyclable packaging solutions are being selected by both the growing ranks of multinationals and entrepreneurial, regional brand owners that adhere to strict corporate sustainability goals – and offer advanced formulations that require the highest levels of protection.

Companies such as The Body Shop, MediPharma, Alverde, Carroten, Wellments and Le Petit Olivier have recently launched Mega Airless-powered products with new generation ingredients added to the bulk.  Such innovative firms simultaneously seek to reinforce their eco-friendly positioning, an attribute that appeals to a growing consumer segment.

Mega Airless, the world’s largest all-airless package solutions provider, offers the neutral, all-plastic dispensing solutions that can protect and preserve such new-breed formulations and meet the requirements of the world’s most stringent certification bodies.  In fact, the company has achieved an Ecocert conformity attestation for all its dispenser models: Micros, Mezzos, Minis, Midis, Macro Slims, Macro Compacts and Macro Ovals.  Ecocert is an inspection and certification body for sustainable development.  

In addition to being Ecocert conformity-attested dispensers, as well as meeting the requirements of NaTru, Oeko-Test and other certification bodies, the Mega Airless dispenser range earned a recycling certificate from COTREP, a leading governing body that recognizes and identifies the finest in innovative, sustainable packaging.

According to Mega Airless’ Eric Desmaris, Business Development Director, “This is important news for those firms that base their core brand premise on a foundation of sustainability.  Our approach to sustainability is simply this: green packaging should not be special or optional packaging. 

“Rather, we company believes that green packaging should be the norm, rather than the exception,” Desmaris said.  “Our credo is to ‘bake sustainability into the cake’ from product development and design, through the manufacturing process, and via enhanced supply chain efficiencies.”

In terms of product design, Mega Airless strives to use the least possible resources, especially raw materials.  Material mix is avoided and the polyolefin family is preferred.  Optimal fill volume is delivered to the consumer.  Components are developed in a way that optimizes the ease of manufacture.  Further, Mega Airless reduces the number of component parts, for performance and precision.  Very viscous creams and gels are dispensed with up to 98 percent complete evacuation, for no waste of the bulk. 

All-plastic materials are used, FDA/EP approved, for complete and easy recycling.  Post-consumer, recycled resins are used.  And Mega Airless dispensers are designed without elastomers or silicon-based materials.  Of course, the company’s manufacturing tradition is to utilize only lean and environmentally friendly production. 

Every Mega Airless dispenser is vacuum-tested inline – no transportation waste — and delivers precision dosing, quick-priming, superior evacuation and 360-degree operation – with no drips, clogs, drying or product contamination.  In addition, Mega Airless’ mix-and-match product family reduces the size of the parts catalogue. 

Mega Airless has 25 years of airless experience and 30 patents, for unsurpassed value and performance.

ABOUT MEGA AIRLESS DISPENSING SOLUTIONS

The company’s neutral, all-plastic airless dispensers are designed to protect today’s advanced formulations and natural products for facial and skin care and are engineered for full recyclability in conformation with EcoCert, NaTru, Oko-Test and other international labels – increasingly important in countries throughout the world.

All Mega Airless dispensers are equipped with the company’s exclusive airless pump that offers unsurpassed neutrality, precise and consistent dosage, optimal product recovery and convenient 360-degree operation.  They are designed to handle a wide range of viscosities, including the most demanding new formulations used in today’s creams, gels, lotions and pastes.

The 100 percent plastic airless dispensers are made in one location (mould manufacturing, injection moulding, assembly, decoration), which eliminates complex supply chains and reduces the CO2 impact. In addition, continuous Mega Airless investment in state-of-the-art equipment delivers economic and environmental efficiencies.

 

 

Editor’s Note: This post was shared by a member of the Package Design community. Do you have news to share with our readers or a package design project that you are especially proud of? Click here to learn how you can become a contributing member of the Package Design online community.

 

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PureCircle announces ambitious 2020 sustainability goals






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Posted by Jack Mans, Plant Operations Editor — Packaging Digest, 6/12/2013 9:23:32 AM





PureCircle, a leading producer and marketer of high puC - daily - PureCircle_logo.jpegrity stevia products, announced today that it has expanded its Sustainability program and set an ambitious 2020 goal to reduce carbon, water, waste and energy use across its supply chain from farm to sweetener.

These goals mark a significant commitment to making a positive impact on the food and beverage industry’s environmental footprint and helping to tackle the global obesity challenge. PureCircle’s efforts will enable a cumulative reduction of the food & beverage industries’:

       • Carbon emissions by one million metric tons by 2020
       • Water consumption by two trillion liters by 2020
       • Calories in global diets by 13 trillion by 2020

 

When setting these ambitious commitments, PureCircle drew from the industry leading work it has undertaken to measure its carbon and water footprint. PureCircle was the first in the stevia industry to measure and publish results of the carbon and water footprint from farm to sweetener.

 

In Fiscal 2012, it completed its second carbon footprint, which together with the 2011 study formed the basis for the 2020 goals. These goals show that PureCircle stevia has a significantly lower environmental footprint than other natural mainstream sweeteners (high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), beet and cane sugar) based on publically available benchmarks.

 

Building on the progress the company has already made to reduce its carbon emissions and water use, the 2020 goals layout PureCircle’s commitments to have zero untreated waste to landfill and support 100,000 farmers by 2020. PureCircle‘s own vertically integrated supply chain, allows for innovation and traceability from farm to final stevia ingredient.

 

Ajay Chandran, Global Marketing and Sustainability Director said: “It is PureCircle’s vision to lead the global expansion of stevia as the next mass volume natural sweetener that is grown, processed and delivered in a way that respects people and the planet. Our 2020 goals, published today, demonstrate this vision in action. Our customers and consumers can be assured of our long-term commitment to further embedding sustainability principles and practices across our integrated supply chain, which will result in improved products with a reduced impact.

 

“As the world’s largest stevia producer and supplier, we recognize the unique role we can play in helping the food and beverage industry to reduce its impact on the environment and tackle the global obesity challenge, with our goals articulating the significant role we can play in this respect.”

The 2020 goals serve as an important next step in PureCircle’s sustainability journey, following the company’s publication of its Sustainability Commitment in 2011 and first Carbon and Water Footprint in 2012.

 

To learn more about PureCircle’s 2020 Sustainability Goals, visit: http://purecircle.com/company/corporate-social-responsibility/our-2020-sustainability-goals







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BioPlastek

Session 1: IS THE SUCCESS OF BIOPLASTICS DEPENDENT ON CONSUMER BUY-IN?
Is it really important to engage the customer or will renewable materials just become part of the supply chain? If the consumer is to be engaged, how will it be explained? It’s way more complicated than recycling!!… This session features new consumer research and major brand owners who will talk about consumer engagement in bioplastics. Additionally there will be a panel discussion in which we will ask attendees for their opinions on consumer engagement.

Session 2: VISIONARIES: EARLY ADOPTERS FOR SUSTAINABILITY
Plastics manufactured from plant-based raw materials are becoming a reality. However, they come at a cost premium. This session will discuss why brand owners choose renewable materials for their products in spite of added cost. Speakers will also discuss how renewable materials have to coexist with recycling (raw materials as well as the product itself) — are these competitive or reinforcing in reaching sustainability goals? In addition, challenges related to biomaterial supply chains will also be covered.

Session 3: IS COST-PARITY OF BIOPLASTICS WITH FOSSIL-BASED PLASTICS ACHIEVABLE?
The successful commercialization and market penetration of biobased chemical and plastics depends most critically on being cost competitive with incumbent, fossil-based technologies and products. This session and the succeeding two will pinpoint the reasons why bioplastics are currently more expensive to produce than their fossil-based counterparts. It will identify what new technology initiatives are evolving to bridge the cost gap. The session will also explore if cheap ethylene from shale gas will dampen development of bioplastics.

Session 4: NEXT-GENERATION BIOMASS FEEDSTOCKS: KEY TO COST-COMPETITIVE BIOPLASTICS?
In this session, the pros and cons of alternative next generation biomass feedstocks, storage issues are assessed. The impact of densification of biomass for more cost-effective handling and transport are considered. Strategies for streamlining the biomass harvesting/biorefinery operations infrastructure will be described.

Session 5: PROMISING ROUTES TO COST-EFFECTIVE BIOPLASTICS
This session will focus on key process technologies such as cellulose hydrolysis, biomass gasification, genetically engineered fermentations, and various thermochemical and catalytic technologies. It will demonstrate that the above process technologies, plus scale-ups, utilization of existing supply chains, and alternative chemistries all contribute to provide economically viable bioplastic production.

Session 6: OPPORTUNITIES FOR BIOPLASTICS IN NONWOVEN/FIBER USES
The commercial adoption of a new material in any particular application depends on the right combination of need, performance, economics, customer receptivity, the competition, and a host of other case specifics. This session sheds light on the actual decision drivers that will determine the future potential for bioplastics in the nonwovens/fibers industries, with perspectives from a number of vantage points along the value chain.

Session 7: OPPORTUNITIES FOR BIOPLASTICS IN PACKAGING APPLICATIONS
Packaging is currently the largest application for bioplastics, largely due to the Coca-Cola’s PlantBottle. Despite this progress, the higher cost of “drop-in” bioplastics versus fossil-based incumbent resins has limited market penetration. In flexible packaging, performance as well as cost have limited acceptance of bioplastics. Speakers from packaged goods companies, packaging converters and bioplastics resin suppliers will talk about how these challenges might be successfully overcome.

Session 8: THE ROLE OF BIOPLASTICS IN CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES
How do brand owners evaluate sustainability of packaging? Do LCAs, carbon footprints and other techniques correctly measure the sustainability? Are bioplastics really better for the planet than petroleum-based plastics? Recyclable, compostable, bio-based: Which is environmentally better? How are bioplastics being included in corporate sustainability initiatives?

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Embracing the ugly stepchildren of sustainability






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Adam Gendell, Project Manager, Sustainable Packaging Coalition — Packaging Digest, 4/1/2013 6:00:00 PM





 

You have probably never heard of a package that is advertised for its superior low acidification potential. It’s similarly doubtful that many corporate sustainability goals include a reduction of eutrophication. And it’s all but certain that a packaging decision has never been made based on an estimate of ionizing radiation. These kinds of indicators are what I like to call the “ugly stepchildren” of sustainability—we know that maybe they ought to receive our attention, but they end up not getting much of it. 

The reality is that experts can continue to identify a plethora of important sustainability indicators, but they can’t make companies use them. The choice to use certain indicators lies with the packaging decision makers, who have varying goals and may or may not be the sustainability experts. 

One challenge lies in the large and growing number of environmental indicators, and the fact that environmental considerations are only one of several considerations used in decision-making alongside things like cost, availability and marketability. Weighing the merits of several considerations creates the desire for simplified information. Cost is often boiled down to one number. Availability can be as simple as a yes or no. 

Marketability, however, is a bit more of an interesting consideration, and perhaps it could serve as a model for determining environmental preferability. To determine marketability, complex information from consumer testing, focus groups, insights and educated guesses may be all distilled into one feeling of whether or not a package will do well in the marketplace. Environmental preferability should follow a similar route—a complex set of indicators used to inform one judgment: whether or not the package will be sufficiently benign to the environment over its life cycle.

The trend in determining environmental preferability, though, is to use a sparse set of indicators rather than a complex one. Recyclability seems to be a commonly used indicator (though the idea of recyclability in itself can be rather complex). It’s not uncommon for a single metric to be the only contributor used in determining environmental preferability.

As for the ugly stepchildren, they remain on the outside looking in. If a package does happen to be preferable in, say, SOx and NOx emissions, then that information might make its way into marketing materials and be used as justification for the superiority of the package. But we’re a long way from realizing a supply chain where a unified set of numerous indicators are always used in every decision.

At the root of the issue lie the perceptions of consumers on sustainability considerations. The trickle-up effect from consumers is often indirect and convoluted, but any profit-seeking enterprise has a prime directive to provide a product that is desired by consumers. Unfortunately for our ugly stepchildren, consumers haven’t heard about the importance of ionizing radiation and eutrophication potential either, and it’s unlikely that they can all become the next incarnation of concern over global warming. 

If consumers concern themselves with the environmental attributes of packaging, it’s likely that they too will simplify the situation. More often than not, that simplification results in a perception of waste generation. To a consumer, less packaging is good, recyclable packaging is better—and that’s often the extent of the consideration.

Consumers cannot be expected to understand every aspect of sustainability as it applies to packaging. The torch must be passed to industry if a holistic set of environmental indicators is ever to be used in supply chain decision-making. If this is to happen, the embracers of the ugly stepchildren must light the way. 

Author Adam Gendell is a project manager at GreenBlue’s Sustainable Packaging Coalition. For additional information about the Sustainable Packaging Coalition, visit www.sustainablepackaging.org.

 

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Unilever reduces waste by one million household bins






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Posted by Rick Lingle, Technical Editor — Packaging Digest, 2/13/2013 3:47:52 PM





 

Unilever Knorr 322Unilever reported that more than 50 percent of all its factories have achieved the goal of sending no waste to landfill in 2012.

 

This goal was achieved while the company reported annual sales of €51 billion – up from €40 billion when Unilever set out its new vision of doubling the size of its business while reducing its environmental impact and increasing its positive social impact. Unilever has already reached the milestone of 100% of sites sending zero waste to landfill in 18 countries. This achievement is equivalent to removing more than one million household bins of waste every year.

 

Over 130 Unilever factories across the world, from Costa Rica to Japan, send no non-hazardous waste to landfill, up from 74 at start of the year. Key driver for this achievement is the elimination of waste in the factories. Additionally, waste is reduced, reused, recycled and recovered. Under its Sustainable Living Plan, Unilever announced that by 2020, total waste sent for disposal will be at or below 2008 levels – despite producing significantly higher volumes. Today, Unilever is stretching the original target even further by bringing the 2020 commitment 5 years forward. A total of 252 factories across the world will not send any non-hazardous waste to landfill by end of 2015.

 

“This is a significant achievement for Unilever as we make progress towards reaching our ambitious sustainability goals,” says Tony Dunnage, Unilever eco-efficiency manager. “It’s a great example of how we are putting our sustainability strategy into action – by decoupling the growth of our business from its environmental impact. Today’s landmark demonstrates how our factories are more environmentally responsible, which is helping us to save money to invest in our business. Having over 130 sites not sending waste to landfill equates to a cost saving of almost €70 million, all achieved without the need for capital expenditure.”

 

Unilever is implementing best practices from all over the world, actively using the global supply chain network, to create more environmentally responsible factories. By using the “design once and deploy everywhere” philosophy, the company is driving a sustainable model that is good for the environment and saves costs. Every new factory will produce 50% less waste than 5 years ago and will not send any non-hazardous waste to landfill by design.

 

Where reduction of waste is not sufficient it will reuse, recover or recycle waste to reach zero-waste to landfill. For example, in Russia Unilever collects a few tons of perforated outer-tea bags annually and this is sold in pet shops as animal bedding, used for wallpaper, etc. In Hefei (China) Unilever reduced plastics to wrap boxes on pallets by replacing it with reusable elastic fabrics.

 

Source: Unilever

 

 

 







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